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Election Night in AL

It is 8pm and the polls have closed in Alabama….

Posted by Dave at 8:00 pm
Filed under: General | Comments (1,371)

1,371 Responses to “Election Night in AL”

  1. Diamond Jim says:

    I

  2. jason says:

    MG is proud of a scumbag who doesn’t believe in the rule of law or the Constitution being elected Senator.

    I am embarrassed.

  3. mnw says:

    I just want to hold that fun seat, even if I have to hold my nose too.

  4. mnw says:

    sb “fn”

  5. MichiganGuy says:

    Jason, that should say “MG is proud of a man of God who believes in defending God’s Law even if, it cost him his job.

  6. mnw says:

    75/27

    Reports that media are disproportionately present at Moore hq.

  7. Tgca says:

    Cinco Bebe! Cinco!

  8. MichiganGuy says:

    CNN are saying if exit polls are correct Moore is going to win.

  9. Tgca says:

    Ok. Ocho. I’ll taje ocho.

  10. mnw says:

    MG

    I read that too.

  11. mnw says:

    Let’s get it called for Moore so that I can watch the Bluz.

  12. DW says:

    1st votes in

    Moore up 77% to 22%

  13. JC says:

    Moore will outperform his exit polling. He has been stigmatized, so his voters won’t want to admit voting for him, especially with the ‘pedo’ tag being passed around.

  14. Tgca says:

    According to NYT results, Jones I s slaughtering Moore. With 427 votes in, Jones has 321 votes or 75%. This race is over folks.

  15. Cash Cow TM says:

    fn site not worky…

    Sorry.

  16. BayernFan says:

    lol Drudge has it backwards

  17. Redmen4ever says:

    Looks like the Fox News Poll molested Alabama.

  18. Waingro says:

    56-44 Jones with about 900 votes in.

  19. Redmen4ever says:

    NBC Exit Poll:

    65% white / 30% black / 5% other
    44% Republican / 36% Democrat / 20% other

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/2017-election/AL

  20. Todd McCain says:

    71% white voters for Moore.

    Jones needs a much higher share to have a chance.

  21. Waingro says:

    Birmingham starting to pour in so Jones now up big.

  22. BayernFan says:

    24…so you’re saying there’s a chance?

  23. Waingro says:

    58.9 to 40.7 Jones. Still less than 1 percent in.

  24. mnw says:

    BF

    reference to that line in the movie? Was it Porky’s III?

  25. BayernFan says:

    who do the Russians want to be “elected”?

  26. BayernFan says:

    I think dumb and dumber?

  27. Mr.Vito says:

    exit poll looks like a razor thin margin to me…

  28. Phil says:

    Uh, Moore badly underperforming in even rural counties.

  29. DW says:

    31 – that’s what I was about to say. Not looking good for Moore.

  30. MichiganGuy says:

    Calm down only 1% in. lol

  31. Todd McCain says:

    Right, less than 1% in; we know nothing.

  32. DW says:

    well, one rural county off kilter doesn’t mean much…but Moore is trailing in several counties where, even at 1% reported, he should be leading.

  33. Mr.Vito says:

    I don’t care if Moore wins or loses. The exit poll right now is a razor thin margin… just facts.

  34. Phil says:

    At least I’ll never ever have to hear the name Roy Moore ever again.

    Fine with me.

  35. MichiganGuy says:

    lol

  36. MichiganGuy says:

    Phil already calling the race. lol

  37. DW says:

    Moore getting killed 3-1 in Montgomery and 7-3 in Mobile. Nothing yet out of Birmingham.

  38. Todd McCain says:

    Ask President Kerry about exit polls.

  39. DW says:

    Moore catching up a little…now 59 to 40.5

  40. Paul says:

    Talladego county is interesting. Going for Jones. I don’t think that was on anyone’s radar to be a Jones county.

  41. Cash Cow TM says:

    Well, well, well…

  42. DW says:

    now 58-42

  43. BayernFan says:

    what county is Birmingham?

  44. lisab says:

    Phil says:
    December 12, 2017 at 8:32 pm
    At least I’ll never ever have to hear the name Roy Moore ever again.

    Fine with me.
    ———————–

    robbie will remind you daily

  45. Paul says:

    Is Limestone County where Huntsville is?

  46. BayernFan says:

    d’uh Jefferson

  47. Paul says:

    Jefferson is Birmingham. That will be a Jones blowout.

  48. DW says:

    First Birmingham votes…Moore getting slaughtered there almost 9-1

  49. dblaikie says:

    Talladego county has less than 500 votes reporting.

  50. DW says:

    back to a 60/40 lead.

  51. Paul says:

    I see about 3,000 votes counted for Talladego with 65/34 for Jones.

  52. Tina says:

    Barris does not appear optimistic now.

  53. Cash Cow TM says:

    If Jones wins, the left nationwide will be emboldened and insufferable.

    And so will the left wing trolls at HHR.

  54. Paul says:

    Madison County is Huntsville… by the way. I looked it up.

  55. Phil says:

    Yep. This baby is over. Moore running 25 points behind Trump in the reddest rural counties. Done.

    Night all.

  56. DW says:

    I closed the page…anyone still have up the betting market at this moment?

  57. Paul says:

    Betting markets are going wild.

  58. Todd McCain says:

    Early results look good for Jones, but they are as they are, early results.

    You cant base anything off 1% and its extremely silly.

  59. Paul says:

    57 / 42 on the elecitonbetting.com

  60. MichiganGuy says:

    lol@Phil what a jackass

  61. Redmen4ever says:

    Exit poll: Moore +1

    NY Times projection based on first 1 percent of the vote: Jones +0.3

    Democrats, Liberals: 0 percent other, Blacks: 1 percent other

  62. BayernFan says:

    53-46 now

  63. JC says:

    Rural is starting to roll in.

  64. Paul says:

    There are several counties up by Birmingham that are blue. These aren’t the “black belt” counties down by Montgomery. Most of the “black belt” hasn’t come in yet. I think Moore might very well lose. Very surprising.

  65. Todd McCain says:

    Paul,

    I thought you were leaving.

  66. Waingro says:

    “Very early, positive news for Jones: he received 31% of the vote in one Cullman County precinct. This is important because Hillary Clinton failed to break 15% of the vote in *any* Cullman precinct in 2016, save for one black majority precinct that’s deep blue.”

    https://twitter.com/redistrict/status/940758152869490690

  67. Paul says:

    Jones is about to be ahead in the betting odds.

  68. Paul says:

    Jones has pulled ahead at electionbettingodds.com

  69. lisab says:

    53/45 nyt

  70. BayernFan says:

    52-47

  71. Waingro says:

    Jones lead now down to 6.

  72. Waingro says:

    Boom lead down to 1.2%

  73. BayernFan says:

    50-49

  74. lisab says:

    52/46 nyt

  75. Marv says:

    Jones by 1.2 pts. NYT

  76. Cash Cow TM says:

    May I be the first to congratulate Senator Jones.

    Trump takes it on the chin tonight (or maybe a knee to the groin).

    Wonder what his twitter fingers will tweet?

  77. MichiganGuy says:

    Jones 50

    Moore 48.8%

    4%

  78. BayernFan says:

    Moore leads

  79. Marv says:

    Roy Moore by 2 pts

  80. BayernFan says:

    Moore ahead 50-48

  81. lisab says:

    50/49 drudge

  82. JC says:

    Roy has now taken the lead.

    What a roller coaster.

  83. lisab says:

    51/47 MOORE nyt

  84. BayernFan says:

    Moore up 4%

  85. Waingro says:

    Moore winning.

  86. BayernFan says:

    53-46 Moore

  87. lisab says:

    53/46 moore nyt

  88. MichiganGuy says:

    Moore up by 7%

  89. BayernFan says:

    nyt estimates a very narrow Moore win

  90. lisab says:

    nyt now predicts tie

  91. Waingro says:

    Moore crushing now.

  92. BayernFan says:

    idiot write-in voters. Wasted votes. So dumb.

  93. lisab says:

    nyt moore slight edge

  94. BayernFan says:

    54-45 Moore

  95. Paul says:

    There’s nine counties that Clinton won that haven’t any results in yet. These are the “black belt” counties.

  96. Todd McCain says:

    Moore now up 8.

  97. BayernFan says:

    NYT sys Moore 52% chance of winning

  98. Todd McCain says:

    Dave Wasserman??Verified account? @Redistrict · 1m1 minute ago

    ? More

    Jones losing Houston Co. by 28% w/ 18/28 precincts reporting. Our estimate says he needs to be within 17% of Moore there. #ALSEN

  99. JC says:

    Moore still has Shelby county which hasn’t reported in. It usual goes 75% GOP and has a high population.

    Of course, Jones still ahs those big \cities that are trickling in – Montgomery and Birmingham

  100. Todd McCain says:

    Paul,

    I thought you were leaving!

  101. BayernFan says:

    I like that NYT site

  102. Waingro says:

    Moore now at 54% in NYTimes model.

  103. BayernFan says:

    NYT Moore 53% chance now

  104. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    80. “Cash Cow TM says: May I be the first to congratulate Senator Jones.”

    When I worked on a dairy, always discouraged the cows from making political predictions.

    If Moore does squeak out a win, hope it humbles him enough to end the political bravado and extreme statements. Doubt it, but can hope.

  105. BayernFan says:

    make that 54%

  106. Todd McCain says:

    Moore now up 10.

  107. Marv says:

    Big jump for Moore, leads by 10 pts.

  108. Paul says:

    There’s nearly 300,000 votes still to come in from Birmingham. It will be close.

  109. Waingro says:

    Moore now up by 10 points.

  110. BayernFan says:

    slow count only 10% in

  111. Tina says:

    Jebot building paper planes.

  112. Waingro says:

    Now up 12.

  113. JC says:

    BayernFan says:
    December 12, 2017 at 8:56 pm

    I like that NYT site
    ————–

    Yeah. I have to give NYT credit, they definitely have the best election results format on the internet.

  114. BayernFan says:

    NYT Moore 57% chance

  115. Waingro says:

    Woah. Now Moore lead down to 2. What a roller coaster.

  116. lisab says:

    moore +2

  117. BayernFan says:

    54%

  118. jason says:

    Moore is going to win.

    Let the bashing begin.

  119. Todd McCain says:

    Must have been a big city vote dump.

  120. Todd McCain says:

    Josh Kraushaar??Verified account? @HotlineJosh · 28s28 seconds ago

    ? More

    Big vote dump in Jefferson Co (Birmingham) narrows Moore lead to 1.5 pts // and reduces his projected win under 1 pt (via NYT)

  121. JC says:

    It’ll be Montgomery and Birmingham vs Shelby and the combined rural votes.

  122. Waingro says:

    Model down to 52% Moore.

  123. BayernFan says:

    nyt now says tossup. lol

    maybe we should just count the votes?

  124. BayernFan says:

    Jefferson stuck on 15% in

  125. VictrC says:

    Ok this is crazy. Flying to London, took off and Jones was killing it, now I look at it and Moore is leading. Markets are all over the place, I honestly can say that I believe no one really knows how this ends right now.

    I was reflecting while taking off, and I find Moore to be someone I would not support in a primary ever. Has nothing to do with his penchant for younger women 40 years ago, I just think he goes too far on a number of positions, but while in the air I was thinking about how bad a Sen. Jones from Alabama would be for the nation. It would give talking points to the left and could cause good conservatives to lose close races because of the perception the nation was moving far left.

    We have had enough of Obama and Clinton and Liberal mantra for the past 8 years, the country can not afford it any longer. My children’s future depends on it. So…reluctantly I hope Moore wins and then is never seated.

  126. Bitterlaw says:

    MichiganGuy says:

    December 12, 2017 at 8:05 pm

    Jason, that should say “MG is proud of a man of God who believes in defending God’s Law even if, it cost him his job.”

    LET’S SEE HOW MG DANCES AWAY FROM THE OBVIOUS COMPARISON:

    Jason, that should say “MG is proud of a man of Allah who believes in defending Allah’s Law even if, it cost him his job.”

  127. Waingro says:

    Wtf?

    “NEW: A fake document purporting to show allegations of sexual harassment against Chuck Schumer was shared with reporters. Schumer has gone to the police”

    https://twitter.com/axios/status/940761304029171714

  128. Todd McCain says:

    Moore back to 5 points ahead.

  129. lisab says:

    nyt now says tossup. lol

    maybe we should just count the votes?
    ———————

    they were great on election night

    when the networks still had hillary winning, the statisticians were playing it straight. they called it for trump way before the anchors

  130. Todd McCain says:

    Exactly. NYT said HRC had a 99% chance to win…..

  131. BayernFan says:

    nyt Moore 54%

  132. DW says:

    close race. go either way

  133. Todd McCain says:

    Moore isn’t going to perform the same margins as Trump….its not going to happen.

  134. lisab says:

    robbie staying away … does not want a repeat of election night

  135. BayernFan says:

    whats the holdup in birmingham?

  136. BayernFan says:

    nyt tossup. lol

  137. Todd McCain says:

    Moore back up to 8 points ahead.

  138. BayernFan says:

    now jones 52%

  139. VictrC says:

    Bayern….waiting to see how many votes they will need to prop up Jones.

  140. BayernFan says:

    Birmingham is sandbagging

  141. Tom says:

    140 – Dems. are trying to figure out how many votes they need to manufacture.

  142. BayernFan says:

    great minds vic…..

  143. Redmen4ever says:

    Houston Co. in SE corner of the state is now fully reported.

    In 2016, it was +57 for Trump, as compared to +28 statewide.

    In this election, it’s +23 for Moore. Extrapolating for this one country, Moore wins by 4 points.

  144. dblaikie says:

    No matter what happens Luther Strange will be the Senator of Alabama in 2018 if the charges against Moore hold up. He will beat either Moore or Jones. No way a pro-abortion candidate will survive for long in Alabama.

  145. BayernFan says:

    nyt jones 56%

  146. BayernFan says:

    57% jones

  147. BayernFan says:

    67%

  148. Bitterlaw says:

    Breaking News – Polls in East St. Louis will stay open until midnight to allow more votes for Jones.

  149. VictrC says:

    Is the seat up for election again in 2018? If so why on earth have a special election with a year on the term left. Why not just wait for the actual next election. This has been flubbed since the beginning by the Alabama GOP

  150. Cash Cow TM says:

    Two words:

    Birmingham
    Montgomery

  151. BayernFan says:

    vic yup

  152. Waingro says:

    77% Jones?!

  153. BayernFan says:

    Jones 76%. stick a fork in this?

  154. Bitterlaw says:

    MG – God better get to work. Moore might need some help to close it out.

  155. lisab says:

    nyt predicting jones

  156. BayernFan says:

    or keep counting votes? lol

  157. Tina says:

    Moore up 23k votes

  158. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    155. Agree

  159. Paul says:

    I think whoever wins fills the remainder of Sessions term which ends in 2020.

  160. Redmen4ever says:

    Randolph Co. in mid eastern border of the state is now fully reported.

    In 2016, it was +53 for Trump, again compared to +28 statewide.

    In this elections it’s +31 for Moore. This projects to a 6 point Moore win.

    Moore is doing what he has to do to win in the Trump counties. Let’s see if Jones does what he has to do in the Hillary counties.

  161. Todd McCain says:

    NYT model may have moved on an error:

    Wow. Russell County just completed and Jones beat our estimate by 14 points. It’s a 40% black county.
    I almost wonder whether that will prove to be an error.
    If it’s not, as our model assumes, then Jones looks good.

  162. DW says:

    biggest population centers mostly still out — Jones in good shape

  163. Paul says:

    A lot to still come in from Birmingham, Montgomery and Mobile.

  164. Paul says:

    NYT now has Jones at 75% chance on win.

  165. DW says:

    Phil and I first to sound the alarm that Moore was in trouble in early results

  166. Waingro says:

    The MAGA’s are starting to meltdown on Hannity.

  167. phoenixrisen says:

    This one is going to be close. I had Moore winning by 5. Going to be a nailbiter it looks like.

  168. Redmen4ever says:

    Jones is beating the pants off Moore in Jefferson Co. One year ago, Hillary carried the county but only by 7 points. Jones is carrying the county by 59 points. If this margin holds up, that’s a huge advantage for Jones. I wonder, though, how homogeneous is Jefferson Co., and if the early reporting precincts here will prove representative of later reporting precincts.

  169. Todd McCain says:

    Moore +25,000 (6%) and 43% in

  170. BayernFan says:

    Moore’s lead increases to 25,000

  171. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    Moore was a total oddball. No one should be too surprised. Bannon’s reputation is sunk.

  172. Todd McCain says:

    173. It is a good question.

    It isn’t very homogenous at all; the city center is DEM, but the outlying suburbs are very GOP.

  173. BayernFan says:

    here comes Jefferson

  174. Bitterlaw says:

    I switched around the channels. MSNBC has the best map analyst. Of course, you have to deal with Maddow.

  175. phoenixrisen says:

    #143 — Watch out for vote dumps where the votes from one side report, and then the tally of the other side reports. Still, Jones doing pretty well.

  176. Robbie says:

    Steve Bannon is a political genius. He took a state Republicans win by 25 or so and found a candidate who turned it into a tossup.

    Yay?

  177. BayernFan says:

    nyt jones 85%

  178. phoenixrisen says:

    Sorry, meant #173

  179. Waingro says:

    86%for Jones on NYT!?

  180. BayernFan says:

    89%

  181. BayernFan says:

    90%

  182. BayernFan says:

    back down to 80%

  183. Todd McCain says:

    50% in and Moore up 4.

  184. Bitterlaw says:

    Robbie is here and MG has gone silent. What does that tell you about the state of the race so far?

  185. BayernFan says:

    Moore’s lead increases to 26,000 votes

  186. phoenixrisen says:

    I have to agree though, those Jefferson County numbers are eye-popping

  187. lisab says:

    i believe the nyt, jones has a big advantage

  188. Cash Cow TM says:

    You still got a 100K net votes for Jones in Birmingham and another 100K net Jones votes coming from Montgomery.

    Moore will not win.
    Moore will get less.

    This election was a lose-lose to me.

  189. TrumpIsPeteWilson says:

    Moore is getting the margins he needs in white rural counties (not that much vote-switching there) but not the turnout.

    “The three, white, GOP counties have fallen far short of our turnout estimates–including two under 75% of our estimates.”

    Is it happening? I was so looking forward to seeing non-stop campaign ads about the GOP seating a pedophile to help them barely pass for a tax-bill with a 30% approval rating.

  190. phoenixrisen says:

    Moore up by 6, 54.5% reporting per Politico

  191. Todd McCain says:

    He is up 6 points with 55% in; let’s count the votes.

  192. Tina says:

    Moore up 7

  193. BayernFan says:

    Moore’s lead increases to 40,000

  194. Tina says:

    7 with 56 percent in….

  195. Diamond Jim says:

    CC

  196. Redmen4ever says:

    I now have a Hillary Co., Perry in the mid SW. It voted Hillary +56 last year, and came in +58 for Jones today.

    BUT here is a potential key: Number of votes for Jones (3,138) dropped off just a tad from the number for Hillary (3,824). The Democrats got their vote out in this county.

    In comparison, the drop off of votes from Trump (30,728) to Moore (14,796) in Houston Co. was substantial.

  197. Waingro says:

    Now down to 71% Jones.

  198. Robbie says:

    The Moore lead is either important or built on quicksand depending on where the remaining vote is.

    Thirty minutes ago, I thought Moore had this.

  199. Todd McCain says:

    Moore up 7 with 56% in.

  200. Paul says:

    It will be sad that the Dems can’t run the pedophile ads. But a Senate seat until 2020 will be a nice consolation prize 🙂

  201. Bitterlaw says:

    If Jones wins, I will have correctly picked the winner of the Virginia Governor’s race and the Alabama Senate race. This was in opposition to most of HHR. I hate when Democrats win but even I can make correct predictions.

  202. BayernFan says:

    42,000 vote lead

  203. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    181. “Steve Bannon is a political genius. He took a state Republicans win by 25 or so and found a candidate who turned it into a tossup.”

    For once, Robbie and I totally agree. Bannon just cost the Republicans a senate seat.

  204. Bitterlaw says:

    I will be happy to be wrong on Alabama.

  205. BayernFan says:

    47,000 vote lead

  206. Tina says:

    7 point kead, 59in

  207. God says:

    Would somebody tell Michigan Guy to stop bothering me? I really do not care who wins an election.

  208. phoenixrisen says:

    Moore +7, 60% in. Jefferson still about 2/3 outstanding, Montgomery hardly counted. This is going to be close.

  209. Tina says:

    Still 7 with 62percent.

  210. Waingro says:

    65% Jones.

  211. BayernFan says:

    hope the gop has watchers and lawyers in Birmingham

  212. BayernFan says:

    49,000 vote lead

  213. Todd McCain says:

    50,000 vote lead.

  214. Robbie says:

    If Jones wins, the black vote will have won it for him. Glad Steve Bannon found a guy who reminded the African American voters of George Wallace.

  215. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    209. “I will be happy to be wrong on Alabama.”

    Your not going to be.

  216. Tina says:

    Lawyahs?

  217. VictrC says:

    Amen San Diego, its hard to believe that Alabama will have an ultra liberal senator for three years. But hey…conservatives were sent a message by moderate GOP members right.

    The only good that comes from this is that Bannon is discredited. Hopefully the rest of America sees that as we struggle to try to retain any semblance of order in the next few years. I guess eight years of Obama destructions wasn’t enough.

  218. Todd McCain says:

    Bullock County, black belt, all in – Jones 80-19. Vance (D) 79-21 in 2012. Total votes about two-thirds of 2012 (presidential year) total.

  219. phoenixrisen says:

    Shelby about 2/3 still to be counted. Oh goodness, these heavy key Dem counties are fun to watch. It’s like watching Wisconsin and the slow reporting Dane and Milwaukee counties 😉

  220. BayernFan says:

    over 50,000

  221. Tina says:

    Oore almost 51000

  222. Waingro says:

    The NYTimes needle seems impossible to square with current results.

  223. BayernFan says:

    they are banking on about a 65,000 additional vote margin for jones to come in from Jefferson

  224. Redmen4ever says:

    Perry Co. in the southern part of the state is now in. It’s a competitive county. Trump only carried it by 14 points last year. Moore did fine, carrying it by 0.4 points.

    Republican drop-off from 5,795 to 3,276
    Democrat drop-off 4,332 to 3,244

    The Democrat drop-off was less, and that’s why Jones came close to carrying this county.

    I’m thinking this race will be determined by the late-reporting precincts in Jefferson Co.

  225. BayernFan says:

    51,000

  226. phoenixrisen says:

    229 — Bayern, if they are banking on that, that is a very heavy lift.

  227. Waingro says:

    “We think that the preponderance of the remaining vote is in Democratic-leaning areas”

    https://twitter.com/nate_cohn/status/940773207979765760

  228. mnw says:

    When Moore won the primary, nobody knew about the sex allegations. Nobody. Can’t blame the voters— they didn’t sign up for what this election turned into.

    I don’t care about “he got impeached twice.” That would have made no difference in the ultimate outcome absent the sex allegations.

    The sex allegations were a black swan. Fortunes of war.

  229. BayernFan says:

    also mobile and Madison have a lot out for jones

  230. Bitterlaw says:

    JC and NYC have also gone silent. Uh oh. Bad sign for Moore when the cheerleaders leave the gym.

  231. BayernFan says:

    55,000 vote lead

  232. BayernFan says:

    dem counties are sandbagging big time

  233. Waingro says:

    “Another strong Jones turnout in the Black Belt: Bullock Co., where turnout is 72% of presidential. Not seeing comparable in Moore zones. #ALSEN”

    https://twitter.com/redistrict/status/940773527883534336

  234. phoenixrisen says:

    65% in, Moore up 8, almost 52,000 vote lead

  235. BayernFan says:

    56,000

  236. Todd McCain says:

    65% in.

  237. Bitterlaw says:

    I wonder if the 3 lawyer ambulance chasing firm has filed that defamation suit for Moore yet.

  238. Waingro says:

    NYT down to 62% Jones.

  239. NYCmike says:

    GFY Bitterlaw. I knew it would be close. No need to comment when I don’t know what will happen.

  240. phoenixrisen says:

    Tina and Bayern are right, my math is off

  241. Tina says:

    8 point kead.

  242. lisab says:

    The sex allegations were a black swan. Fortunes of war.
    —————————-

    assuming jones wins

    this will be the new normal

  243. BayernFan says:

    58,000

  244. Tina says:

    68000 vote lead?

  245. NYCmike says:

    Hoping jason’s One vote margin is correct!

  246. mnw says:

    I’m in the gym, altho I don’t think I was ever a Moore cheerleader. I certainly regarded his election as the most preferable outcome.

  247. Tina says:

    58000 sorry.

  248. BayernFan says:

    will it be enough?

  249. Robbie says:

    Normally, an 8 point lead with almost two thirds of the vote counted would be hard to beat.

  250. phoenixrisen says:

    58,000 vote lead now, 67% in.

  251. BayernFan says:

    60,000 now

  252. Tina says:

    Almost 9 points now.

  253. BayernFan says:

    fishy

  254. phoenixrisen says:

    60,000 vote lead, 68% in. Going to be tough for Jones now.

  255. BayernFan says:

    here we go…. Jefferson coming in

  256. Robbie says:

    This was always Bannon’s game. He wins both ways. All he wants to do is sell anger and recrimination.

    James Oliphant?
    @jamesoliphant

    Bannon’s folks have told me that they’ll have no problem blaming McConnell if Moore loses because MM didn’t lift a finger for Moore.

  257. Todd McCain says:

    The Peter Stzrok texts were obtained.

    He called her GOD HILLARY……

  258. Tina says:

    DOwn to 5.

  259. BayernFan says:

    38000 Jeff 50% in

  260. phoenixrisen says:

    Jefferson vote dump, Moore lead down to 5, 38,000 vote lead now

  261. BayernFan says:

    Madison popped to 70 in

  262. BayernFan says:

    will it be enough

  263. Waingro says:

    #263, Robbie the MAGA’s on Hannity were already tumpeting that earlier.

  264. Todd McCain says:

    72% in and ahead 38K

  265. BayernFan says:

    do the dems have the votes in their back pocket?

  266. Tina says:

    Please tell me that pete the cheat did not refer to her thighness as a deity

    The fbi is phiqed up

  267. phoenixrisen says:

    Baldwin and Shelby still 2/3 out for Moore, Jefferson half in and Montgomery hardly reporting for Jones. This looks like a toss-up.

  268. BayernFan says:

    39,000

  269. Todd McCain says:

    72% in and still ahead 5.

  270. VictrC says:

    Where are yall getting results CNN is behind you

  271. phoenixrisen says:

    Also Escambia is still hardly in but that is a Moore county. Very tight race.

  272. BayernFan says:

    look at post 222

  273. phoenixrisen says:

    1/3 of Montgomery reported, Moore up 2.5 now, 21000 vote lead, 75% in.

  274. Todd McCain says:

    CNN is way behind on the votes. NYT site is most up to date.

  275. BayernFan says:

    Montgomery is also out only 38 in

  276. VictrC says:

    got it. Thanks Bayern

  277. BayernFan says:

    25,000

  278. BayernFan says:

    will be close

  279. phoenixrisen says:

    Mobile is still out too. Think the edge has to be toward Jones right now.

  280. Redmen4ever says:

    As I thought, the numbers are less lopsided in Jefferson Co. that they were a half hour ago. Last year, Hillary carried the county by 7 points. For Jones to carry the county by 59 points would be amazing.

    I suspect the NYT model projects at the county level, not the precinct level. If so, the lopsided early reporting precincts might be tilting their statewide projection.

  281. BayernFan says:

    24,000

  282. BayernFan says:

    is a game of chicken going on?

  283. Tina says:

    Barris negative still.

  284. Robbie says:

    This is going to be the Scott Brown 2010 win for Democrats. If you haven’t already figured things out, Virginia and Alabama are pretty good evidence 2018 is going to be a tsunami for Democrats. I’d say today it’s a good bet the House AND the Senate flip. Trump’s unpopularity is a lead weight for Republicans.

  285. BayernFan says:

    26,000

  286. mnw says:

    Who is Barris?

    I think the amusing game show host passed away.

  287. Waingro says:

    #292, lol.

  288. Marv says:

    CNN numbers are ahead of the NYT site.

    Moore 50.7
    Jones 47.9

    Leads by 26335

  289. Greymarch says:

    Jones has this locked up. All the outstanding votes are in the counties with the largest cities. Cities = black voters.

    Oh well. Moore losing isnt the end of the world. I wont feel bad when Jones wins. Keeping a child-molester out of the senate isnt exactly a horrible result.

  290. Tina says:

    Richard Barris, people pundit Daily polling head, most accurate firm in 2016.

  291. lisab says:

    I’d say today it’s a good bet the House AND the Senate flip. Trump’s unpopularity is a lead weight for Republicans.
    —————————-

    then it is likely trump will be impeached

  292. Diamond Jim says:

    CCC

  293. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    But Bannon already has a strategy to redeem himself. He can run off to Utah, and support 84 year old Senator Hatch, and stop a Romney candidacy.

    Of course 78% of Utah voters want Hatch to retire, and his likely Democratic opponent leads him in the polls (versus Romney who would win the seat by about 70% of the vote). But it would be a moral victory for Bannon.

  294. Waingro says:

    Down to 63% for Jones.

  295. Todd McCain says:

    26K lead with 77% in; just seems like too many DEM areas left.

  296. BayernFan says:

    27,000

  297. Chicon says:

    Robbie in his element – doom.

  298. mnw says:

    You can tell the relatively honest trolls from the scum because the former say “alleged.”

  299. BayernFan says:

    23000 Madison up to 78 in

  300. Bogdan says:

    If Hillary only won Jefferson County by 7 pts, and Jones has such a big lead now in Jefferson, could the remaining votes to be counted in that county be for Moore, or at least close to even?

  301. BayernFan says:

    25,000 lead

  302. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    292. “I’d say today it’s a good bet the House AND the Senate flip. Trump’s unpopularity is a lead weight for Republicans.”

    Trump is not the issue in Alabama. Its having one of the worst candidates the Republicans have ever nominated. Trump endorsed his opponent.

  303. Robbie says:

    Chicon says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:00 pm
    Robbie in his element – doom.

    – Unlike many here, I’m not interested in pretending ground beef is filet.

  304. Todd McCain says:

    80% in and Moore ahead by 26K.

  305. Waingro says:

    “Without better numbers from Election Day voters in Mobile and Jefferson, Jones wins by 20K. Still NOT making a call.”

    https://twitter.com/winwithjmc/status/940778324443373568

  306. BayernFan says:

    Jefferson dump

  307. phoenixrisen says:

    Montgomery and Jefferson almost half in, Shelby, Escambia, and Baldwin still 2/3 to be counted which is Moore country, Mobile is a little over 1/4 in which is slight Jones. This looks very, very tight.

  308. BayernFan says:

    9000

  309. Chicon says:

    311 – you’re happiest when predicting doom.

  310. Tina says:

    Hopefully, mitchie does not seat the drat right away.

  311. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:02 pm
    292. “I’d say today it’s a good bet the House AND the Senate flip. Trump’s unpopularity is a lead weight for Republicans.”
    Trump is not the issue in Alabama. Its having one of the worst candidates the Republicans have ever nominated. Trump endorsed his opponent.

    – You can always point to a local factor, but the overarching feature of all of the special elections this year and the Virginia gubernatorial election is significantly depressed Republican turnout. That is clearly associated with Trump’s high unpopularity.

  312. BayernFan says:

    6000

  313. Waingro says:

    Wow. Moore lead now less than 1 point.

  314. mnw says:

    I agree with San Diego. Trump had no luck at all in this one. He may get some credit among Congressional GOP for fighting like a wounded grizzly, though.

  315. Tina says:

    Trumps popularity is well over 50percent in alabama.

  316. VictrC says:

    Watch the 15,000 jackasses who wrote someone in be the ones who hand Pelosi and Schumer the win tongiht and help perpetuate the mantra that Americans want ultra liberals.

    Sometimes I really beleive people can not see the bigger picture. Having a Dem House and Senate Is BAD FOR AMERICA. All those wishing for that here, should think about what kind of world their children, my children will grow up in.

  317. Todd McCain says:

    Jones just took the lead.

  318. TrumpIsPeteWilson says:

    SENATOR JONES. DAMN IT SOUNDS SO GOOD.

  319. Robbie says:

    Chicon says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:04 pm
    311 – you’re happiest when predicting doom.

    – No. I’d much rather be celebrating a win, but I’m not going to tell myself fairy tales.

    The warning signs have been there since last February. People chose to ignore them. I did not.

  320. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    319.. There were also five congressional special elections which the Republican candidates won. You too much in the doom mode again.

  321. Robbie says:

    Tina says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:05 pm
    Trumps popularity is well over 50percent in alabama.

    – Except the exit polls showed his approval rating was 48%.

  322. BayernFan says:

    4000

  323. Bitterlaw says:

    If Moore was one of those new leaders that JC was counting on to lead a conservative revolution…..ummm….no.

  324. Chicon says:

    319 – I suspect if JEB! were President, you’d be talking about what a bad candidate Moore is, and those deadenders.

  325. Tina says:

    53 percent in the one i saw.

  326. phoenixrisen says:

    Looks like this should be called for Jones. Looks like he wins by 2-3

  327. TrumpIsPeteWilson says:

    I FORGOT ABOUT TRUMP. HE PUT EVERYTHING ON THE LINE FOR A PEDOPHILE LOL. AND GOT TOASTED.

    The SENATE IS UP FOR GRABS. ARIZONA. NEVADA. TENNESSEE.

    LET’S HOPE TRUMP CAMPAIGNS FOR THE REPUGS THERE TOO LOL.

    EAT SH*T AND DIE LOSERS.

  328. BayernFan says:

    5000

  329. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    327. “– No. I’d much rather be celebrating a win, but I’m not going to tell myself fairy tales.”

    On this one, do not thing you would have wanted to celebrate. There may be some benefit to actually not having this total clown in the Senate.

  330. Waingro says:

    Jones is going to win.

  331. Robbie says:

    Chicon says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:07 pm
    319 – I suspect if JEB! were President, you’d be talking about what a bad candidate Moore is, and those deadenders.

    – Moore is a terrible candidate. But it’s also true to say Trump’s unpopularity added fuel to this fire.

    But if you want to explain this all away and pretend everything is fine, be my guest.

  332. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:08 pm
    327. “– No. I’d much rather be celebrating a win, but I’m not going to tell myself fairy tales.”
    On this one, do not thing you would have wanted to celebrate. There may be some benefit to actually not having this total clown in the Senate.

    – Well, I meant celebrate the victory of a competent candidate.

  333. Just Fill Out The Census says:

    Come on Alabama! Put an end to the years of political embarrassment!

  334. Wes says:

    Well, Democrats win in Alabama for the first time in 25 years.

    Thank you, Steve Bannon!

  335. Waingro says:

    #335, thanks for the drive by visit, troll.

  336. Chicon says:

    Robbie, if Strange were on the ballot tonight – as Trump asked for – what are the results?

  337. Redmen4ever says:

    Dallas Co. has yet to report. It’s one of the black belt rural counties and was big for Hillary.

    Roy is down to hoping the late-reporting precincts in Jefferson, Montgomery and Mobile (Democrat counties) are favorable to him. There aren’t enough votes still out in the Republican counties.

  338. Tina says:

    TOo close, i need limoncello now.

  339. Wes says:

    Robbie says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:08 pm
    Chicon says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:07 pm
    319 – I suspect if JEB! were President, you’d be talking about what a bad candidate Moore is, and those deadenders.

    – Moore is a terrible candidate. But it’s also true to say Trump’s unpopularity added fuel to this fire.

    But if you want to explain this all away and pretend everything is fine, be my guest.

    This is factually incorrect. Moore had few if any problems with Jones until the sex allegations.

  340. Todd McCain says:

    Right, Robbie’s go to is always to blame Trump.

    Trump endorsed and campaigned for Strange….

  341. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    There were those of us who thought Moore should have been removed from the ballot by the Alabama GOP. It was a foreseeable train wreck.

  342. Robbie says:

    Chicon says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:10 pm
    Robbie, if Strange were on the ballot tonight – as Trump asked for – what are the results?

    – Strange would have won easily, but the race would have played out far differently. Moore’s molestation brought Trump’s own past into play.

  343. Tina says:

    What team memebers said that todd, pete the cheat!

  344. BayernFan says:

    tough

  345. Wes says:

    Where’s Elmer Gantry? He supported this disaster wholeheartedly.

  346. Tina says:

    Strange would have won this.

  347. mnw says:

    I don’t think Bannon can be blamed either. Not unless Bannon had some advance knowledge of the sex allegations, Wes.

  348. Tina says:

    He got screwed by the pmueller ocess, an election next year with big luthor

  349. VictrC says:

    and if you want to know why we need to protect this country Liberals you just need to read pete wilson. That is the prototypical Liberal Dem voter. If you don’t agree with them lockstep you should die.

    I hope Conservatives awaken and realize that even with Trump’s negatives, the economy is in good shape and it absolutely would not be if Hillary were President. Taxes would be up, spending would be up, our standing overseas would be crushed, and the economy would be crushed.

  350. Chicon says:

    349 – did I do so, wes?

  351. TrumpIsPeteWilson says:

    DON’T WORRY GUYS. IF ALABAMA IS IN PLAY, THERE’S STILL A HANDFUL OF STATES THAT ARE MORE REPUBLICAN.

    YOU BET ON A PEDOPHILE AND LOST JUST LIKE TRUMP DID.

    WHAT HAPPENS TO PEOPLE WHO TRADE IN THEIR PRINCIPLES FOR POWER AND STILL END UP WITH NEITHER?

    WE’LL FIND OUT IN 2018.

  352. BayernFan says:

    this is why if the GOP had the votes, it needed to act quickly on ACA, the wall, etc. Tax reform is iffy now.

  353. Robbie says:

    Todd McCain says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:11 pm
    Right, Robbie’s go to is always to blame Trump.
    Trump endorsed and campaigned for Strange….

    – When a president has an approval rating around 35%, it’s going to be a black cloud for his party. His standing with the voters did not help Moore even though Moore blew himself up.

  354. Tina says:

    House should just accept senate tax version. I think its better than the house overall, while not oerfect.

  355. lisab says:

    Having a Dem House and Senate Is BAD FOR AMERICA.
    ——————————————-

    maybe … but the people voted and can vote again in 2020

  356. Paul says:

    Where’s Polaris?

  357. Wes says:

    I can blame Bannon because he foisted a serial chronic underperformer on the GOP, Mnw.

    It’s not as if it wasn’t clear for years Moore was an unliked sanctimonious theocrat. This election just happened to be when his personal unpopularity combined with other factors to take him out.

  358. Bitterlaw says:

    Wes – MG is still trying to figure out why God let him down tonight.

  359. TrumpIsPeteWilson says:

    I WELCOME DOUG JONES AND HIS 30% ACU RATING LOSAH.

    YOU WANTED TO ELECT A F*CKING PEDOPHILE TO THE SENATE AND YOU ARE SAYING DEMS ARE ABSOLUTIONIST?

    YOU ARE TRULY F*CKING DELUSIONAL.

  360. Robbie says:

    mnw says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:12 pm
    I don’t think Bannon can be blamed either. Not unless Bannon had some advance knowledge of the sex allegations, Wes.

    – Bannon was the one who convinced Trump not to dump Moore. He told Trump the base would be angry at him if he turned on Moore.

  361. Tom says:

    137 – Even without the sex allegations Roy Moore was a terribly flawed candidate. For all his supposed intellect, Bannon looks like a complete moron on this one.

  362. Chicon says:

    357 – mnw, Bannon backed a guy who, as chief of the Supreme Court, told the us supreme court to eff off.

  363. phoenixrisen says:

    #364 — I don’t see much difference between the House and Senate versions of tax reform Tina. The conference shouldn’t be that difficult.

  364. phoenixrisen says:

    #369 — LOL Eph!

  365. Wes says:

    Chicon, everything above the last line in 349 is Robbie’s words. The final line is my response to him.

  366. Waingro says:

    Dead tie now.

  367. Tina says:

    Well the senate strikes the indivudka mandate. Rand went wobbly and i am sure that the drat senators feom az want to phuq things up, as will mullah corker.

  368. Todd McCain says:

    Yep, I said previously the only good thing about a Moore loss would be it gets Bannon out. He will be persona non grata.

    Akin, O’Donnell, Buck, Mourdock, Akin…enough is enough.

  369. phoenixrisen says:

    Race is basically tied now.

  370. mnw says:

    I disagree. The sex allegations turned the election around. Moore with all his baggage was winning before the sex allegations.

  371. Waingro says:

    Jones in lead. It’s Ovah.

  372. Paul says:

    Jones has pulled back ahead.

  373. lisab says:

    is eph pete wilson?

  374. jason says:

    I hope the deadenders learn a lesson.

    I don’t think they will.

    Maybe the voters will stop listening to them however.

  375. Robbie says:

    Wes says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:15 pm
    Chicon, everything above the last line in 349 is Robbie’s words. The final line is my response to him.

    – He was up by about half the amount you might expect of a typical Republican. He would have won absent the sex scandal, but his awfulness and depressed Republicans due to Trump’s standing played a role.

  376. Todd McCain says:

    Yep, we gave up another one.

  377. Wes says:

    I’m going to ream Elmer Gantry up one side and down the other when he next shows up, Bitter.

    He told us Roy Moore was invincible.

    I guess he looked up the archaic word for “vulnerable” and accidentally added two letters to it.

  378. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    345. “Robbie, if Strange were on the ballot tonight – as Trump asked for – what are the results?”

    Agree. Strange would have cruised to victory. This is like the tea party movement forcing the nomination of unelectable candidates all over again.

  379. Just Fill Out The Census says:

    Steven Bannon=LOSER!

  380. Paul says:

    Is NYT getting the results five minutes ahead of everyone else?

  381. Tina says:

    Baris calls it for jones.

  382. jason says:

    Most of the vote out is from the Jones counties, Jefferson, Mobile, Montgomery.

    It will be like a 2% difference.

  383. Wes says:

    He was still winning, Robbie. Trump little if any effect here. It was all Roy Moore.

    Virginia–yes, definitely Trump.

    Alabama–not a chance.

  384. Robbie says:

    I wonder if this will knock some sense in to Trump about what he’s been doing and about Steve Bannon, or will he double down on the man who blows unlosable races.

  385. Waingro says:

    CNN now ahead of NYTimes.

  386. BayernFan says:

    hold the phone

  387. jason says:

    I WELCOME DOUG JONES AND HIS 30% ACU RATING LOSAH. ”

    He will only last a year so enjoy it while you can.

  388. Wes says:

    Jason, Jones will be up in 2020.

  389. Tina says:

    This is on roy moore, not trump, as wes suggests.

    The guy refused to listen to 2 court orders. I am conservstive as they come by, but wtf.

  390. Diamond Jim says:

    CD

  391. jason says:

    Yep, Trump has nothing to do with this.

    He endorsed the right candidate.

    Bannon and the deadenders own this.

  392. Redmen4ever says:

    In defense of Steve Bannon, he tried to rescue a candidate who was quite the odd fellow, when that candidate was abandoned by the party establishment, and outspent in the primary and the special by $60 million. The allegations against him were credible because he’s so odd. I’m sorry, life isn’t fair when you’re goofy. I have a rule: only break one law. People can respect a person who stands his ground on something important to them. But, Moore was twice removed from the Alabama State Supreme Court. Trump was correct to support Strange in the primary; and, because there was so much on the line, he and Bannon were right to support Moore in the special.

    To the Democrat’s credit, they have an awesome get out the vote machine and have a tremendous advantage in off-year elections.

    I think this is the end of the line for bills and perhaps also for court nominations. Already thin margin of 2 votes will be down to 1 when this session is over, with several of our members being weak. Hopefully, the Republicans can pass the budget and the tax cut.

  393. jason says:

    Ok sorry, 3 years

  394. Wes says:

    I hope the ALGOP sends Kay Ivey packing next year.

    Where’s Mikey?

    He told us Moore had to win for his accusers to have justice.

    I guess Alabamans didn’t agree.

  395. lisab says:

    writeins make the difference

  396. Tina says:

    Trump went all out for big luthor too.

  397. Tgca says:

    Drudge called it for Dems

  398. Tina says:

    And mitchie ahould not seat him until 2018. Pass the phuqin tax bill.

  399. Waingro says:

    Jones up 10,000 votes

  400. jason says:

    he guy refused to listen to 2 court orders.”

    Hey, according to MG he was listening to God.

    Did God lose the election too?

  401. lisab says:

    Already thin margin of 2 votes will be down to 1 when this session is over, with several of our members being weak.
    ———————————

    the winner tonight was mccain

    the loser was franken

    the dems need him gone to go after trump

  402. Waingro says:

    Fox calls it For Jones

  403. Wes says:

    I guess so, Jason.

    Steve Bannon did the impossible. Maybe this will wake up real Republicans and end Bannon’s reign of terror in the primaries.

  404. Robbie says:

    Tina says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:21 pm
    This is on roy moore, not trump, as wes suggests.
    The guy refused to listen to 2 court orders. I am conservstive as they come by, but wtf.

    – All Trump had to say was he wanted the governor to postpone the race and she would have. He stuck with Moore when everyone else in the party didn’t want him. Trump helped make this happen.

  405. Tina says:

    NUnes orders investigators to seize doj documents, so ebody needs to lead that department if sessions checked out and let rosenstein kead it

  406. jason says:

    In defense of Steve Bannon, he tried to rescue a candidate who was quite the odd fellow, when that candidate was abandoned by the party establishment, and outspent in the primary and the special by $60 million.”

    Why would he want to “rescue” this idiot.

    He wasn’t just odd, he tried to create his own laws.

    He shouldn’t even had been allowed to run.

  407. Waingro says:

    AP calls it.

  408. Tina says:

    That person refused to extend it. Do not re write history, mitchie even asked her to and she said no.

  409. Redmen4ever says:

    AP has called election for JOnes.

  410. VictrC says:

    I hope this serves as a wake up calls to Conservatives in 2018. We can not afford to lose winnable races, and we can not afford Liberals to gain control.

    I know its inevitable over time, but I truly lament for my sons. They are 2 and 4 and the America they grow up in will be a very hostile one to them. It is a shame, truly. Tonight is sad because we had to either compromise our principles to elect someone who should never have even been in consideration for a Senate seat (and that is before the allegation of him dating younger girls) or have someone who doesn’t reflect the values of Alabama voters and will vote with Shcumer and Pelosi 100% of the time.

    It is a sad night for America, and a sad night for my sons.

  411. Tina says:

    Luthor was the top cho ie. They could have extended it until next year and ran big luthor.

  412. Bitterlaw says:

    Bannon owns this. Moore was unacceptable when he opposed the rule of law. Bannon could have pushed Moore to drop out when the accusations were made.

    I do not blame the never defined GOP establishment for this at all. Moore and Bannon managed to lose a Senate race in Alabama.

  413. Todd McCain says:

    Disappointing. Luckily, I think Strange is Senator until 2018, so hopefully they can get tax reform done.

  414. Wes says:

    Basically a guy who refused to follow the law wanted to make the law.

    How’d that work out?

  415. mnw says:

    I think it’s possible to read too much into this, in terms of the effect on Congress. They will recognize the black swan here. Trump’s agenda had nothing to do with this.

  416. Tina says:

    Correct victorc, we need to get sheot done in the congress and ditch the 3muh russian investigationa jmto nothing.

  417. lisab says:

    It is a sad night for America, and a sad night for my sons
    ————————-

    start checking the hispanic box for them and have them learn spanish

  418. Bitterlaw says:

    Vic – Moore is not a conservative. He is a Deadenders theocrat with no respect for law.

  419. Tgca says:

    So I guess if Jeb was POTUS and supported Strange then tonight would also be repudiation of Jeb, and proof the GOP elected the wrong guy. Robbie is too funny.

    The people of AL spoke tonight. A good portion of the GOP abandoned Moore, not because of Trump but because of the allegations. Same would have happened with any other GOP POTUS.

  420. Tina says:

    I statd, if I were in alabama, i would not vote for moore, i wanted him to win, but I would not vote for him because of his lack of respect for the law.

  421. Wes says:

    Vic, as I recall, you were a huge Palin. Considering Palin endorsed Roy Moore-style idiots such as Chridtine O’Donnell, she’s part of the reason Republicans hadn’t more of a cushion in the Senate before Jones beat Moore.

  422. jason says:

    He stuck with Moore when everyone else in the party didn’t want him.”

    Stuck with Moore? How?

    He endorsed Strange, you know, another candidate?

    When it was only Moore and Jones, he did the right thing, endorsed Moore, or did you expect him to endorse Jones?

    You really are a stupid moron.

    “Stuck with Moore” is great.. I love this place.

  423. Robbie says:

    Way to go Steve Bannon!

  424. Tina says:

    Ei am sas for big luthor. Screwed.

  425. Tom says:

    I guess the silver lining is that we won’t have the embarrassment of Roy Moore hanging around our necks for the next two years.

  426. Proud Obamacon says:

    Wowwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

  427. Tina says:

    It was too much for moore to ovecome. He made some headwin, but down 10 going in it, fox turned out to be right.

  428. Diamond Jim says:

    Democrats would have done everything possible to get Moore off the ballot if he was their candidate. Republicans never learn that politics is a blood sport.

  429. jason says:

    Vic – Moore is not a conservative. He is a Deadenders theocrat with no respect for law.”

    That’s it…

  430. lisab says:

    mccain is going to vote against everything trump now

    even more than before

    maybe even against judges

  431. Bitterlaw says:

    Ok, bitches. Those who doubted my prediction of a Jones win can either admit that even I can get something right or donate some money to charity. Actually, make the donation.

  432. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:28 pm
    He stuck with Moore when everyone else in the party didn’t want him.”
    Stuck with Moore? How?

    – Do you actually read or watch the news? McConnell and the gang tried desperately to get Trump to call on Moore to quit and ask Ivey to cancel the race. Trump decided to stick with Moore because Bannon told Trump the base was with Moore. Trump sided with Moore and then endorsed him.

  433. Proud Obamacon says:

    Holy fukking sh!t – unfukkingbelievable!!!! AL is not a cesspool after all.

    Great job Alabamans, you made the right choice! Faith in Alabama is restored!

  434. jason says:

    Actually Fox was way off, not even in the MOE.

    Jones won, but nowhere close to 10 points.

  435. Tina says:

    Do not re write, he went with moore the last week, hardly stuck by him.

    Quit lying. Be a happy drat troll, your guy won

  436. Tgca says:

    441 Bitter, remember, a clock is also right twice a day. You need a better track record 1st.

    Hugs and kisses over donations.

  437. jason says:

    rump to call on Moore to quit and ask Ivey to cancel the race.”

    Hey Moron, Ivey didn’t need Trump if she wanted to do that.

    Trump didn’t “stick” with Moore, he endorsed Strange.

    If he had endorsed Moore in the primary, then yes, he would have “stuck” with him.

    You are an idiot.

  438. Tina says:

    Trump only cut an ad for moore a few days ago. Hardly offered any support for 5 plus weeks or aince muh yearbook broke.

    Maybe niw allred will validate the yearbook or attempt to.

  439. VictrC says:

    Bitter – I know, and it was a sickening choice to even have to consider him. It should never have come to this. The election should have been postponed, but we have to wake up. We did it in 2010 and we can do it again. We have to educate people about Liberals and what is coming.

    Tina – I already speak fluent Spanish…lol but if you saw their Mom you would know they won’t get away with it…even speaking spanish. When the weather report says sunny they are already burned 😉

    Again, we have to find a way to unite. I realize that thorughout our history there has been party infighting, but I really underestimated the Pauliac effect on this party. And believe me, many of the people driving this wedge are Pauliacs hoping to destroy the party by creating this division. There has to be a way to unit people like myself and Bitter and NYC with the Robbie’s of the party who are only barely marginal R’s. Reagan was able to do it, we need to find that someone again.

    I think someone said it earlier, if Trump would just stop tweeting Americans would see how good things are right now and some of the good things hes done. As yall know Im all over the world and meet with leaders of lots of countries, and despite what the media says, the pro-trump crowd far outweighs those against because they see the economic benefit.

    We have to find a way to come together. And…people need to learn you don’t always get everything you want.

  440. janz says:

    I started to feel, over the weekend, that Jones was gaining momentum with all the heavy campaigning and heavy AA hitters he had stumping for him. Basically, there were just too many people slamming Moore 24/7. I still have doubts about the allegations against him. But, nonetheless, the dems succeeded in smearing his character, and lodging doubts about what kind of man he was. That’s all it takes, sometimes, to turn the tide.

  441. Tgca says:

    444

    Agreed. Fox was not close at all.

  442. Bitterlaw says:

    Jones wins. Wentz out for the season. This week sucks and it is only Tuesday.

  443. Robbie says:

    Expect Democrats to double down the sexual harassment charges on Trump after they worked on Moore.

  444. Tina says:

    Bitterlaw is becoming an ace forecaster here. He has the lucky hand. I need the lotto numbers.

  445. BayernFan says:

    GOP better figure out a way to get its voters to the polls next year. I say enact the senate tax bill asap…..put an infrastructure bill together…..and push for The Wall.

  446. jason says:

    Well, at least we are spared the Moore circus for the next year.

    Because this guy would have been a gift to the Dems that would have kept on giving..and giving…

  447. Bitterlaw says:

    Anybody want to defend dating teens when you are in your 30s? MG?

  448. Tina says:

    Meant faux fot the winner correct. Fox was off of course.

  449. VictrC says:

    BTW for all…Moore is not a conservative. He was a combative fringe extremist who found a way to exploit a flawed candidate and system to get on the ballot.

  450. Tgca says:

    All I can say is thank God Trump was the GOP nominee. If it were Jeb or Marco, we would have POTUS Hillary.

  451. Redmen4ever says:

    Bannon did indeed support Moore in the primary. According to the following article, this was a week after he was bounced out of the White House, and in order to get back at Mitch McConnell.

    http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/08/steve_bannon_to_support_roy_mo.html

  452. Proud Obamacon says:

    Breitbart red flasher: Update: AP Calls for Democrat Jones

    Just wow. Simply delicious. Bannon on suicide watch.

  453. Tina says:

    They know what they need to do. Those 3will help. But will they? Or do they want to lose?

    Rand went wobbly on the tax cut bill.

    I am sure the az aholes will reconsider now their support for the tax bill.

    The rs love losing.

  454. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:33 pm
    rump to call on Moore to quit and ask Ivey to cancel the race.”
    Hey Moron, Ivey didn’t need Trump if she wanted to do that.
    Trump didn’t “stick” with Moore, he endorsed Strange.
    If he had endorsed Moore in the primary, then yes, he would have “stuck” with him.
    You are an idiot.

    – No, you’re the idiot. If Trump told Ivey to cancel, she would have. Ivey was never going to act without Trump’s consent.

  455. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    People are not going to vote for a repulsive person like Moore. A lot of us on the board indicated we could not have voted for him.

    A president should really refrain from appointing sitting members of Congress to his administration, particularly a sitting senator when there is a bare Republican majority in the Senate. They did hold the five open congressional seats, but slipped up on a big one.

  456. Bitterlaw says:

    Tina – It is really easy. Dems are fired up and waging all out war in every race now. HHR is a bubble. We are not normal people here.

  457. jason says:

    , if Trump would just stop tweeting Americans would see how good things are right now”

    He might as well resign if he is going to stop tweeting.

    If he gives the MSM 100% of the news cycle to bash him without defending himself he might as well quit now.

  458. Tgca says:

    457

    Yes. Bitter. Probably a large portion of Americans whose family has been here for 150+ years when it was common for their ancestors to marry young girls to produce and run the household.

  459. Robbie says:

    I’d just say this. If there happen to be a new batch of women who credibly accuse Trump of sexual harassment in this atmosphere, look out.

  460. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:36 pm
    People are not going to vote for a repulsive person like Moore. A lot of us on the board indicated we could not have voted for him.
    A president should really refrain from appointing sitting members of Congress to his administration, particularly a sitting senator when there is a bare Republican majority in the Senate. They did hold the five open congressional seats, but slipped up on a big one.

    – And what’s Trump about to do? Put Tom Cotton in the CIA and open up his Senate seat.

  461. jason says:

    “Ivey was never going to act without Trump’s consent.”

    LOL

    She is the governor. It was her decision. Trump had nothing to do with it. Nada. Zilch.

    In any event, it would not have made a difference if Moore was still going to be the candidate. Postponing the election was not going to help.

  462. CG says:

    Thank you Alabama for doing what had to be done.

    You are lucky to have Senator Richard Shelby representing you, but he deserves great credit for speaking out and saying that his state should reject the unacceptable.

    Fox News was the first to call it! I hope that POS Donald J. Trump savored that moment.

    Screw you Roy Moore… and the horse you rode in on.

  463. janz says:

    As for Trump’s part in it, IMO he took a hit simply because, at the end, he went all in for Moore — especially doing the robocalls.

    It was a risky thing for him to do — putting himself front and center in this election — especially since he could have merely sat this one out and let the politicos go after each other.

    That is a real down side for Trump, in that he doesn’t weight the issues, or fights to get involved with, enough to see the real value of always inserting himself in such controversies.

  464. Tina says:

    Since muh russian is done, muh harasser is co inf out next.

    recycling 2016.

  465. Proud Obamacon says:

    Is it too late to make Alabamans the Time Person of the Year?

  466. Robbie says:

    The best part will be in 2020 when Moore wins the primary again.

  467. jason says:

    If there happen to be a new batch of women who credibly accuse Trump”

    They will have to much better than the present crop of bimbos…

    One says he “almost” kissed her in an elevator, although she didn’t feel harassed or threatened.

    Another said he walked into a dressing room.

    Another said he invited her on his plane, but she didn’t go…

    Of course, you thought the WAPO orchestrated hit job on Moore was credible too…

  468. VictrC says:

    Jason.. True, but there has to be some sort of moderation. All the good things done are just swept away in this hostile environment.

    BTW, if anyone on the board thinks things will change if Trump gets impeached you are sorely mistaken. It doesn’t matter what R will or would be President, they will be mercifully attacked by the media, and the D’s in congress will look to impeach.

    VP Pence, who is a remarkable man that I have had the priviledge to meet, will be crucified if he becomes President, and it will continue that way until a D is President. Then dissent will be, as it was under Obama, unamerican again.

    sigh

  469. Proud Obamacon says:

    Can Jones hit 50%? Getting close …

  470. Todd McCain says:

    McConnell is the one that really bungled this one.

    He went hard on Mo Brooks and buffered Moore and it backfired.

    Trump now has lost twice in backing Strange and Moore.

  471. Tina says:

    One accuser says that trump gave her hismohone number,

    Harrassment for giving a person a phone number, which she called. In an era when chrome grills and bumbers on cars were in vogue.

  472. Tina says:

    It ahould have been big luthor, itxhie shoukd not have gotten involved with his al approval rate at 21percent.

  473. CG says:

    MSNBC is still refusing to call it…

    I look forward to the massive minute by minute media narrative for this election night.

  474. Proud Obamacon says:

    Can’t wait for the Pussy Grabber’s 3AM tweets tonight. I might even stay up that late to read them in real time LOL…..

  475. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    456. “Because this guy would have been a gift to the Dems that would have kept on giving..and giving…”

    Agree with Jason. This guy would have been a daily embarrassment. He likely would have gone off the rails on many votes, and invoked God’s will in opposing many Republican initiatives.

    Plus, expect Bannon to cower after this; if he cannot get a candidate elected in Alabama, where can he?

  476. Tina says:

    Judge contreras recuses himself hours after the bombshell house heaeing where rs demand to see the apparently falsely ontained fisa applicarion, result8ng in the illegal wiretapping.

  477. janz says:

    “Screw you Roy Moore… and the horse you rode in on.”

    I personally liked inserting the “horse” in today’s election. It was folksy and symbolic of his kind of individualism, which has been Moore’s legacy — for better or worse.

  478. Proud Obamacon says:

    Don’t worry, DW is on it! Minute by minute, DW.. LOL

  479. CG says:

    A lot of people share the blame for blowing a Senate seat that should not have even been remotely vulnerable.

    Donald Trump, Steve Bannon, Jeff Sessions, Robert Bentley, Luther Strange, Mo Brooks, Kay Ivey, and especially Roy Moore, this is all on you.

    Congratulations to Mitch McConnell on what has to be a very happy night for him as well as Republicans and conservatives who saw Roy Moore for what he is and always has been and were not willing to sell their soul to excuse it away.

  480. Tina says:

    Drat is happy.

  481. lisab says:

    Basically, there were just too many people slamming Moore 24/7.
    —————————————

    you have not seen anything yet

    every republican candidate will have yearboks coming at them

  482. Proud Obamacon says:

    So the child molestor only wrote a victory speech. What will he say now that he’s gotten his sorry predatory @ss whooped by the good guys?

    Good over Evil – thank you Alabama

  483. Hugh says:

    Not a good scenario for us. Trump will not stop being trump. Even with 3% plus growth we will lose badly in an off year election. We need a sup court justice to retire soon and a get a solid conservative on prior to the off year election. I figured Moore a lunatic conservative creep would still
    Win by an ok margin since the alternative is a guy who will not do anything Alabama likes. To me politics has become a winner take all game. So I would have voted for that vile man because the real consequences of a dem senate is horrible. Apparently one of the most gop states in America voted for a guy the will never vote their way. A blue state would never be so stupid.

  484. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:42 pm

    Of course, you thought the WAPO orchestrated hit job on Moore was credible too…

    – Absolutely, I though the WaPo piece was credible o Moore. And you know what. It seems plenty in Alabama did as well.

  485. Tina says:

    Shannon Bream
    ?
    @ShannonBream
    Strzok/Page texts obtained by @JakeBGibson – “PS: God Hillary should win. 100,000,000-0. LP: I know”

    Wtf

  486. Cash Cow TM says:

    Told you much earlier today that Moore was only getting 1/2 of the Guernsey vote.

    To win, Moore had to get 3/4 of them.

  487. Tina says:

    We need to get legislation passed. Theyndid aome good work with the sc judge and the lesser courts, but we are light with legislation.

  488. janz says:

    Perhaps Moore would have been an embarrassment for the GOP, should he have been able to pull this one out. However, a greater good, in him surviving the piling-on of establishment R’s and leftist dems, is that it would have showed a growing immunity of the public to being roped into emotional voting before due process was properly exercised.

  489. CG says:

    MSNBC is still being circumspect in saying Jones won.

    Quick Trump, turn your channel to MSNBC!

  490. Tina says:

    udge Tanya Chutkan is also presiding over the Imran Awan and Hina Alvi bank fraud case recuses herself from fusion matter.

  491. Tgca says:

    Well, what needs to happen is to send Sessions back to AL to win the senate seat in 2020. Good senator, weak AG.

  492. Redmen4ever says:

    I will now speak in defense of Roy Moore.

    Even back when he was a cadet at West Point he was “out there.” (I have sources.) Still, he did his duty, went to Viet Nam, and came home when soldiers with whom he served, including classmates did not.

    He then served as an Assistant District Attorney and a Circuit Court Judge. He was something of a perennial candidate, but actually got elected twice Chief Justice of the State Supreme Court. He was twice removed from that court for matters of religious conscious. While I sympathize with his acting on faith, I agree 100 percent with each removal.

    I have a lot of sympathy for the oddballs among us, but none for pedophiles or rapists. At this point, there will be no Senate Ethics Committee hearing on his fitness for office, so all we can say to him or to his accusers in that, in this country, a man is innocent until proven guilty. Being defeated in an election happens to half the candidates (more if you consider the third-party and independent candidates). Democracy doesn’t work without people willing to it on the line to run for office.

    I wish Roy Moore and his family the best.

  493. MichiganGuy says:

    Well, you guys that are happy Jones won. We will see when liberal dem women start using this smear tactic against other Republican candidates. ALso, I was right about the foxnews poll being fake. Jones barely won.

  494. Tina says:

    Judge orders bradty turnover in flynn matter.

    Judge Emmet Sullivan has cited Weissman before for withholding exculpatory evidence. Judge Sullivan threw out the case. The bar investigated but a Doj protected him.

  495. CG says:

    What was said in defense of Roy Moore keeping a Republican Senate seat that could not or would not also have been said about David Duke if he were the one in the same position?

    “What good will it be for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul? Or what can anyone give in exchange for their soul?”

  496. Wes says:

    How exactly is Roy Moore planning to remove Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader now?

  497. Tina says:

    Yeah send sessions back. Turns out the gnome r3cused himself in muh russia, when the fbi told him he did not need to do so.

    Stupid idiot ketting rosenstein hijack the doj and keep mccabe running the fbi as defacto head.

  498. Phil says:

    ‘Expect Democrats to double down on sexual harrassment charges on Trump now that it worked on Moore.”

    Yep. Count on it.

  499. Redmen4ever says:

    The vote is tightening up in Jefferson and Mobile counties. The race will end very close, and there still is a possible Roy Moore pulls it out.

  500. CG says:

    That sick bastard Al Franken better resign now.

  501. Bitterlaw says:

    Trump should continue to tweet about political issues. He should stop fighting with nobodies.

    Both can be true.

  502. Tina says:

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2017/12/stray-strzok-thoughts.php

    Interesting article on pete the cheat. If must have found a compelling reason to size his emails.

  503. Wes says:

    ELMER GANTRY ARRIVES TO WOW US WITH HIS INANE ANALYSIS!

    You backed this moron, Elmer.

    How does it feel to know your dream of American theocracy died tonight?

  504. Bitterlaw says:

    Tgca – 150 years ago, my ancestors probably worked in the coal mines at the age of 10. People were lucky to make it to 45. Dating teens in your 30s now is creepy.

  505. NYCmike says:

    #505 – wrong, simply wrong.

  506. Phil says:

    511

    Yep

  507. janz says:

    What a slim margin, between candidates — less than 10,000 votes with 96% reporting in! One can say that Moore “almost” won, despite being cannibalized by the media and all sides of the political spectrum.

  508. Tgca says:

    So the GOP lost one tonight that all knows will be won back in 2020 if a decent candidate is run so not the end of the world in the long run.

    Can’t win them all and the GOP will win some more and lose some more in the future. It’s how the game works.

    …and it will make the Senate have to work harder now. Let’s see which 2 GOP senators are willing to kill the tax bill now. If McConnell can’t hold it together, I suspect he will be forced to go, as he should, if he can’t deliver on what the vast majority of the GOP wants.

  509. janz says:

    …plus, Jones outspent Moore something like seven to one. Once again, the dems buy an election — or so it seems.

  510. Wes says:

    Almost winning=losing, Janz.

    Moore doesn’t get to be Senator for a day just because Jones barely edged him.

  511. Proud Obamacon says:

    “I’ve been waiting all my life and now I don’t know what the hell to say”

    Senator-elect Doug Jones leads off his victory speech echoing what millions are thinking.

    What a beautiful family. And to win on his 25th wedding anniversary.

    What a great day for America! Good defeats Evil!

  512. Redmen4ever says:

    David Duke v. Roy Moore

    Duke was an admitted member of the Klan. Moore denied the accusations of child molestation and sexual assault.

  513. Robbie says:

    Wes says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:52 pm
    How exactly is Roy Moore planning to remove Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader now?

    – Secret ninjas.

  514. Bitterlaw says:

    506 Wes – He will lead a coup with Senators Angle, COD, Buck, and Mourdoch.

  515. Wes says:

    Janz, Democrats shouldn’t have been able to outspend Republicans in Alabama.

    That’s like saying Republicans outspend Democrats in California.

    It’s simply inconceivable, yet Roy Moore made it so.

  516. CG says:

    No, Duke “left the Klan” decades ago. The same people who excused Moore would have excused Duke, not because they like him but because “the seat, and the agenda, and the liberals and the judges and Robert Byrd was also once in the Klan” and whatever…

    Happy Hanukkah to Roy Moore’s Jewish lawyer. Make sure they pay their bill.

  517. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:53 pm
    ‘Expect Democrats to double down on sexual harrassment charges on Trump now that it worked on Moore.”
    Yep. Count on it.

    – And if there is a new batch with credible stories of genuine sexual misconduct/harassment, then Trump could be in a real spot of danger. This environment is far different from the one he survived last October 2016.

  518. jason says:

    I wish Roy Moore and his family the best.”

    Your analysis of him is much more charitable than mine.

    Frankly, if he couldn’t do his job and follow the law or the Constitution because of his religious beliefs, then why did he want to be a judge?

    Still, no sense beating up on him now, I wish him well too.

    And I hope he sues the crap out anyone who accused him unfairly.

  519. janz says:

    The write-ins were over 22,000. That alone shifted the race over to the dems.

  520. NYCmike says:

    “CG”,

    Absolute B*llsh*t, but that is to be expected from you.

    Considering you still can’t produce any liberal policies pushed by a Trump admin, and compare those to what a Hillary admin would have done, shows the total lack of regard for the good that Trump did in winning the election last November.

  521. Proud Obamacon says:

    janz seems triggered LOL

  522. Wes says:

    Come back, Elmer!

    You haven’t explained to us yet how the candidate you declared to be invincible in Alabama lost.

  523. Wes says:

    Mikey, I thought Moore HAD to be seated for his accusers to receive justice.

  524. Robbie says:

    The tweets tomorrow are going to be lit AF.

    Jim Acosta?
    @Acosta

    Source close to WH: “It’s devastating for the president… this is an earthquake… Virginia but on steroids… the president has egg on his face” because of Bannon.

  525. jason says:

    ess than 10,000 votes with 96% reporting in!”

    Yeah but Strange would have won by 200k votes.

  526. NYCmike says:

    “janz seems triggered LOL”

    -She stated a fact about the write-ins.

    That’s “triggered”?

  527. Phil says:

    Jones will be gone in two years.

    Still, makes the Next Supreme Court nominee a lot tougher.

  528. janz says:

    #525 Moore ran alone in this race. He ran on his reputation (be that as it may) and the public service he had chalked up in the state. There was no wind nor money at his back. The GOP turned their backs on him for much of the race. So, considering all this he did fairly well, as a dyed in the wool underdog.

  529. Tina says:

    eriously?! Would you not [vote] D[emocrat]?” Page responded.

    “I don’t know,” Strzok answered. “I suppose Hillary [Clinton].”

    “I would [vote] D,” Page affirmed.

    Two days later, Page texted Strzok: “God, Trump is a loathsome human.”

    “Yet he many[sic] win,” Strzok responded. “Good for Hillary.”

    Later the same day, Strzok texted Page, “Omg [Trump’s] an idiot.”

    “He’s awful,” Page answered.

    “America will get what the voting public deserves,” said Strzok, to which Page responded. “That’s what I’m afraid of.”

    Later that same day, Strzok texted Page, “Ok I may vote for Trump.”

    “What?” answered Page. “Poor Kasich. He’s the only sensible man up there.”

    “He was pretty much calling for death for [NSA leaker] Edward Snowden,” Strzok said. “I’m a single-issue voter. ? Espionage Machine Party.”

    Strzok later told Page, “Exacty re Kasich. And he has ZERO appeal.”

    Pete the cheat and his mistress, oage. This sounds like hhr 2016.

  530. NYCmike says:

    “Mikey, I thought Moore HAD to be seated for his accusers to receive justice.”

    -Let’s see if the women still want justice after tonight….

  531. CG says:

    If you would not have rooted by David Duke or “wished for him to win by one vote” or something like that, what’s the difference between him and Moore?

    Where is the line? Where is the point of no return?

    Apparently, it was not with Roy Moore saying that the United States deserved the 9/11 attacks or that only Christians should be allowed to hold elective office.

  532. Proud Obamacon says:

    Great spin, janz… working overtime in the spin department. Good work janz!

  533. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 12, 2017 at 11:05 pm
    Jones will be gone in two years.
    Still, makes the Next Supreme Court nominee a lot tougher.

    – On that one, I doubt it. SCOTUS is a different beats than legislation.

    The question is whether Kennedy will retire in these odd times and allow Trump to replace him. Right now, I doubt it.

  534. Phil says:

    527

    Sure, Robbie. The Russian thing didn’t work out.

    It will be the MSM’s new “collusion”

    You know it and I know it.

  535. janz says:

    As I wrote the other day, I am not a fan of all these sexual allegations sprouting up like weeds in a field. It’s over-kill, IMO. And, it’s far from courageous for a person to join the herd in “coming out” with their “me too” allegations.

  536. CG says:

    Mitch McConnell is the Real MVP

    Single-handily paved the way for Gorsuch to be on the Court and for a liberal to not. And he prevented Moore from winning this seat and harming every single Republican on the ballot in 2018 and beyond by association.

  537. Tina says:

    Phil, we need to get the tax bikll done, grassleynhas done well with the judicial nominees, we need to also pack the lower courts since it also matters.

    It is up to mitchie and ryano to leave their barhtubs and get something passed.

  538. Robbie says:

    I can’t wait for Steve Bannon to pimp for Chris McDaniel’s race against Roger Wicker.

  539. lisab says:

    What was said in defense of Roy Moore keeping a Republican Senate seat that could not or would not also have been said about David Duke if he were the one in the same position?
    ————————————-

    david duke was an outspoken white nationalist

    moore denies the allegations and has never been proven to be guilty

    big difference

  540. Tina says:

    Muh russian is replaced by muh accuser.

  541. Tina says:

    I wonder if the mn slob will leave the senate.

  542. Proud Obamacon says:

    “As I wrote the other day, I am not a fan of all these sexual allegations sprouting up like weeds in a field. It’s over-kill, IMO. And, it’s far from courageous for a person to join the herd in “coming out” with their “me too” allegations.”

    So Janz wants Franken to return to the senate? So confusing LOL

  543. Tina says:

    ris
    @Peoples_Pundit
    The “repudiation of Trump” narrative is stupid. He is very popular in Alabama. They didn’t vote for Roy Moore, and haven’t been voting for numerous elections now. I held back, but now it’s a trend. I don’t see how you could argue otherwise.
    7:54 PM · Dec 12, 2017

  544. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 12, 2017 at 11:08 pm
    527
    Sure, Robbie. The Russian thing didn’t work out.
    It will be the MSM’s new “collusion”
    You know it and I know it.

    – I disagree. The Russia story is hardly over as I expect more indictments and a possible obstruction referral to the Congress. The harassment story is Trump’s soft underbelly. He’s in a jam of his own making and losing Alabama just puts him in even more political peril. In a parliamentary system, Trump would be forced out by tomorrow and Pence would be president.

  545. Wes says:

    Janz, I like you, but I’d believe a guy who told me he was giving me the winning lottery ticket just for the hell of it before I’d put any stock in what you wrote in 539.

    Roy Moore is a sanctimonious, elitist, lawbreaking theocrat widely despised because of those attributes in Alabama. That alone dampened his statewide viability.

    Then when the sex allegations came to light and Moore went full Clinton in his response, that dinged him further.

    Republicans abandoned Moore because he gave them reason to.

    Had he not been an elitist, sanctimonious, lawbreaking theocrat burdened with allegations of sexual misconduct, he would have won…

    …but then he wouldn’t be Roy Moore.

  546. Tina says:

    I think the rs need to stand together and use their power more effectively. They have a narrow window and people are watching and are disgusted with the lack of legislative victories.

  547. janz says:

    #541 NYC, good point! The women will disappear as fast as they appeared. Their job was to diminish the R candidate. And, they succeeded. Now, the women, asserting improprieties against the POTUS, will feel empowered and attempt a similar game plan.

  548. Phil says:

    Maybe GOP primary voters in Arizona and Nevada will now come to their senses.

  549. lisab says:

    And if there is a new batch with credible stories of genuine sexual misconduct/harassment, then Trump could be in a real spot of danger.
    —————————

    that is the new game plan

  550. CG says:

    Trump is so popular in Alabama he turned out an electorate where he was at 48/48.

    Had he not gotten so involved on behalf of Moore the last few days, his candidate probably would have won.

    Trump got the Democrats to turn out in Virginia and he got that to happen in Alabama too. Republicans really better wise up about what he might mean for them in 2018.

  551. Tgca says:

    Trump will survive this because his supporters know he did this for the senate votes and not because he was a true Moore supporter. I dont see this having a lasting impact on Trump personally. ..and though it makes Senate votes tougher through 2018, it does take away the Dems using Moore as a poster child for bad behavior against the GOP.

    I still think Dems have issues due to multiple sexual harassment issues of high profile Dems so unless that happens to GOP too, I see this as still a challenge for Dems.

  552. Robbie says:

    Mighty fine party Trump is leading.

    Al Weaver?
    @alweaver22

    Source close to the RNC tells me folks there are furious with Ronna McDaniel over their move to jump back in the race for Moore.

    “Congratulations on dropping the Romney name and picking up a pedophile. Proud day for the RNC.”

  553. Proud Obamacon says:

    Janz unhinged – Go Girl!

  554. lisab says:

    I think the rs need to stand together and use their power more effectively.
    ——————————

    mccain will not support trump

  555. Robbie says:

    Well at least they won’t be able to say the GOP stands for Grand Old Pedophiles.

  556. Bitterlaw says:

    MG – GFY. I am not happy that Jones won. I am passed that Moore managed to something almost impossible – lose as a Republican in Alabama.

    I am happy that you exposed yourself as a theocrat who is opposed to the Constitution. I look forward to a day when some Muslim-American judge substitutes Allah’s law for civil law and you have to STFU or admit being a hypocrite.

  557. CG says:

    A freakin’ Bath Towel with an R next to its name should have been able to win a Senate race in Alabama against a completely pro-choice liberal Democrat.

    But Roy Moore blew it because enough people have common sense and realized what he is.

  558. Redmen4ever says:

    Was David Duke an admitted member of the KKK?

    When you say he left the KKK, you actually are admitting he was a member.

    As to his leaving: While he left the Klan, he remained a white supremacist. If he repented of his racist views, that might have been a different thing.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Duke#Knights_of_the_Ku_Klux_Klan

    Another thing about Duke: he never won a Republican Primary. He finished in the top two of the Louisiana non-partisan primary (sometimes called a jungle primary). But, even if he did win a Republican primary, the party (meaning the state central committee) could disavow him, as parties do for various reasons every now and then.

  559. Tina says:

    Muh russian is done, it is clear that the ig, doj, and possibly mueller are targetinpg drats.

    Even schiff for brains suggested that,

    It is clear that the drats weaponized the fbi in 2016.

    That new judge, demanding brady, so early in the flynn matter, may end up,tossing altogether, especially if yates, et al illegalky wiretapped flynn. Ethat judge has thrown sheot out agains t the fbi inder weissmans practices.

  560. Tina says:

    I thought duke is a drat, so he fits the jebot oarty well

  561. Phil says:

    Over a year on the Russian investigation and no evidence against Trump. None.

    Is the story over? Nope. Your friends in the MSM will see to that……..but substance? There is none. It’s been a year.

  562. Wes says:

    Roy Moore bragged Mitch McConnell had two strikes in his supposed effort to keep Moore out of the Senate. I wonder what Theocrat Roy has to say about that now.

  563. Tina says:

    Mulehead cannot continue his investigation with the drip, drip drip of corruption, orr, pete the cheat, sjw, weissman, et. Al

  564. CG says:

    Again, I ask, “where is the line?”

    What exactly would a Republican nominee have had to have done or have had to say to not want them to defeat a liberal Democrat and lose a Senate seat?

    If someone can swallow Trump, they can swallow Moore, and I just don’t see that much of a larger jump to swallow Duke. Where is the line? Again, Roy Moore is someone who said the U.S. deserved the 9/11 attacks.

    Drain the Swamp of them all.

  565. Tgca says:

    I think Franken should stay in the Senate. Then we can focus s on hearings of him and Menendez for the next year. That would be nice.

  566. Robbie says:

    Tina says:
    December 12, 2017 at 11:14 pm
    Muh russian is done, it is clear that the ig, doj, and possibly mueller are targetinpg drats.

    – You also said no special prosecutor, no indictments, and no plea deals.

    0-3

  567. janz says:

    “Roy Moore is a sanctimonious, elitist, lawbreaking theocrat….”

    Wes, I agree with you as far as you went in that sentence. However, as he did win the primary, I don’t think the people of AL despised him as much as you think. He is a “good ol’ boy,” representing an “in your face” era. Some people gravitate to that kind of “Jack Bauer” persona.

    I think had these complaints been revealed before the primary Moore would have lost. Just that alone, seems like such a deliberate manipulation of the election process by the dems — holding back some sludge until it could have the greatest impact for them to win an election — truth be dammed!

  568. Tina says:

    Not impressed with new fbi dir3ctor, wray, he is comedy light. I think rinse prubus redommend d himand he is awful.

    They d9 not need another lawyah running the fbi i to the crapper.

  569. Proud Obamacon says:

    Janz now defending Al Franken. Wow, Janz is a democrat now? What a day!

  570. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 12, 2017 at 11:16 pm
    Over a year on the Russian investigation and no evidence against Trump. None.
    Is the story over? Nope. Your friends in the MSM will see to that……..but substance? There is none. It’s been a year.

    – How do you know what’s been determined? No one knew about Papdopolous. How much else do we not know? My guess is we know about 10% of what Mueller knows.

  571. Wes says:

    Janz, Moore won the primary because Luther Strange stupidly accepted a Senate appointment from the Governor he was investigating. Had Strange refused the appointment and instead run in the primary wiyhout being tainted with the stench of Bentley, Roy Moore couldn’t have thrown the seat away tonight.

  572. lisab says:

    If someone can swallow Trump, they can swallow Moore, and I just don’t see that much of a larger jump to swallow Duke. Where is the line?
    ———————————————-

    well here is a hint … moore was simply accused of sexual predation 40 years ago, there is no strong evidence of it

    while the kkk is aligned with skinheads and known to commit murder

  573. Proud Obamacon says:

    “I think had these complaints been revealed before the primary Moore would have lost. Just that alone, seems like such a deliberate manipulation of the election process by the dems — holding back some sludge until it could have the greatest impact for them to win an election — truth be dammed!”

    WOW TRIGGERED!!!! GO JANZ!

  574. Tina says:

    Nope drat troll, said there was no charges of collusion.

    Hounsaid collusion and now you say obstruction.

    Younare livid comedynwas fired.

  575. Tgca says:

    I don’t see how Mueller can contain this damage if the content of the emails by his team turn out to be as stated, and Congress is all over him now for misleading them and withholding info. I think if he was smart, he wrap this up and call it a day and hang his hat on the minor violations he got on Flynn and Manafort to date. His reputation has already taken a big hit and now this? It looks bad and GOP will be hammering this the next year non-stop. Better to go for partial win then end up having a special prosecutor investigate a special prosecutor.

  576. Wes says:

    Is Elmer planning to weigh in on his idol’s defeat further?

  577. CG says:

    Roy Moore is Jack Bauer now?

    Jack Bauer, the fictional character would have hunted down Osama bin Laden and all his co-horts himself.

    Roy Moore would have told them that were right to kill thousands of Americans.

    Jack Bauer went to the ends of the earth to protect his teenage daughter (in Season 1), Roy Moore would have creeped on her.

  578. Phil says:

    Give it up on Russia, Robbie. In your more lucid moments you’ve even admitted there is no collusion between Russia and Donald Trump.

    Get with the new talking points. It’s sexual harassment now. Worked like a charm in Alabama. Think the Democratic – Republican never Trump coalition isn’t going to go all in the new winning strategy? Stay on script.

  579. Tina says:

    You basically got pappas and flynn on lying. Flynn charge apoears weak and he served longer under obumbler. Pappas was turned in by trump.

    And you got manaafort on a tax issue,

    Bfd.

  580. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump

    “Congratulations to Doug Jones on a hard fought victory. The write-in votes played a very big factor, but a win is a win. The people of Alabama are great, and the Republicans will have another shot at this seat in a very short period of time. It never ends!”

    Sort of a gracious tweet. Am not sure Trump is that unhappy that Moore lost.

  581. Proud Obamacon says:

    Romeo Moore currently writing his concession speech…. LOL conceited jerk. Got exactly what he deserved.

  582. Tina says:

    Where is the phuqin collusion between trump and the russians?

    Links please.

    Mueller wasted 7 million on a aheot sandwich.

  583. janz says:

    #582 Wes, I know that sidebar behind Strange’s loss. However, had the allegations against Moore been brought up before the primary IMO Strange would have been able to leg out a win against Moore. Of course this is speculation on my part, as it’s a rear view mirror perspective.

  584. Tina says:

    Muh russian is now muh harasssment.

    Bill o reilly warned that the jebots aka drats have some5ing planned against trump in january.

    The drats have given up on muh russian, notice all these stories about orr, weissman, pete the cheat, etc. all suggesting that mueller is incompetent.

  585. Proud Obamacon says:

    ” The write-in votes played a very big factor”

    LOL.. yeah YOU also played a big factor, Mr Presdient. Romeo Moore also played a big factor.

    More excuses, tweeting only to his base. Typical Loooosah. Not gracious at all.

  586. CG says:

    Donald, it ends for us all eventually.

    Tonight, it ended for Roy Moore.

    Tomorrow, and no later, it should end for Al Franken, Ruben Kihuen, Blake Farenthold, and anyone else who deserves to have it end politically.

  587. Bitterlaw says:

    I set the over/under on JC’s return at 3 days. I take the over.

  588. lisab says:

    the russian collusion story is dead, cnn won’t even discuss it any more

    the new thing will be sexual allegations. trump has probably had sex with 50+ women. someone will come forward with some nasty story. it is only a matter of time now.

  589. Paul says:

    Roy Moore is still fighting. He won’t concede.

  590. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    578. “I think had these complaints been revealed before the primary Moore would have lost. Just that alone, seems like such a deliberate manipulation of the election process by the dems — holding back some sludge until it could have the greatest impact for them to win an election — truth be dammed!”

    Welcome to the wonderful world of politics! And it worked — the Democrats picked up a seat they normally would not have won.

    This is why a party should be doing “opposition research” on its own prospective candidates. You want to know their weaknesses prior to nominating them.

  591. Proud Obamacon says:

    Jones now at 49.9%

  592. Phil says:

    I give it until the day after tomorrow, Lisa.

  593. Proud Obamacon says:

    God is going to help Roy Moore. Ok, sport!

    LOL

  594. CG says:

    Imagine if Hillary had refused to concede because G-d had not given her permission to do so yet..

  595. Paul says:

    600: I feel terribly sorry for those 50 poor souls.

  596. Proud Obamacon says:

    Actually punk, God is NOT on your side. Bye Romeo Moore.

  597. janz says:

    #591 That was a responsible tween by DT. I wish he could conger up more of that caliber when commenting on the events or comments made by people. It would benefit his presidency if this happened.

  598. Tina says:

    Her thighness has not conceded. She blames the russians.

    How convenient that the jebots forgot this.

  599. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    597. “Tonight, it ended for Roy Moore. Tomorrow, and no later, it should end for Al Franken, Ruben Kihuen, Blake Farenthold, and anyone else who deserves to have it end politically.”

    Agree. The Democrats suffered a huge amount of collateral damage from their Moore caper, including Franken and many others. If Franken had any thought of not resigning, it is over now.

  600. Tina says:

    One of the accusers did come forward. She is upset that trump asked for her phone number in the 1980s.

    Yup, muh harrasememt

  601. CG says:

    The Tweets he will send several hours from now in the early morning hours will be more entertaining.

  602. Tina says:

    We need to i coude the two nj senators.

  603. lisab says:

    I give it until the day after tomorrow, Lisa.
    —————————

    oreilly claims they have someone waiting until after the holidays

    no way to know if it is true.

    trump better hope that he has the cancelled checks.

    “here is where i bought carol a fur coat. here is the check for annie’s porshe, here is the receipt for julie’s necklace etc.”

  604. Tina says:

    He shoukd not have made any campaign calls for moore. Janz is right that is a mistake.

  605. Paul says:

    614: That will come once Christie is out of office.

  606. Tina says:

    Well, they were heard in the 2016 campaign.

    The one is upset that he never went to her restaurant,

    The ither is uoset because he asked for her oh8ne number.

    But, i know muh harassement because alllred says so and muh russia failed.

  607. Phil says:

    After the holidays?

    They are going to wait that long?

    I Doubt it.

  608. janz says:

    Step # 2 in getting rid of DT —> Donald Trump #MeToo Moment is Here.

  609. Paul says:

    615: I thought his game was furniture shopping 🙂

  610. lisab says:

    One of the accusers did come forward. She is upset that trump asked for her phone number in the 1980s.
    ——————–

    he is a well known billionaire, i am pretty sure lots of women were lined up to sleep with him

    and some will be very anti-trump now that he beat hillary

  611. Tina says:

    Phil. I read the report from oreilly earlier. That is where theynare going since muh russian turned up,no,colllusion.

  612. Tina says:

    Oreilllynsuggests its a new accuser enticed by 200k payment bynthe drat fringes.

  613. Phil says:

    Phone number in the 1980’s?

    OMG! He has to go!
    Seriously, wasn’t it the Democrats just six months ago laughing at and mocking Mike Pence for never having dinner with another woman not his wife?

  614. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    A quote from Breitbart: “Republican Saboteurs Flip Seat to Democrats”

  615. jason says:

    Poor ObamaCON sees Doug Jones as one step closer to his Marxist dream.

    Of course, if he was a real man he would move to Cuba, but they might make him work.

    So he stays here, pining for the old Soviet Union.

  616. lisab says:

    maybe trump did not sleep with a bunch of women, but he was a billionaire and single for something like 15 years, in nyc, which is loaded with single women, including many models …

    so i have to believe that 3 women per year for a single billionaire is not out of the question

    and at least one will be nuts

  617. jason says:

    Republican Saboteurs Flip Seat to Democrats”

    Like I said, I don’t hold out any hope the deadenders will learn from this.

  618. Tina says:

    Moore should concede. Quit with the hillary drama.

  619. Proud Obamacon says:

    Ok jason with his usual shtick about Cuba and Soviet Union… *yawn

  620. Phil says:

    at least one will be nuts

    ……more like paid off.

  621. Tina says:

    That is one of the accusers from janz cnn article. She is upset that he asked her for her number. She gave it and he called her.

    So muh. Harassment.

  622. Tina says:

    She coukd have said no, no tomgiving him her phone number.

  623. Phil says:

    They’ll come up with something far more explosive than that, Tina.

    Everyone knows where this is headed.

  624. jason says:

    Good for Drudge…

    Luther Strange would have won in a landslide… Just too much crazy in nerve racking times,” influential news kingpin Matt Drudge wrote on Twitter following Moore’s loss. “There IS a limit!”

  625. lisab says:

    Oreilllynsuggests its a new accuser enticed by 200k payment bynthe drat fringes.
    —————————–

    think what she could make up …

    “he wanted to wear my panties”
    “he liked to be spanked”
    “he liked to tie me up”
    “he liked to be tied up”
    “he wanted to go to a swingers club”
    “he fantisized about being robbie’s boi toi”

    there are just so many ways a former lover could screw him over

  626. Phil says:

    Luther Strange would have won by 250K votes. Not even the trolls on this site would dispute that.

  627. jason says:

    Of course Proud ObamaCON should go to North Korea if he really wants Marxist purity.

  628. lisab says:

    oh … given the moore allegations

    “he liked me to dress up as a catholic schoolgirl”

  629. jason says:

    Clinton was sticking cigars into intern’s you know what in the Oval Office and smoking them, the Dems had no problem with that.

    But they are just terribly shocked about Trump’s locker room talk. Shocked I tell you.

  630. Proud Obamacon says:

    Jason appears to be triggered as well LOL

  631. lisab says:

    or …

    “he liked to dress up as a catholic schoolgirl” 🙂

  632. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    635. “Just too much crazy in nerve racking times,” influential news kingpin Matt Drudge wrote on Twitter following Moore’s loss. “There IS a limit!””

    Brilliantly said.

  633. Tina says:

    Yu, strange got phuqed. He would have won, but the vote should have occured next year. They had time,

    Anyway night gang.

  634. Redmen4ever says:

    With 100 percent of the vote counted: Jones 49.9 to 48.4 to 1.7.

    D +1.5

    Again the average of the polls was off. As in Virginia where the Democrats outperformed their projected margin of victory, here they won by a narrow margin when the Republican was projected to win.

    As in Virginia, the polls did not capture turnout. This admittedly is a difficult thing in off-year elections and there were additional factors complication this particular election. But, it should now be clear that Democrats have a combination of enthusiasm and organizational GOTV that gives them a real advantage.

  635. Proud Obamacon says:

    Romeo Moore is not a fan of any of the amendments after the 10th.

    Especially that darned 15th amendment that sent him packing tonight! Poor Romeo LOL

  636. CG says:

    It’s more like R.Kelly Moore

  637. Proud Obamacon says:

    Jason hopes any sane person who dissents should move to North Korea. Sad times for Jason, so triggered. The blue sleeping giant is officially awake yall !

  638. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    Bannon getting the blame; a key issue is will his donors cut him off:

    “Instead, some of McConnell’s chief advisers used the results to skewer Bannon, who has openly advocated for primary challenges to incumbent Republicans who he says are blocking Trump’s agenda.

    “Before we get the results, I’d just like to thank Steve Bannon for showing us how to lose the reddest state in the union and Governor [Kay] Ivey for the opportunity to make this national embarrassment a reality,” Josh Holmes, a former McConnell chief of staff, said in a tweet.

    The Senate Leadership Fund used the loss to try to drive a wedge between Bannon and his patron, Trump.

    “This is a brutal reminder that candidate quality matters regardless of where you are running,” Senate Leadership Fund CEO Steven Law, the former McConnell chief of staff, said in a statement. “Not only did Steve Bannon cost us a critical Senate seat in one of the most Republican states in the country, but he also dragged the President of the United States into his fiasco.”

    Privately, McConnell allies said they would use the results of Tuesday’s special election to try to curb Bannon’s influence over Republican primary voters. The advisers said donors who were once inclined to aid Bannon’s chosen candidates would now refuse to write the checks needed to fund primary challenges to candidates favored by national Republicans.”

  639. TrumpIsPeteWilson says:

    SENATE IS GONE.

    NEVADA?

    GONE.

    ARIZONA?

    GONE.

    TENNESSEE?

    GONE.

    Let’s add the Lyin’ Ted to the casualty list too for good measure.

    And let’s not forget, you get a centrist Dem in Mitt Romney to replace a decaying corpse in Utah.

    53 seat majority in 2018. To think, Republicans will only win 4 or 5 seats out of 33 in 2018.

    If Hillary had been president, they would’ve easily won around 6.

    Thanks Trumpkins. While your moron-in-chief is laughably moronic, the next Dem president will have a super-majority in 2021.

  640. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    “And let’s not forget, you get a centrist Dem in Mitt Romney ..”

    Wow TisPW, did not know you were such an admirer of Romney. If it is Hillary vs. Romney in 2020, who will you support?

  641. MichiganGuy says:

    Bitterlaw says:
    December 12, 2017 at 10:14 pm
    Wes – MG is still trying to figure out why God let him down tonight.
    ——————————————————————————————————
    I see BL is a happy camper tonight. As usual you know nothing about me or God. I’ve been here for 4 years. I’m not that complicated. Yet he still no nothing about me. lol
    God never lets me down. Only people like you.

  642. Wes says:

    How to lose an unlosable race in an overwhelmingly GOP state:

    1) Make a popular longtime Senator Attorney General.

    2) Have an unpopular Governor appoint the state AG to the Senate to end an investigation.

    3) Have a clown car primary followed by a runoff won by a theocratic lunatic.

    4) Have the new Governor move the election up a year.

    5) Have your candidate become the target of multiple creepy sex allegations.

    6) Have the new Governor refuse to cancel the special election in favor of a new one.

    7) See your candidate outspent heavily.

    8) Lose.

    That’s the Steve Bannon class on how to lose an unlosable election in a solidly GOP state. We saw a live-action interactive demonstration yesterday.

  643. Wes says:

    Your dream of American theocracy died last night, Elmer.

    How does that feel?

  644. Trump says:

    The destruction of the gop continues apace.

    Which seat is next? Beyond Nevada and Arizona (two seats), of course?

  645. MichiganGuy says:

    Bitterlaw says:
    December 12, 2017 at 11:13 pm

    I am happy that you exposed yourself as a theocrat who is opposed to the Constitution. I look forward to a day when some Muslim-American judge substitutes Allah’s law for civil law and you have to STFU or admit being a hypocrite.
    —————————————————————————————————–
    BL, such hatred and vile spewing out of your mouth. Settle down you’re going to give yourself a heart attack. Well I’m glad you’re looking forward to muslims taking over our country but, I fail to see how that would make me a hypocrite? I’m a Christian. I support Christianity. I don’t support Islam or Sharia. What part of that confuses you?

  646. Tina says:

    The ds got their people out. 92 percent turnout from 2016, Rs onky 50 percent.

  647. Wes says:

    For the record, Jeff Sessions won this seat unopposed in 2014. Steve Bannon and Elmer Gantry supported the one person capable of losing it. He promptly lost.

    That says a lot.

  648. Wes says:

    Republican Saboteurs Flip Seat to Democrats

    Breitbart was right but should have named the names: Roy Moore, Steve Bannon, and Kay Ivey.

  649. Tina says:

    Lyingg trd, cruz from tx? Are you saying he is in trouble, Tispw? Did you have too much to drink?

  650. MichiganGuy says:

    Wes is a sad little man. I’m a Republican. I supported the Republican nominee. Surprise. Surprise. If Strange would of won the primary I would have supported him but he didn’t. Guess what I don’t live in Alabama so, I didn’t get to vote for anyone. All I did was support the Republican nominee in here but, if you and BL want to hate on me for that than go ahead. I’m used to it. 🙂

  651. Tina says:

    Yeah, steve law is correct. He managed to drag the president in. He stayed away until the last week or so,

    This wil cost him capitol and now tax cuts coukd be endangered. This is not good news.

    We need legislative wins at this point.

  652. Tina says:

    Is bl now stating that shariah law replaces our law?

    This is all bizarre

  653. MichiganGuy says:

    Tina, BL said he looks forward to a muslim American using Sharia Law on us. Go figured.

  654. MichiganGuy says:

    muslim American Judge*

  655. Trump says:

    WE already have a wise Latina imposing intersectionality wokeness.

    Why not muslim sharia?

  656. Sheeple, Jr. says:

    #658
    You get the prize. That was the primary reason for Moore’s loss. Only he and Strange could have lost the Alabama Senate seat.
    Shelby’s TV appearance on Sunday helped depress GOP turnout.

    POLLING: Below Average. Monmouth came the closest. Emerson and FOX were disgraceful.

    EXIT POLLING: Spot-on. I knew the GOP turnout would be depressed when this polling showed Trump’s approval in AL at 47%.

  657. Tina says:

    This is ma 2010 redux with us holof8ng the bag this time.

  658. Bitterlaw says:

    MG – I do not look forward to Sharia. I am pointing out the danger posed by people like you. What is the difference between you wanting your God’s law imposed on America and somebody else wanting their God’s law imposed on America? You both want the same thing.

    I am not happy that Jones won. If I lived in Alabama, I would have voted for Moore (I voted for dirtbag Trump. Why not vote for scumbag Moore?). I tried to warn you and everybody else that the Democrats are out for blood and will turn out. You talked about how Moore would win because he was a man of God. Well, God must be a Democrat.

  659. Bitterlaw says:

    Tina – This is worse than Brown. MA occasionally elects Republicans to something. This was Alabama. Brown brought the a Dems down to 59 seats. Jones brings the GOP down to 51.

  660. Sheeple, Jr. says:

    Bitter and Tina
    WOW!!!Catch these e-mails from the FBI investigators. The Mueller investigation has been corrupted.

    https://twitchy.com/dougp-3137/2017/12/12/wow-these-texts-were-actually-sent-by-fbi-agents-working-on-the-mueller-probe/?utm_campaign=twitchywidget

    What say you?

  661. Bitterlaw says:

    Lessons learned;

    1. God does not care who wins an election.

    2. Democrats play to win.

    3. When you nominate a creepy theocrat who has no respect for the law or Constitution, bad things happen.

    4. The polls did not fail to count Moore voters afraid to support him in a survey. There were not enough Moore supporters.

    5. Not enough people think it is ok to date teens when you are in your 30s

    6. A wave of rural Trump supporters is not going to rescue deeply flawed candidates.

    7. Bannon should have retired after 2016.

    8. I hate Democrats but when I tell you a Democrat is going to win, you should listen.

    9. MG does not believe in the rule of law.

  662. MichiganGuy says:

    “You talked about how Moore would win because he was a man of God.”
    ————————————————————————————————
    I’ve been coming here for 4 years and I never realized how much BL lies. Bitter show me 1 post where I said Moore is going to win because he is a man of God. LOL I did think Moore was going to win but, not because he is a man of God. I thought he was going to win because most polls were showing him with a lead. It’s that simple. Bitter thinks I’m dangerous. 🙂 He obviously doesn’t know much about the Founding Fathers.

    “The greatest contribution that the Founders made to the well-being of America was the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. It is appropriate that we talk about this document in a week when the Constitution is lauded. How is it that this document has endured with only a few amendments? The first 10 are usually viewed as part of the original document and two more—the 18th and the 21st—negated each other (prohibition and repeal). Another handful were easily justified: ending of slavery (13th Amendment); eliminating voting restriction based on race or sex (15th and 19th Amendments); limiting the tenure of the president to two terms (22nd Amendment); and providing for presidential succession (25th Amendment). Why has the basic structure of the document stayed intact?

    The answer to that question is that the Constitution was founded upon what can only be described as a Christian/biblical worldview. One can fairly ask: How can that be? There is no mention of Christianity in the Constitution and Bill of Rights, except for the mention of religion in the First Amendment, and some of the Founders can hardly be described as traditional Christians.

    The 55 men who were delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 were, with few exceptions, Christians. They can correctly be called, the Founders. M.E. Bradford in “A Worthy Company” summarizes their religious views. He writes, “With no more than five exceptions (and perhaps no more than three) they [the 55 delegates] were orthodox members of established Christian communions: Approximately 29 were Anglicans, 16 to 18 Calvinists [Presbyterians and Dutch Reformed], two Methodists, two Lutherans, two Roman Catholics, one lapsed Quaker and sometimes Anglican, and one open Deist—Dr. Ben Franklin.”

    But how can it be shown that the Constitution was shaped by biblical presuppositions? The single most important foundational doctrine in forming a civil government is what is called the “doctrine of man,” or the “doctrine of human nature.” Most of the Founders held to a biblical view that man is depraved, sinful and frail but, through Christ, capable of regeneration. That conventional Christian view of man was predominate among the Founders. Both James Madison and Alexander Hamilton used the term “depravity” to refer to man’s capability to do evil with political power (The Federalist, #37 and #78). Even Jefferson, the least orthodox of the Founders (who incidentally was not a delegate to the Constitutional Convention), said in the Kentucky Resolutions of 1798: “In questions of power, let no more be heard of confidence in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of the Constitution.” How was the Constitution shaped by that view of man?

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    Madison, in Federalist #51, which may be the most important commentary in American political history wrote, “If men were angels, no government would be necessary.” So here is the beginning of the Founders’ view of the need for a civil government. We are sinful and frail and will do wrong—theft, murder and the like. Civil government is a necessity. He continued, “If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.” The depravity which leads to the need for government presents a perplexing problem: Those who govern must of necessity be the very persons we just said were sinful and frail and therefore likely to misrule or tyrannize. Madison again writes, “In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: You must first enable the government to control the governed and in the next place oblige it to control itself. The dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions.”

    These auxiliary precautions are the structures and devices of the Constitution that are built-in barriers to misrule such as separation of powers, dispersal of power among various levels of government, checks and balances, and enumerating of powers. These are devices intended to make the exercise of power by rulers, benignly awkward and safely difficult. Why? The Founders knew the true nature of humankind that is identified in the Bible and part of a Christian worldview. Consequently, they designed a civil government that protected life, liberty and property for America’s citizens—an enduring edifice to freedom.”

    https://www.cnsnews.com/commentary/dr-john-sparks/constitution-was-indeed-founded-upon-christian-worldview-thats-why-it

  663. Bitterlaw says:

    Sheeple – Pretty damning but I don’t know if there is a requirement that FBI agents have to be robots without personal views. It would make for good cross-examination but I doubt it derails the investigation.

  664. MichiganGuy says:

    Did America have a Christian Founding? This disputed question, far from being only of historical interest, has important implications for how we conceive of the role of religion in the American republic. Mark David Hall begins by considering two popular answers to the query—“Of course not!” and “Absolutely!”—both of which distort the Founders’ views. After showing that Christian ideas were one of the important intellectual influences on the Founders, he discusses three major areas of agreement with respect to religious liberty and church–state relations at the time of the Founding: Religious liberty is a right and must be protected; the national government should not create an established church, and states should have them only if they encourage and assist Christianity; and religion belongs in the public square. In short, while America did not have a Christian Founding in the sense of creating a theocracy, its Founding was deeply shaped by Christian moral truths. More important, it created a regime that was hospitable to Christians, but also to practitioners of other religions.

    The role of religion in the American republic has been a source of controversy since the nation’s inception. Debates are particularly fierce when they concern religious liberty and the proper relationship between church and state. Arguments on these questions are often framed in the light of the Founders’ intentions, but unfortunately, their views are often distorted.

    Did America have a Christian Founding? Two popular answers to this query—“Of course not!” and “Absolutely!”—both distort the Founders’ views. There is in fact a great deal of evidence that America’s Founders were influenced by Christian ideas, and there are many ways in which the Founders’ views might inform contemporary political and legal controversies.

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    Two Common but Mistaken Answers

    According to those who answer “Of course not!” America’s Founders were guided by secular ideas and self, class, or state interests. These scholars do not deny that the Founders were religious, but they contend that they were mostly deists—i.e., persons who reject many Christian doctrines and who think God does not interfere in the affairs of men and nations.

    For instance, historian Frank Lambert writes that “[the] significance of the Enlightenment and Deism for the birth of the American republic, and especially the relationship between church and state within it, can hardly be overstated.” Similarly, University of Chicago law professor Geoffrey Stone avers that “deistic beliefs played a central role in the framing of the American republic” and that the “Founding generation viewed religion, and particularly religion’s relation to government, through an Enlightenment lens that was deeply skeptical of orthodox Christianity.” Virtually identical claims are made by Edwin Gaustad, Steven Waldman, Richard Hughes, Steven Keillor, David Holmes, Brooke Allen, and many others.[1]

    In addition to asserting that the Founders were deists, these authors regularly contend that they abandoned their ancestors’ intolerant approach to church–state relations and embraced religious liberty. They often concede that some Founders thought civic authorities should support religion but argue that this is irrelevant as Jefferson’s and Madison’s conviction that there should be a high wall of separation between church and state was written into the Constitution and reinforced by the First Amendment. As we shall see, there are significant problems with this story.

    The second answer to this question is offered by popular Christian writers such as Peter Marshall, David Manuel, John Eidsmoe, Tim LaHaye, William J. Federer, David Barton, and Gary DeMar. They contend that not only did America have a Christian Founding, but virtually all of the Founders were devout, orthodox Christians who consciously drew from their religious convictions to answer most political questions.

    To support their case, these writers are fond of finding religious quotations from the Founders. The rule seems to be that if a Founder utters anything religious, at any time in his life, he counts as an orthodox or even evangelical Christian Founder. Using this methodology, Tim LaHaye concludes, for instance, that John Adams was “deeply committed to Jesus Christ and the use of Biblical principles in governing the nation,” and George Washington, if he was alive today, “would freely associate with the Bible-believing branch of evangelical Christianity that is having such a positive influence upon our nation.”[2] This approach leads to similarly bad history.

    What Exactly Would a Christian Founding Look Like?

    In order to answer the question “Did America have a Christian Founding?” properly, we must first understand it. Let us begin by considering what, exactly, would constitute a Christian Founding?

    One possibility is simply that the Founders identified themselves as Christians. Clearly, they did. In 1776, every European American, with the exception of about 2,500 Jews, identified himself or herself as a Christian. Moreover, approximately 98 percent of the colonists were Protestants, with the remaining 1.9 percent being Roman Catholics.[3]

    But this reality is not particularly interesting. These men and women might have been bad Christians, they may have been Christians significantly influenced by non-Christian ideas, or they may even have been Christians self-consciously attempting to create a secular political order.

    Second, we might mean that the Founders were all sincere Christians. Yet sincerity is very difficult for the scholars, or anyone else, to judge. In most cases, the historical record gives us little with which to work. And even if we can determine, say, that a particular Founder was a member, regular attendee, and even officer in a church, it does not necessarily mean he was a sincere Christian. Perhaps he did these things simply because society expected it of him.

    Third, we might mean that the Founders were orthodox Christians. In some cases—for example, Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry, John Jay, Roger Sherman, and John Witherspoon—there is abundant evidence that these Founders embraced and articulated orthodox Christian ideas. But the lack of records often makes it difficult to speak with confidence on this issue.

    Nevertheless, in light of the many and powerful claims that the Founders were deists, it should be noted that there is virtually no evidence that more than a handful of civic leaders in the Founding era—notably Benjamin Franklin, Ethan Allen, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and (if we count him as an American) Tom Paine—embraced anything approximating this view. Moreover, a good argument can be made that even these Founders were influenced by Christianity in significant ways—and it certainly does not follow that they desired the strict separation of church and state.[4]

    A fourth possibility is that the Founders acted as Christians in their private and/or public lives. Some historians have argued that the Founding cannot be called Christian because some Founders did not join churches, take communion, or remain faithful to their spouses. Moreover, in their public capacity, they did not act in a Christian manner because they did things such as fight an unjust war against England and did not immediately abolish slavery.[5]

    In some cases, these critiques do not take into account historical context, such as the difficulty of joining Calvinist churches in 18th century America. In others, they neglect the traditional Christian teaching that even saints sin. If the standard of being a Christian is moral perfection, no one has ever been a Christian. Most egregious, it is profoundly unhistorical to judge the Founders by specific policy outcomes that seem perfectly clear to 21st century Christians.

    This is not to say that biblical principles are relativistic, but their applications to specific issues in particular times and places may vary or be unclear. To take a contemporary example, one should be very careful in saying, for instance, that someone is a good Christian politician only if she votes for (or against) tax cuts or national health care.

    A final possibility is that the Founders were influenced by Christian ideas. Scholars have spent a great amount of time attempting to discern influence. Book after book has been written about whether the Founders were most influenced by Lockean liberalism, classical republicanism, the Scottish Enlightenment, etc.

    I believe that this is the most reasonable way to approach the question “Did America have a Christian Founding?” In doing so, it is important to note that nominal Christians might be influenced by Christian ideas, just as it is possible for an orthodox Christian to be influenced by non-Christian ideas. I believe that an excellent case can be made that Christianity had a profound influence on the Founders.[6]

    Before proceeding, I should emphasize that I am not arguing that Christianity was the only significant influence on America’s Founders or that it influenced each Founder in the exact same manner. Clearly there were a variety of different, but often overlapping, intellectual influences in the era.[7] The Founders were also informed by the Anglo–American political–legal tradition and their own political experience, and like all humans, they were motivated to varying degrees by self, class, or state interests. My contention is merely that orthodox Christianity had a very significant influence on America’s Founders and that this influence is often overlooked by students of the American Founding.

    What Constitutes America’s Founding?

    I have assumed here that America was founded in the late 18th century, but some authors have argued, in the words of Gary DeMar, that our “nation begins not in 1776, but more than one hundred fifty years earlier.”[8] Let us consider three major possibilities that might count as the country’s founding: (1) the establishment of colonial governments in the 17th century, (2) America’s break with Great Britain in the 1770s, and (3) the creation of a new constitutional order in the 1780s and 1790s.

    1. America’s Colonial Origins

    Few doubt that Puritans were serious Christians attempting to create, in the words of Massachusetts Governor John Winthrop, “a shining city upon a hill” (a reference to Matthew 5:14). Puritans separated church and state, but they clearly thought the two institutions should work in tandem to support, protect, and promote true Christianity.

    Other colonies, however, are often described as being significantly different from those in New England. Historian John Fea, for instance, contends that “the real appeal of Jamestown was economic opportunity and the very real possibility of striking it rich.”[9] It is certainly the case that colonists were attracted to the New World by economic opportunity (in New England as well as in the South), and yet even in the southern colonies the protection and promotion of Christianity was more important than many authors assume. For instance, Virginia’s 1610 legal code begins:

    Whereas his Majesty, like himself a most zealous prince, has in his own realms a principal care of true religion and reverence to God and has always strictly commanded his generals and governors, with all his forces wheresoever, to let their ways be, like his ends, for the glory of God….

    The first three articles of this text go on to state that the colonists have embarked on a “sacred cause,” to mandate regular church attendance, and to proclaim that anyone who speaks impiously against the Trinity or who blasphemes God’s name will be put to death.[10]

    Early colonial laws and constitutions such as the Mayflower Compact, the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, and Massachusetts Body of Liberties are filled with such language—and in some cases, they incorporate biblical texts wholesale. Perhaps more surprisingly, tolerant, Quaker Pennsylvania was more similar to Puritan New England than many realize. The Charter of Liberties and Frame of Government of the Province of Pennsylvania (1681) begins by making it clear that God has ordained government, and it even quotes Romans 13 to this effect. Article 38 of the document lists “offenses against God” that may be punished by the magistrate, including:

    swearing, cursing, lying, profane talking, drunkenness, drinking of healths, obscene words, incest, sodomy…stage-plays, cards, dice, May-games, gamesters, masques, revels, bull-baiting, cock-fighting, bear-baiting, and the like, which excite the people to rudeness, cruelty, looseness, and irreligion….[11]

    An extensive survey of early colonial constitutions and laws reveals many similar provisions. As well, at least nine of the 13 colonies had established churches, and all required officeholders to be Christians—or, in some cases, Protestants. Quaker Pennsylvania, for instance, expected officeholders to be “such as possess faith in Jesus Christ.”[12]

    If one is to understand the story of the United States of America, it is important to have a proper appreciation for its Christian colonial roots. By almost any measure, colonists of European descent who settled in the New World were serious Christians whose constitutions, laws, and practices reflected the influence of Christianity. Although some authors refer to this “planting” as a “founding,” such a designation is rare among scholars. Instead, most scholars consider America to have been founded in the late 18th century around one of, or some combination of, two major events: the War for Independence and the creation of America’s constitutional order.

    2. The War for Independence

    On the surface, the War for American Independence appears to be an inherently un-Christian event. The Apostle Paul, in Romans 13, seems to leave little room for revolution: “Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained by God. Whosoever therefore resists the power, resists the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation.”

    Historically, Christian thinkers have taken this and similar biblical passages to prohibit rebellion against civic authorities. However, in the 12th century, some Christian scholars began to allow for the possibility that inferior magistrates might overthrow evil kings. These ideas were developed and significantly expanded by the Protestant Reformers. John Calvin, the most politically conservative of these men, contended that, in some cases, inferior magistrates might resist an ungodly ruler. However, Reformed leaders such as John Knox, George Buchanan, and Samuel Rutherford of Scotland, Stephanus Junius Brutus and Theodore Beza of France, and Christopher Goodman and John Ponet of England argued that inferior magistrates must resist unjust rulers and even permitted or required citizens to do so.

    It is worth noting that all of these men wrote before Locke published his Two Treatises of Government and that this tradition was profoundly influential in America. Indeed, between 55 percent and 75 percent of white citizens in this era associated themselves with Calvinist churches, and members of the tradition were significantly overrepresented among American intellectual elites.[13]

    The influence of the Reformed political tradition in the Founding era is manifested in a variety of ways, but particularly noteworthy is the almost unanimous support Calvinist clergy offered to American patriots. This was noticed by the other side, as suggested by the Loyalist Peter Oliver, who railed against the “black Regiment, the dissenting Clergy, who took so active a part in the Rebellion.” King George himself reportedly referred to the War for Independence as “a Presbyterian Rebellion.” From the English perspective, British Major Harry Rooke was largely correct when he confiscated a presumably Calvinist book from an American prisoner and remarked that “[i]t is your G-d Damned Religion of this Country that ruins the Country; Damn your religion.”[14]

    The Declaration of Independence, the most famous document produced by the Continental Congress during the War for Independence, proclaims: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” As well, this text references “the laws of nature and of nature’s God” and closes by “appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world” and noting the signers’ “reliance on the protection of divine Providence.” The Founders’ use of Christian rhetoric and arguments becomes even more evident if one looks at other statements of colonial rights and concerns such as the Suffolk Resolves, the Declaration of Rights, and the Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking up Arms—to say nothing of the dozen explicitly Christian calls for prayer, fasting, and thanksgiving issued by the Continental and Confederation Congresses.[15]

    Some scholars have argued that the use of “distant” words for God or “vague and generic God-language” like “Nature’s God,” Creator,” and “Providence” in the Declaration and other texts is evidence that the Founders were deists.[16] However, indisputably orthodox Christians regularly used such appellations.

    For instance, the Westminster Standards (a classic Reformed confession of faith), both in the original 1647 version and in the 1788 American revision, refer to the deity as “the Supreme Judge,” “the great Creator of all things,” “the first cause,” “righteous judge,” “God the Creator,” and “the supreme Law and King of all the world.” The Standards also regularly reference God’s providence and even proclaim that “[t]he light of nature showeth that there is a God….” Similarly, Isaac Watts, the “father of English Hymnody,” referred to the deity as “nature’s God” in a poem about Psalm 148: 10. Jeffry H. Morrison has argued persuasively that the Declaration’s references to “‘divine Providence’ and ‘the Supreme Judge of the World’ would have been quite acceptable to Reformed Americans in 1776, and conjured up images of the ‘distinctly biblical God’ when they heard or read the Declaration.”[17]

    It may be objected that Jefferson, the man who drafted the Declaration, was hardly an orthodox Christian, and that is certainly the case. But this is beside the point. As Jefferson himself pointed out in an 1825 letter, the object of the document was not to “find out new principles, or new arguments…. [I]t was intended to be an expression of the American mind, and to give that expression the proper tone and spirit called for by the occasion. All its authority rests then on the harmonizing sentiments of the day.…”[18] Even though Jefferson believed in a vague, distant deity, when his fellow delegates revised and approved the Declaration, virtually all of them understood “Nature’s God,” “Creator,” and “Providence” to refer to the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob: a God who is active in the affairs of men and nations.

    3. The Creation of America’s Constitutional Order

    In light of the above discussion, it is perhaps surprising that the Constitution says little about God or religion. Of course, there are hints that America is a Christian nation (e.g., a pocket veto occurs 10 days after a bill is passed by Congress, Sundays excepted), but these seem to be more than balanced by Article VI’s prohibition of religious tests for federal offices. The only specific mention of God is found in the date the Constitution was written: “in the Year of our Lord 1787.”

    What is going on? Some have argued that America began as a Christian country but that the authors of the Constitution recognized that this was not a good thing, and so they created, in the words of Isaac Kramnick and R. Laurence Moore, a “Godless Constitution.” To reinforce this point, the Founders added the First Amendment to the Constitution, which begins “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof….”[19]

    On the surface, this is a plausible hypothesis, and a few Founding-era documents such as James Madison’s “Memorial and Remonstrance” (1785) and Thomas Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists (1802) seem to offer some support for this view. As we shall see, this interpretation of the Founding is inaccurate even with respect to Jefferson and Madison, and if one looks beyond them to the hundreds of men who attended the Federal Convention of 1787, participated in the state ratification conventions, and were elected to the first federal Congress, it becomes completely implausible. These individuals, without exception, called themselves Christians, and a good case can be made that many were influenced by orthodox Christian ideas in important ways.

    This argument is made well in broad strokes by Barry Alan Shain in The Myth of American Individualism: The Protestant Origins of American Political Thought. It also receives interesting empirical support from Donald Lutz, who examined 15,000 pamphlets, articles, and books on political subjects published in the late 18th century. His study found that the Bible was cited far more often than any other book, article, or pamphlet. In fact, the Founders referenced the Bible more than all Enlightenment authors combined.[20]

    If Shain and Lutz make the argument for Christian influence in broad strokes, others have made it in finer strokes through studies of individual Founders. For instance, I have co-edited four books that collectively shine light on 26 different Founders and several major traditions. These books, along with a number of other articles and books on less famous Founders, demonstrate that there is little evidence that the Founders as a group were deists who desired the separation of church and state.[21]

    Before discussing the positive influence of Christian ideas on the American Founders, let me briefly suggest the central reason why the Constitution appears to be “Godless.” Simply put, the Founders were creating a national government for a very few limited purposes—notably those enumerated in Article I, Section 8. There was almost universal agreement that if there was to be legislation on religious or moral matters, it should be done by state and local governments.[22]

    In fact, states remained active in this business well into the 20th century. It is true that the last state church was disestablished in 1832, but many states retained religious tests for public office, had laws aimed at restricting vice, required prayer in schools, and so forth. Because the federal government was not to be concerned with these issues, they were not addressed in the Constitution. The First Amendment merely reinforced this understanding with respect to the faith—i.e., Congress has no power to establish a national church or restrict the free exercise of religion.[23]

    Even though Christianity is not mentioned in the Constitution or Bill or Rights, the Founders of the American republic were influenced by Christian ideas in significant ways. For example:

    Their faith taught them that humans were sinful. As James Madison wrote in Federalist No. 51, “If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external or internal controls on government would be necessary.” This conviction led them to avoid utopian experiments such as those later pursued during the French Revolution and to adopt a constitutional system characterized by separated powers, checks and balances, and federalism. Many Enlightenment thinkers in this era, by way of contrast, tended to favor a strong, centralized government run by experts.[24]
    They firmly believed that God ordained moral standards, that legislation should be made in accordance with these standards, and that moral laws took precedence over human laws. This conviction manifests itself in their abstract reflections (e.g., James Wilson’s law lectures, parts of which read like St. Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologica) and practical decisions (e.g., all but one Supreme Court Justice prior to John Marshall argued publicly that the Court could strike down an act of Congress if it violated natural law).[25]
    Similarly, Christianity informed the Founders’ understanding of substantive concepts such as “liberty.” Barry Shain has identified eight different ways in which the word was used in the 18th century. Only one of these is related to the excessively individualistic way the term is often used today. Instead, the Founders were far more likely to see liberty as the freedom to do what is morally correct, as illustrated by United States Supreme Court Justice James Wilson’s marvelous dictum: “Without liberty, law loses its nature and its name, and becomes oppression. Without law, liberty also loses its nature and its name, and becomes licentiousness.”[26]
    America’s Founders believed that humans were created in the imago dei—the image of God. Part of what this means is that humans are reasonable beings. This led them to conclude that we the people (as opposed to the elite) can order our public lives together through politics rather than force. It also helped inform early (and later) American opposition to slavery.[27]
    Faith led many Founders to conclude that religious liberty should be extensively protected. Yet many also thought that civic authorities should encourage Christianity and that it is appropriate to use religious language in the public square. By the late 18th century, some Founders were beginning to question the wisdom of religious establishments, primarily because they thought that such establishments hurt true religion. The Founders’ views on these questions have the most immediate and obvious policy and legal implications, so I will address them in some detail.
    The Founders on Church and State

    In the 1947 Supreme Court decision of Everson v. Board of Education, Justice Wiley Rutledge proclaimed that “no provision of the Constitution is more closely tied to or given content by its generating history than the religious clause of the First Amendment. It is at once the refined product and the terse summation of that history.” Like many jurists and academics since, he proceeded to argue that the Founders intended the First Amendment to create a strict separation of church and state. As evidence, he relied almost solely on statements by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, most taken out of context and made before or well after the Religion Clauses were drafted.[28]

    Yet consideration of a wide range of Founders and their public actions shows that few if any embraced anything approximating modern conceptions of the separation of church and state. Of course, they differed among themselves, but it is possible to identify three major areas of agreement with respect to religious liberty and church–state relations.

    Consensus #1: Religious Liberty Is a Right and Must be Protected.

    To a person, the Founders were committed to protecting religious liberty. This conviction was usually based upon the theological principle that humans have a duty to worship God as their consciences dictate. A good illustration of this is George Mason’s 1776 draft of Article XVI of Virginia’s Declaration of Rights. It reads:

    That as Religion, or the Duty which we owe to our divine and omnipotent Creator, and the Manner of discharging it, can be governed only by Reason and Conviction, not by Force or Violence; and therefore that all Men shou’d enjoy the fullest Toleration in the Exercise of Religion, according to the Dictates of Conscience, unpunished and unrestrained by the Magistrate….

    James Madison, in his first significant public act, objected to the use of “toleration” in the article, believing that it implied that religious liberty was a grant from the state that could be revoked at will. The Virginia Convention agreed, and Article XVI was amended to make it clear that “the free exercise of religion” is a right, not a privilege granted by the state.[29]

    Mason’s draft of Article XVI was reprinted throughout the states and had an important impact on subsequent state constitutions and the national Bill of Rights. By the end of the Revolutionary era, every state offered significant protection of religious liberty. The federal Constitution of 1787 did not, but only because its supporters believed the national government did not have the delegated power to pass laws interfering with religious belief or practice. In the face of popular outcry, the first Congress proposed and the states ratified a constitutional amendment prohibiting Congress from restricting the free exercise of religion.

    Scholars and jurists debate the exact scope of religious liberty protected by the First Amendment. For instance, it is unclear whether the amendment requires religious minorities to be exempted from neutral laws. (For example, does the Free Exercise Clause require Congress to exempt religious pacifists from conscription into the military?) But at a minimum, it prohibits Congress from, in the words of James Madison, compelling “men to worship God in any manner contrary to their conscience.”[30]

    Consensus #2: States Should Have Established Churches Only If They Encourage and Assist Christianity.

    In 1775, at least nine of the 13 colonies had established churches. Although establishments took a variety of forms, they generally entailed the state providing favorable treatment for one denomination—treatment which often included financial support. Members of religious denominations other than the official established church were usually tolerated, but they were occasionally taxed to support the state church, and some were not permitted to hold civic office.

    After independence, most states either disestablished their churches (particularly states where the Church of England was previously established) or moved to a system of “plural” or “multiple” establishments. Under the latter model, citizens were taxed to support their own churches. Although a few Founders challenged establishments of any sort in the name of religious liberty, most arguments were framed in terms of which arrangement would be best for Christianity.

    A good illustration of the last point may be found in two petitions from Westmoreland County that arrived at the Virginia General Assembly on the same day regarding Patrick Henry’s 1784 proposal to provide state funds to a variety of churches. The first supported Henry’s bill, arguing, much like public-sector unions today, that state subsidies are necessary to keep salaries high enough to attract the best candidates into the ministry.

    Opponents of Henry’s plan disagreed, responding that assessments were against “the spirit of the Gospel,” that “the Holy Author of our Religion” did not require state support, and that Christianity was far purer before “Constantine first established Christianity by human Laws.” Rejecting their fellow petitioners’ arguments that government support was necessary to attract good candidates to the ministry, they argued that clergy should manifest:

    that they are inwardly moved by the Holy Ghost to take upon them that Office, that they seek the good of Mankind and not worldly Interest. Let their doctrines be scriptural and their Lives upright. Then shall Religion (if departed) speedily return, and Deism be put to open shame, and its dreaded Consequences removed.[31]

    This petition was significantly more popular than James Madison’s now-famous “Memorial and Remonstrance,” another petition written to oppose Henry’s plan. Madison’s memorial has often been referenced to shine light on the First Amendment, and it is regularly treated as a rationalist, secular argument for religious liberty. But, as in the Virginia Declaration, Madison argues that the right to religious liberty is unalienable “because what is here a right towards men, is a duty towards the Creator.” As well, he noted that “ecclesiastical establishments, instead of maintaining the purity and efficacy of Religion, have had a contrary operation” and that “the bill is adverse to the diffusion of the light of Christianity.”[32]

    America’s Founders were committed to the idea that religion (by which virtually all of them meant Christianity) was necessary for public happiness and political prosperity. This view was so widespread that James Hutson has called it “the Founders’ syllogism.”[33] The key question with respect to particular establishments at the state level was whether they helped or hurt the faith.

    Consensus #3: Religion Belongs in the Public Square.

    In 1802, Thomas Jefferson penned a letter to the Danbury Baptist Association in which he famously suggested that the First Amendment created a “wall of separation between Church & State.” This metaphor lay dormant with respect to the Supreme Court’s Establishment Clause jurisprudence until 1947, when Justice Hugo Black seized upon it as the definitive statement of the Founders’ views on church–state relations.[34]

    As appealing as the wall metaphor is to contemporary advocates of the strict separation of church and state, it obscures far more than it illuminates. Leaving aside the fact that Jefferson was in Europe when the Constitution and Bill of Rights were written, that the letter was a profoundly political document, and that Jefferson used the metaphor only once in his life, it is not even clear that it sheds useful light upon Jefferson’s views, much less those of his far more traditional colleagues.

    Jefferson issued calls for prayer and fasting as governor of Virginia, and in his revision of Virginia’s statutes, he drafted bills stipulating when the governor could appoint “days of public fasting and humiliation, or thanksgiving” and to punish “Disturbers of Religious Worship and Sabbath Breakers.” As a member of the Continental Congress, he proposed that the nation adopt a seal containing the image of Moses “extending his hand over the sea, caus[ing] it to overwhelm Pharaoh,” and the motto “Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God.” He closed his second inaugural address by encouraging all Americans to join him in seeking “the favor of that Being in whose hands we are, who led our forefathers, as Israel of old….” And two days after completing his letter to the Danbury Baptists, he attended church services in the U.S. Capitol, where he heard John Leland, the great Baptist minister and opponent of religious establishments, preach.[35]

    The point is not that Jefferson was a pious man who wanted a union between church and state. His private letters make it clear that he was not an orthodox Christian, and his public arguments and actions demonstrate that he favored a stricter separation between church and state than virtually any other Founder. Yet even Jefferson, at least in his actions, did not attempt to completely remove religion from the public square, and what Jefferson did not completely exclude, most Founders embraced.

    This point may be illustrated in a variety of ways, but a particularly useful exercise is to look at the first Congress, the body that crafted the First Amendment. One of Congress’s first acts was to agree to appoint and pay congressional chaplains. Shortly after doing so, it reauthorized the Northwest Ordinance, which held that “Religion, morality, and knowledge being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged.”[36]

    More significantly for understanding the First Amendment, on the day after the House approved the final wording of the Bill of Rights, Elias Boudinot, later president of the American Bible Society, proposed that the President recommend a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. In response to objections that such a practice mimicked European customs or should be done by the states, Roger Sherman, according to a contemporary newspaper account:

    justified the practice of thanksgiving, on any signal event, not only as a laudable one in itself, but as warranted by a number of precedents in holy writ: for instance, the solemn thanksgivings and rejoicings which took place in the time of Solomon, after the building of the temple, was a case in point. This example, he thought, worthy of Christian imitation on the present occasion; and he would agree with the gentleman who moved the resolution.[37]

    The House agreed, as did the Senate, as did the President. The result was George Washington’s famous 1789 Thanksgiving Day Proclamation. The text of his proclamation is worth quoting at some length:

    Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor…

    I do recommend…the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be….

    And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions, to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually; to render our national government a blessing to all the People….[38]

    Similar proclamations were routinely issued by Presidents Washington, Adams, and Madison. Jefferson, it is true, refused to formally issue such proclamations, yet as Daniel L. Dreisbach has pointed out, he “employed rhetoric in official utterances that, in terms of religious content, was virtually indistinguishable from the traditional thanksgiving day proclamations.”[39]

    America’s Founders did not want Congress to establish a national church, and many opposed establishments at the state level as well. Yet they believed, as George Washington declared in his Farewell Address, that of “all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, Religion and morality are indispensable supports.”[40] Moreover, almost without exception, they agreed that civic authorities could promote and encourage Christianity and that it was appropriate for elected officials to make religious arguments in the public square. There was virtually no support for contemporary visions of a separation of church and state that would have political leaders avoid religious language and require public spaces to be stripped of religious symbols.

    Conclusions

    So did America have a Christian Founding? History is complicated, and we should always be suspicious of simple answers to difficult questions. As we have seen, there is precious little evidence that the Founders were deists, wanted religion excluded from the public square, or desired the strict separation of church and state. On the other hand, they identified themselves as Christians, were influenced in important ways by Christian ideas, and generally thought it appropriate for civic authorities to encourage Christianity.

    What do these facts mean for Americans who embrace non-Christian faiths or no faith at all? Although the Founders were profoundly influenced by Christianity, they did not design a constitutional order only for fellow believers. They explicitly prohibited religious tests for federal offices, and they were committed to the proposition that all men and women should be free to worship God (or not) as their consciences dictate.

    As evidenced by George Washington’s 1790 letter to a “Hebrew Congregation” in Newport, Rhode Island, the new nation was to be open to a wide array of individuals who were willing to assume the responsibilities of citizenship:

    All [citizens] possess alike liberty and conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it was by the indulgence of one class of people, that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens, in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.

    …May the Children of the Stock of Abraham, who dwell in this land, continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other Inhabitants; while every one shall sit in safety under his own vine and fig tree, and there shall be none to make him afraid. May the father of all mercies scatter light and not darkness in our paths, and make us all in our several vocations useful here, and in his own due time and way everlastingly happy.[41]

    Yet it does not follow from this openness that Americans should simply forget about their country’s Christian roots. Anyone interested in an accurate account of the nation’s past cannot afford to ignore the important influence of faith on many Americans, from the Puritans to the present day.

    Christian ideas underlie some key tenets of America’s constitutional order. For instance, the Founders believed that humans are created in the image of God, which led them to design institutions and laws meant to protect and promote human dignity. Because they were convinced that humans are sinful, they attempted to avoid the concentration of power by framing a national government with carefully enumerated powers. As well, the Founders were committed to liberty, but they never imagined that provisions of the Bill of Rights would be used to protect licentiousness. And they clearly thought moral considerations should inform legislation.

    America has drifted from these first principles. We would do well to reconsider the wisdom of these changes.

    The Founders believed it permissible for the national and state governments to encourage Christianity, but this may no longer be prudential in our increasingly pluralistic country. Yet the Constitution does not mandate a secular polity, and we should be wary of jurists, politicians, and academics who would strip religion from the public square. We should certainly reject arguments that America’s Founders intended the First Amendment to prohibit neutral programs that support faith-based social service agencies, religious schools, and the like.[42]

    Finally, we ignore at our peril the Founders’ insight that democracy requires a moral people and that faith is an important, if not indispensable, support for morality. Such faith may well flourish best without government support, but it should not have to flourish in the face of government hostility.

    http://www.heritage.org/political-process/report/did-america-have-christian-founding

  665. MichiganGuy says:

    The Founding Fathers on Jesus, Christianity and the Bible
    A Few Declarations of Founding Fathers and Early Statesmen on Jesus, Christianity, and the Bible
    (This list is by no means exhaustive; many other Founders could be included,
    and even with those who appear below, additional quotes could have been used.)

    John Adams

    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; JUDGE; DIPLOMAT; ONE OF TWO SIGNERS
    OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS; SECOND PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
    The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.1

    Without religion, this world would be something not fit to be mentioned in polite company: I mean hell.2

    The Christian religion is, above all the religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern times, the religion of wisdom, virtue, equity and humanity.3

    Suppose a nation in some distant region should take the Bible for their only law book and every member should regulate his conduct by the precepts there exhibited. . . . What a Eutopia – what a Paradise would this region be!4

    I have examined all religions, and the result is that the Bible is the best book in the world.5

    John Quincy Adams

    SIXTH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES; DIPLOMAT; SECRETARY OF STATE; U. S. SENATOR;
    U. S. REPRESENTATIVE; “OLD MAN ELOQUENT”; “HELL-HOUND OF ABOLITION”
    My hopes of a future life are all founded upon the Gospel of Christ and I cannot cavil or quibble away [evade or object to]. . . . the whole tenor of His conduct by which He sometimes positively asserted and at others countenances [permits] His disciples in asserting that He was God.6
    The hope of a Christian is inseparable from his faith. Whoever believes in the Divine inspiration of the Holy Scriptures must hope that the religion of Jesus shall prevail throughout the earth. Never since the foundation of the world have the prospects of mankind been more encouraging to that hope than they appear to be at the present time. And may the associated distribution of the Bible proceed and prosper till the Lord shall have made “bare His holy arm in the eyes of all the nations, and all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God” [Isaiah 52:10].7

    In the chain of human events, the birthday of the nation is indissolubly linked with the birthday of the Savior. The Declaration of Independence laid the cornerstone of human government upon the first precepts of Christianity.8

    Samuel Adams
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; “FATHER OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION”; RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION; GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS
    I . . . [rely] upon the merits of Jesus Christ for a pardon of all my sins.9
    The name of the Lord (says the Scripture) is a strong tower; thither the righteous flee and are safe [Proverbs 18:10]. Let us secure His favor and He will lead us through the journey of this life and at length receive us to a better.10

    I conceive we cannot better express ourselves than by humbly supplicating the Supreme Ruler of the world . . . that the confusions that are and have been among the nations may be overruled by the promoting and speedily bringing in the holy and happy period when the kingdoms of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ may be everywhere established, and the people willingly bow to the scepter of Him who is the Prince of Peace.11

    He also called on the State of Massachusetts to pray that . . .

    the peaceful and glorious reign of our Divine Redeemer may be known and enjoyed throughout the whole family of mankind.12
    we may with one heart and voice humbly implore His gracious and free pardon through Jesus Christ, supplicating His Divine aid . . . [and] above all to cause the religion of Jesus Christ, in its true spirit, to spread far and wide till the whole earth shall be filled with His glory.13
    with true contrition of heart to confess their sins to God and implore forgiveness through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ our Savior.14
    Josiah Bartlett

    MILITARY OFFICER; SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE;
    JUDGE; GOVERNOR OF NEW HAMPSHIRE
    Called on the people of New Hampshire . . .
    to confess before God their aggravated transgressions and to implore His pardon and forgiveness through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ . . . [t]hat the knowledge of the Gospel of Jesus Christ may be made known to all nations, pure and undefiled religion universally prevail, and the earth be fill with the glory of the Lord.15
    Gunning Bedford
    MILITARY OFFICER; MEMBER OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS;
    SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; FEDERAL JUDGE
    To the triune God – the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost – be ascribed all honor and dominion, forevermore – Amen.16
    Elias Boudinot
    PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS; SIGNED THE PEACE TREATY TO END THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION; FIRST ATTORNEY ADMITTED TO THE U. S. SUPREME COURT BAR; FRAMER OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS; DIRECTOR OF THE U. S. MINT
    Let us enter on this important business under the idea that we are Christians on whom the eyes of the world are now turned… [L]et us earnestly call and beseech Him, for Christ’s sake, to preside in our councils. . . . We can only depend on the all powerful influence of the Spirit of God, Whose Divine aid and assistance it becomes us as a Christian people most devoutly to implore. Therefore I move that some minister of the Gospel be requested to attend this Congress every morning . . . in order to open the meeting with prayer.17
    A letter to his daughter:

    You have been instructed from your childhood in the knowledge of your lost state by nature – the absolute necessity of a change of heart and an entire renovation of soul to the image of Jesus Christ – of salvation through His meritorious righteousness only – and the indispensable necessity of personal holiness without which no man shall see the Lord [Hebrews 12:14]. You are well acquainted that the most perfect and consummate doctrinal knowledge is of no avail without it operates on and sincerely affects the heart, changes the practice, and totally influences the will – and that without the almighty power of the Spirit of God enlightening your mind, subduing your will, and continually drawing you to Himself, you can do nothing. . . . And may the God of your parents (for many generations past) seal instruction to your soul and lead you to Himself through the blood of His too greatly despised Son, Who notwithstanding, is still reclaiming the world to God through that blood, not imputing to them their sins. To Him be glory forever!18

    For nearly half a century have I anxiously and critically studied that invaluable treasure [the Bible]; and I still scarcely ever take it up that I do not find something new – that I do not receive some valuable addition to my stock of knowledge or perceive some instructive fact never observed before. In short, were you to ask me to recommend the most valuable book in the world, I should fix on the Bible as the most instructive both to the wise and ignorant. Were you to ask me for one affording the most rational and pleasing entertainment to the inquiring mind, I should repeat, it is the Bible; and should you renew the inquiry for the best philosophy or the most interesting history, I should still urge you to look into your Bible. I would make it, in short, the Alpha and Omega of knowledge.19

    Jacob Broom
    LEGISLATOR; SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION
    A letter to his son, James, attending Princeton University:
    I flatter myself you will be what I wish, but don’t be so much flatterer as to relax of your application – don’t forget to be a Christian. I have said much to you on this head, and I hope an indelible impression is made.20

    Charles Carroll
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; SELECTED AS DELEGATE TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION; FRAMER OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS; U. S. SENATOR
    On the mercy of my Redeemer I rely for salvation and on His merits, not on the works I have done in obedience to His precepts.21
    Grateful to Almighty God for the blessings which, through Jesus Christ Our Lord, He had conferred on my beloved country in her emancipation and on myself in permitting me, under circumstances of mercy, to live to the age of 89 years, and to survive the fiftieth year of independence, adopted by Congress on the 4th of July 1776, which I originally subscribed on the 2d day of August of the same year and of which I am now the last surviving signer.22

    I, Charles Carroll. . . . give and bequeath my soul to God who gave it, my body to the earth, hoping that through and by the merits, sufferings, and mediation of my only Savior and Jesus Christ, I may be admitted into the Kingdom prepared by God for those who love, fear and truly serve Him.23

    Congress, 1854
    The great, vital, and conservative element in our system is the belief of our people in the pure doctrines and the divine truths of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.24
    Congress, U. S. House Judiciary Committee, 1854
    Had the people, during the Revolution, had a suspicion of any attempt to war against Christianity, that Revolution would have been strangled in its cradle… In this age, there can be no substitute for Christianity… That was the religion of the founders of the republic and they expected it to remain the religion of their descendants.25
    John Dickinson
    SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; GOVERNOR OF PENNSYLVANIA; GOVERNOR OF DELAWARE; GENERAL IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
    Rendering thanks to my Creator for my existence and station among His works, for my birth in a country enlightened by the Gospel and enjoying freedom, and for all His other kindnesses, to Him I resign myself, humbly confiding in His goodness and in His mercy through Jesus Christ for the events of eternity.26
    [Governments] could not give the rights essential to happiness… We claim them from a higher source: from the King of kings, and Lord of all the earth.27

    Gabriel Duvall
    SOLDIER; JUDGE; SELECTED AS DELEGATE TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION;
    COMPTROLLER OF THE U. S. TREASURY; U. S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE
    I resign my soul into the hands of the Almighty Who gave it, in humble hopes of His mercy through our Savior Jesus Christ.28
    Benjamin Franklin
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION; DIPLOMAT; PRINTER; SCIENTIST;
    SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; GOVERNOR OF PENNSYLVANIA
    As to Jesus of Nazareth, my opinion of whom you particularly desire, I think the system of morals and His religion as He left them to us, the best the world ever saw or is likely to see.29
    The body of Benjamin Franklin, printer, like the cover of an old book, its contents torn out and stripped of its lettering and guilding, lies here, food for worms. Yet the work itself shall not be lost; for it will, as he believed, appear once more in a new and more beatiful edition, corrected and amended by the Author.30 (FRANKLIN’S EULOGY THAT HE WROTE FOR HIMSELF)

    Elbridge Gerry
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE;
    MEMBER OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION; FRAMER OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS,
    GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS, VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
    He called on the State of Massachusetts to pray that . . .
    with one heart and voice we may prostrate ourselves at the throne of heavenly grace and present to our Great Benefactor sincere and unfeigned thanks for His infinite goodness and mercy towards us from our birth to the present moment for having above all things illuminated us by the Gospel of Jesus Christ, presenting to our view the happy prospect of a blessed immortality.31
    And for our unparalleled ingratitude to that Adorable Being Who has seated us in a land irradiated by the cheering beams of the Gospel of Jesus Christ . . . let us fall prostrate before offended Deity, confess sincerely and penitently our manifold sins and our unworthiness of the least of His Divine favors, fervently implore His pardon through the merits of our mediator.32
    And deeply impressed with a scene of our unparalleled ingratitude, let us contemplate the blessings which have flowed from the unlimited grave and favor of offended Deity, that we are still permitted to enjoy the first of Heaven’s blessings: the Gospel of Jesus Christ. 33

    Alexander Hamilton
    REVOLUTIONARY GENERAL; SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION;
    AUTHOR OF THE FEDERALIST PAPERS; SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY
    Following his duel with Aaron Burr, in those final twenty four hours while life still remained in him, Hamilton called for two ministers, the Rev. J. M. Mason and the Rev. Benjamin Moore, to pray with him and administer Communion to him. Each of those two ministers reported what transpired. The Rev. Mason recounted:
    [General Hamilton said] “I went to the field determined not to take his life.” He repeated his disavowal of all intention to hurt Mr. Burr; the anguish of his mind in recollecting what had passed; and his humble hope of forgiveness from his God. I recurred to the topic of the Divine compassion; the freedom of pardon in the Redeemer Jesus to perishing sinners. “That grace, my dear General, which brings salvation, is rich, rich” – “Yes,” interrupted he, “it is rich grace.” “And on that grace,” continued I, “a sinner has the highest encouragement to repose his confidence, because it is tendered to him upon the surest foundation; the Scrip¬ture testifying that we have redemption through the blood of Jesus, the forgiveness of sins according to the richness of His grace.” Here the General, letting go my hand, which he had held from the moment I sat down at his bed side, clasped his hands together, and, looking up towards Heaven, said, with emphasis, “I have a tender reliance on the mercy of the Al¬mighty, through the merits of the Lord Jesus Christ.” 34

    The Rev. Benjamin Moore reported:

    [I]mmediately after he was brought from [the field] . . . a mes¬sage was sent informing me of the sad event, accompanied by a request from General Hamilton that I would come to him for the purpose of administering the Holy Communion. I went. . . . I proceeded to converse with him on the subject of his receiving the Communion; and told him that with respect to the qualifications of those who wished to become partakers of that holy ordinance, my inquires could not be made in lan¬guage more expressive than that which was used by our [own] Church. – [I asked], “Do you sincerely repent of your sins past? Have you a lively faith in God’s mercy through Christ, with a thankful remembrance of the death of Christ? And are you disposed to live in love and charity with all men?” He lifted up his hands and said, “With the utmost sincerity of heart I can answer those questions in the affirmative – I have no ill will against Col. Burr. I met him with a fixed resolution to do him no harm – I forgive all that happened.” . . . The Communion was then administered, which he received with great devotion, and his heart afterwards appeared to be perfectly at rest. I saw him again this morning, when, with his last faltering words, he expressed a strong confidence in the mercy of God through the intercession of the Redeemer. I remained with him until 2 o’clock this afternoon, when death closed the awful scene – he expired without a struggle, and almost without a groan. By reflecting on this melancholy event, let the humble believer be encouraged ever to hold fast that precious faith which is the only source of true consolation in the last extremity of nature. [And l]et the infidel be persuaded to abandon his opposition to that Gospel which the strong, inquisitive, and comprehensive mind of a Hamilton embraced.35

    One other consequence of Hamilton’s untimely death was that it permanently halted the formation of a religious society Hamilton had proposed. Hamilton suggested that it be named the Christian Constitutional Society, and listed two goals for its formation: first, the support of the Christian religion; and second, the support of the Constitution of the United States. This or¬ganization was to have numerous clubs throughout each state which would meet regularly and work to elect to office those who reflected the goals of the Christian Constitutional Society. 36

    John Hancock
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS;
    REVOLUTIONARY GENERAL; GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS
    Sensible of the importance of Christian piety and virtue to the order and happiness of a state, I cannot but earnestly commend to you every measure for their support and encouragement.37
    He called on the entire state to pray “that universal happiness may be established in the world [and] that all may bow to the scepter of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the whole earth be filled with His glory.”38

    He also called on the State of Massachusetts to pray . . .

    that all nations may bow to the scepter of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and that the whole earth may be filled with his glory.39
    that the spiritual kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ may be continually increasing until the whole earth shall be filled with His glory.40
    to confess their sins and to implore forgiveness of God through the merits of the Savior of the World.41
    to cause the benign religion of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ to be known, understood, and practiced among all the inhabitants of the earth.42
    to confess their sins before God and implore His forgiveness through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior.43
    that He would finally overrule all events to the advancement of the Redeemer’s kingdom and the establishment of universal peace and good will among men.44
    that the kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ may be established in peace and righteousness among all the nations of the earth.45
    that with true contrition of heart we may confess our sins, resolve to forsake them, and implore the Divine forgiveness, through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, our Savior. . . . And finally to overrule all the commotions in the world to the spreading the true religion of our Lord Jesus Christ in its purity and power among all the people of the earth.46
    John Hart
    JUDGE; LEGISLATOR; SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION
    [T]hanks be given unto Almighty God therefore, and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die and after that the judgment [Hebrews 9:27] . . . principally, I give and recommend my soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it and my body to the earth to be buried in a decent and Christian like manner . . . to receive the same again at the general resurrection by the mighty power of God.47
    Patrick Henry
    REVOLUTIONARY GENERAL; LEGISLATOR; “THE VOICE OF LIBERTY”;
    RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION; GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA
    Being a Christian… is a character which I prize far above all this world has or can boast.48
    The Bible… is a book worth more than all the other books that were ever printed.49

    Righteousness alone can exalt [America] as a nation…Whoever thou art, remember this; and in thy sphere practice virtue thyself, and encourage it in others.50

    The great pillars of all government and of social life [are] virtue, morality, and religion. This is the armor, my friend, and this alone, that renders us invincible.51

    This is all the inheritance I can give to my dear family. The religion of Christ can give them one which will make them rich indeed.52

    Samuel Huntington
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS;
    JUDGE; GOVERNOR OF CONNECTICUT
    It becomes a people publicly to acknowledge the over-ruling hand of Divine Providence and their dependence upon the Supreme Being as their Creator and Merciful Preserver . . . and with becoming humility and sincere repentance to supplicate the pardon that we may obtain forgiveness through the merits and mediation of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.53
    James Iredell
    RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION; ATTORNEY GENERAL OF NORTH CAROLINA;
    U. S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE APPOINTED BY PRESIDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON
    For my part, I am free and ready enough to declare that I think the Christian religion is a Divine institution; and I pray to God that I may never forget the precepts of His religion or suffer the appearance of an inconsistency in my principles and practice.54
    John Jay
    PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS; DIPLOMAT; AUTHOR OF THE FEDERALIST PAPERS;
    ORIGINAL CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE U. S. SUPREME COURT; GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK
    Condescend, merciful Father! to grant as far as proper these imperfect petitions, to accept these inadequate thanksgivings, and to pardon whatever of sin hath mingled in them for the sake of Jesus Christ, our blessed Lord and Savior; unto Whom, with Thee, and the blessed Spirit, ever one God, be rendered all honor and glory, now and forever. 55
    Unto Him who is the author and giver of all good, I render sincere and humble thanks for His manifold and unmerited blessings, and especially for our redemption and salvation by His beloved Son. . . . Blessed be His holy name.56

    Mercy and grace and favor did come by Jesus Christ, and also that truth which verified the promises and predictions concerning Him and which exposed and corrected the various errors which had been imbibed respecting the Supreme Being, His attributes, laws, and dispensations.57

    By conveying the Bible to people . . . we certainly do them a most interesting act of kindness. We thereby enable them to learn that man was originally created and placed in a state of happiness, but, becoming disobedient, was subjected to the degradation and evils which he and his posterity have since experienced. The Bible will also inform them that our gracious Creator has provided for us a Redeemer in whom all the nations of the earth should be blessed – that this Redeemer has made atonement “for the sins of the whole world,” and thereby reconciling the Divine justice with the Divine mercy, has opened a way for our redemption and salvation; and that these inestimable benefits are of the free gift and grace of God, not of our deserving, nor in our power to deserve. The Bible will also [encourage] them with many explicit and consoling assurances of the Divine mercy to our fallen race, and with repeated invitations to accept the offers of pardon and reconciliation. . . . They, therefore, who enlist in His service, have the highest encouragement to fulfill the du¬ties assigned to their respective stations; for most certain it is, that those of His followers who [participate in] His conquests will also participate in the tran¬scendent glories and blessings of His Triumph.58

    I recommend a general and public return of praise and thanksgiving to Him from whose goodness these blessings descend. The most effectual means of securing the continuance of our civil and religious liberties is always to remember with reverence and gratitude the source from which they flow.59

    The Bible is the best of all books, for it is the word of God and teaches us the way to be happy in this world and in the next. Continue therefore to read it and to regulate your life by its precepts.60

    [T]he evidence of the truth of Christianity requires only to be carefully examined to produce conviction in candid minds… they who undertake that task will derive advantages.61

    Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers, and it is the duty as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian nation, to select and prefer Christians for their rulers.62

    Thomas Jefferson
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; DIPLOMAT; GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA; SECRETARY OF STATE; THIRD PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
    The doctrines of Jesus are simple, and tend all to the happiness of man.63
    The practice of morality being necessary for the well being of society, He [God] has taken care to impress its precepts so indelibly on our hearts that they shall not be effaced by the subtleties of our brain. We all agree in the obligation of the moral principles of Jesus and nowhere will they be found delivered in greater purity than in His discourses.64

    I am a Christian in the only sense in which He wished anyone to be: sincerely attached to His doctrines in preference to all others.65

    I am a real Christian – that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus Christ.66

    William Samuel Johnson
    JUDGE; MEMBER OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS; SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION;
    FRAMER OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS; PRESIDENT OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE; U. S. SENATOR
    [I] . . . am endeavoring . . . to attend to my own duty only as a Christian. . . . let us take care that our Christianity, though put to the test . . . be not shaken, and that our love for things really good wax not cold.67
    In an address to graduates:

    You this day. . . . have, by the favor of Providence and the at¬tention of friends, received a public education, the purpose whereof hath been to qualify you the better to serve your Creator and your country. You have this day invited this au¬dience to witness the progress you have made. . . . Thus you assume the character of scholars, of men, and of citizens. . . . Go, then, . . . and exercise them with diligence, fidelity, and zeal. . . . Your first great duties, you are sensible, are those you owe to Heaven, to your Creator and Redeemer. Let these be ever present to your minds, and exemplified in your lives and conduct. Imprint deep upon your minds the principles of piety towards God, and a reverence and fear of His holy name. The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom and its [practice] is everlasting [happiness] . . . . Reflect deeply and often upon [your] relations [with God]. Remember that it is in God you live and move and have your being, – that, in the language of David, He is about your bed and about your path and spieth out all your ways – that there is not a thought in your hearts, nor a word upon your tongues, but lo! He knoweth them altogether, and that He will one day call you to a strict account for all your conduct in this mortal life. Remember, too, that you are the redeemed of the Lord, that you are bought with a price, even the inestimable price of the precious blood of the Son of God. Adore Jehovah, therefore, as your God and your Judge. Love, fear, and serve Him as your Creator, Redeemer, and Sanctifier. Acquaint yourselves with Him in His word and holy ordinances. . . . [G]o forth into the world firmly resolved neither to be allured by its vanities nor contaminated by its vices, but to run with patience and perseverance, with firmness and [cheerfulness], the glorious career of religion, honor, and virtue. . . . Finally, . . . in the elegant and expressive language are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report, if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things” – and do them, and the God of peace shall be with you, to whose most gracious protection I now commend you, humbly imploring Almighty Goodness that He will be your guardian and your guide, your protector and the rock of your defense, your Savior and your God.68

    James Kent
    JUDGE; LAW PROFESSOR; “FATHER OF AMERICAN JURISPRUDENCE”
    My children, I wish to talk to you. During my early and middle life I was, perhaps, rather skeptical with regard to some of the truths of Christianity. Not that I did not have the utmost respect for religion and always read my Bible, but the doctrine of the atonement was one I never could understand, and I felt inclined to consider as impossible to be received in the way Divines taught it. I believe I was rather inclined to Unitarianism; but of late years my views have altered. I believe in the doctrines of the prayer books as I understand them, and hope to be saved through the merits of Jesus Christ. . . . My object in telling you this is that if anything happens to me, you might know, and perhaps it would console you to remember, that on this point my mind is clear: I rest my hopes of salvation on the Lord Jesus Christ.69
    Francis Scott Key
    U. S. ATTORNEY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA;
    AUTHOR OF THE “STAR SPANGLED BANNER”
    [M]ay I always hear that you are following the guidance of that blessed Spirit that will lead you into all truth, leaning on that Almighty arm that has been extended to deliver you, trusting only in the only Savior, and going on in your way to Him rejoicing.70
    James Madison’
    SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; AUTHOR OF THE FEDERALIST PAPERS; FRAMER OF THE
    BILL OF RIGHTS; SECRETARY OF STATE; FOURTH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
    A watchful eye must be kept on ourselves lest, while we are building ideal monuments of renown and bliss here, we neglect to have our names enrolled in the Annals of Heaven.71
    I have sometimes thought there could not be a stronger testimony in favor of religion or against temporal enjoyments, even the most rational and manly, than for men who occupy the most honorable and gainful departments and [who] are rising in reputation and wealth, publicly to declare their unsatisfactoriness by becoming fervent advocates in the cause of Christ; and I wish you may give in your evidence in this way.72

    James Manning
    MEMBER OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS; PRESIDENT OF BROWN UNIVERSITY
    I rejoice that the religion of Jesus prevails in your parts; I can tell you the same agreeable news from this quarter. Yesterday I returned from Piscataway in East Jersey, where was held a Baptist annual meeting (I think the largest I ever saw) but much more remarkable still for the Divine influences which God was pleased to grant. Fifteen were baptized; a number during the three days professed to experience a change of heart. Christians were remarkably quickened; multitudes appeared.73

    Henry Marchant
    MEMBER OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS; ATTORNEY GENERAL OF RHODE ISLAND; RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION; FEDERAL JUDGE APPOINTED BY PRESIDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON
    And may God grant that His grace may really affect your heart with suitable impressions of His goodness. Remember that God made you, that God keeps you alive and preserves you from all harm, and gives you all the powers and the capacity whereby you are able to read of Him and of Jesus Christ, your Savior and Redeemer, and to do every other needful business of life. And while you look around you and see the great privileges and advantages you have above what other children have (of learning to read and write, of being taught the meaning of the great truths of the Bible), you must remember not to be proud on that account but to bless God and be thankful and endeavor in your turn to assist others with the knowledge you may gain.74(to his daughter)

    George Mason
    DELEGATE AT THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION; “FATHER OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS”
    I give and bequeath my soul to Almighty God that gave it me, hoping that through the meritorious death and passion of our Savior and Redeemer Jesus Christ to receive absolution and remission for all my sins.75
    My soul I resign into the hands of my Almighty Creator, Whose tender mercies are all over His works. . humbly hoping from His unbounded mercy and benevolence, through the merits of my blessed Savior, a remission of my sins.76

    James McHenry
    REVOLUTIONARY OFFICER; SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION;
    SECRETARY OF WAR UNDER PRESIDENTS GEORGE WASHINGTON AND JOHN ADAMS
    [P]ublic utility pleads most forcibly for the general distribution of the Holy Scriptures. Without the Bible, in vain do we increase penal laws and draw entrenchments around our institutions.77
    Bibles are strong protections. Where they abound, men cannot pursue wicked courses and at the same time enjoy quiet conscience.78

    Thomas McKean
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS;
    RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION; CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF PENNSYLVANIA;
    GOVERNOR OF PENNSYLVANIA; GOVERNOR OF DELAWARE
    In the case Respublica v. John Roberts,79 John Roberts was sentenced to death after a jury found him guilty of treason. Chief Justice McKean then told him:
    You will probably have but a short time to live. Before you launch into eternity, it be¬hooves you to improve the time that may be allowed you in this world: it behooves you most seriously to reflect upon your past conduct; to repent of your evil deeds; to be incessant in prayers to the great and merciful God to forgive your manifold transgressions and sins; to teach you to rely upon the merit and passion of a dear Redeemer, and thereby to avoid those regions of sorrow – those doleful shades where peace and rest can never dwell, where even hope cannot enter. It behooves you to seek the [fellowship], advice, and prayers of pious and good men; to be [persistent] at the Throne of Grace, and to learn the way that leadeth to happiness. May you, reflecting upon these things, and pursuing the will of the great Father of light and life, be received into [the] company and society of angels and archangels and the spirits of just men made perfect; and may you be qualified to enter into the joys of Heaven – joys unspeakable and full of glory!80

    Gouverneur Morris
    REVOLUTIONARY OFFICER; MEMBER OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS;
    SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; “PENMAN OF THE CONSTITUTION”; DIPLOMAT; U. S. SENATOR
    There must be religion. When that ligament is torn, society is disjointed and its members perish… [T]he most important of all lessons is the denunciation of ruin to every state that rejects the precepts of religion.81
    Your good morals in the army give me sincere pleasure as it hath long been my fixed opinion that virtue and religion are the great sources of human happiness. More especially is it necessary in your profession firmly to rely upon the God of Battles for His guardianship and protection in the dreadful hour of trial. But of all these things you will and I hope in the merciful Lord.82

    Jedidiah Morse
    HISTORIAN OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION; EDUCATOR; “FATHER OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHY”;
    APPOINTED BY SECRETARY OF STATE TO DOCUMENT CONDITION OF INDIAN AFFAIRS
    To the kindly influence of Christianity we owe that degree of civil freedom and political and social happiness which mankind now enjoys. All efforts made to destroy the foundations of our Holy Religion ultimately tend to the subversion also of our political freedom and happiness. In proportion as the genuine effects of Christianity are diminished in any nation… in the same proportion will the people of that nation recede from the blessings of genuine freedom… Whenever the pillars of Christianity shall be overthrown, our present republican forms of government – and all the blessings which flow from them – must fall with them. 83
    John Morton
    LEGISLATOR; JUDGE; SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION
    With an awful reverence to the Great Almighty God, Creator of all mankind, being sick and weak in body but of sound mind and memory, thanks be given to Almighty God for the same.84
    James Otis
    LEADER OF THE SONS OF LIBERTY; ATTORNEY & JURIST;
    MENTOR OF JOHN HANCOCK AND SAMUEL ADAMS
    Has [government] any solid foundation? Any chief cornerstone?… I think it has an everlasting foundation in the unchangeable will of God… The sum of my argument is that civil government is of God.85
    Robert Treat Paine
    MILITARY CHAPLAIN; SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE;
    ATTORNEY GENERAL OF MASSACHUSETTS; JUDGE
    I desire to bless and praise the name of God most high for appointing me my birth in a land of Gospel Light where the glorious tidings of a Savior and of pardon and salvation through Him have been continually sounding in mine ears.86
    I am constrained to express my adoration of the Supreme Being, the Author of my existence, in full belief of His Providential goodness and His forgiving mercy revealed to the world through Jesus Christ, through whom I hope for never ending happiness in a future state.87

    I believe the Bible to be the written word of God and to contain in it the whole rule of faith and manners.88

    William Paterson
    ATTORNEY GENERAL OF NEW JERSEY; SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; U. S. SENATOR;
    GOVERNOR OF NEW JERSEY; U. S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE
    When the righteous rule, the people rejoice; when the wicked rule, the people groan. [invoking Proverbs 29:2 to instruct a grand jury].89
    Timothy Pickering
    REVOLUTIONARY GENERAL; JUDGE; RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION;
    POSTMASTER GENERAL UNDER PRESIDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON;
    SECRETARY OF WAR UNDER PRESIDENTS GEORGE WASHINGTON AND JOHN ADAMS;
    SECRETARY OF STATE UNDER PRESIDENT JOHN ADAMS
    Pardon, we beseech Thee, all our offences of omission and commission; and grant that in all our thoughts, words, and actions, we may conform to Thy known will manifested in our consciences and in the revelations of Jesus Christ, our Savior.90
    [W]e do not grieve as those who have no… resurrection to a life immortal. Here the believers in Christianity manifest their superior advantages, for life and immortality were brought to light by the gospel of Jesus Christ [II Timothy 1:10]. Prior to that revelation even the wisest and best of mankind were involved in doubt and they hoped, rather than believed, that the soul was immortal.91

    Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
    REVOLUTIONARY GENERAL; LEGISLATOR; SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; DIPLOMAT
    To the eternal and only true God be all honor and glory, now and forever. Amen!92
    John Randolph of Roanoke
    CONGRESSMAN UNDER PRESIDENTS JOHN ADAMS, THOMAS JEFFERSON, JAMES MADISON,
    JAMES MONROE, JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, ANDREW JACKSON; U. S. SENATOR; DIPLOMAT
    I have thrown myself, reeking with sin, on the mercy of God, through Jesus Christ His blessed Son and our (yes, my friend, our) precious Redeemer; and I have assurances as strong as that I now owe nothing to your rank that the debt is paid and now I love God – and with reason. I once hated him – and with reason, too, for I knew not Christ. The only cause why I should love God is His goodness and mercy to me through Christ.93
    I am at last reconciled to my God and have assurance of His pardon through faith in Christ, against which the very gates of hell cannot prevail. Fear hath been driven out by perfect love.94

    [I] have looked to the Lord Jesus Christ, and hope I have obtained pardon.95[I] still cling to the cross of my Redeemer, and with God’s aid firmly resolve to lead a life less unworthy of one who calls himself the humble follower of Jesus Christ.96

    Benjamin Rush
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; SURGEON GENERAL OF THE CONTINENTAL ARMY; RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION; “FATHER OF AMERICAN MEDICINE”;
    TREASURER OF THE U. S. MINT; “FATHER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS UNDER THE CONSTITUTION”
    The Gospel of Jesus Christ prescribes the wisest rules for just conduct in every situation of life. Happy they who are enabled to obey them in all situations! . . . My only hope of salvation is in the infinite tran¬scendent love of God manifested to the world by the death of His Son upon the Cross. Noth¬ing but His blood will wash away my sins [Acts 22:16]. I rely exclusively upon it. Come, Lord Jesus! Come quickly! [Revelation 22:20]97
    I do not believe that the Constitution was the offspring of inspiration, but I am as satisfied that it is as much the work of a Divine Providence as any of the miracles recorded in the Old and New Testament.98

    By renouncing the Bible, philosophers swing from their moorings upon all moral subjects… It is the only correct map of the human heart that ever has been published.99

    [T]he greatest discoveries in science have been made by Christian philosophers and . . . there is the most knowledge in those countries where there is the most Christianity.100[T]he only means of establishing and perpetuating our republican forms of government is the universal education of our youth in the principles of Christianity by means of the Bible.101

    The great enemy of the salvation of man, in my opinion, never invented a more effective means of limiting Christianity from the world than by persuading mankind that it was improper to read the Bible at schools.102

    [C]hristianity is the only true and perfect religion; and… in proportion as mankind adopt its principles and obey its precepts, they will be wise and happy.103

    The Bible contains more knowledge necessary to man in his present state than any other book in the world.104

    The Bible, when not read in schools, is seldom read in any subsequent period of life… [T]he Bible… should be read in our schools in preference to all other books because it contains the greatest portion of that kind of knowledge which is calculated to produce private and public happiness.105

    Roger Sherman
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION; SIGNER OF THE CONSTITUTION; “MASTER BUILDER OF THE CONSTITUTION”; JUDGE; FRAMER OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS; U. S. SENATOR
    I believe that there is one only liv¬ing and true God, existing in three persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, the same in substance, equal in power and glory. That the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are a revelation from God, and a complete rule to direct us how we may glorify and enjoy Him. . . . That He made man at first perfectly holy; that the first man sinned, and as he was the public head of his posterity, they all became sinners in consequence of his first transgression, are wholly indisposed to that which is good and inclined to evil, and on account of sin are liable to all the miseries of this life, to death, and to the pains of hell forever. I believe that God . . . did send His own Son to become man, die in the room and stead of sinners, and thus to lay a foundation for the offer of pardon and salvation to all mankind, so as all may be saved who are willing to accept the Gospel offer. . . . I believe a visible church to be a congregation of those who make a credible profession of their faith in Christ, and obedience to Him, joined by the bond of the covenant. . . . I believe that the sacraments of the New Testament are baptism and the Lord’s Supper. . . . I believe that the souls of believers are at their death made perfectly holy, and immediately taken to glory: that at the end of this world there will be a resurrection of the dead, and a final judgment of all mankind, when the righteous shall be publicly acquitted by Christ the Judge and admitted to everlasting life and glory, and the wicked be sentenced to everlasting punishment.106
    God commands all men everywhere to repent. He also commands them to believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and has assured us that all who do repent and believe shall be saved… [G]od… has absolutely promised to bestow them on all these who are willing to accept them on the terms of the Gospel – that is, in a way of free grace through the atonement. “Ask and ye shall receive [John 16:24]. Whosoever will, let him come and take of the waters of life freely [Revelation 22:17]. Him that cometh unto me I will in no wise cast out” [John 6:37].107

    [I]t is the duty of all to acknowledge that the Divine Law which requires us to love God with all our heart and our neighbor as ourselves, on pain of eternal damnation, is Holy, just, and good. . . . The revealed law of God is the rule of our duty.108

    True Christians are assured that no temptation (or trial) shall happen to them but what they shall be enabled to bear; and that the grace of Christ shall be sufficient for them.109

    “The volume which he consulted more than any other was the Bible. It was his custom, at the commencement of every session of Congress, to purchase a copy of the Scriptures, to peruse it daily, and to present it to one of his children on his return.”110

    Richard Stockton
    JUDGE; SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    [A]s my children will have frequent occasion of perusing this instrument, and may probably be particularly impressed with the last words of their father, I think it proper here not only to subscribe to the entire belief of the great and leading doctrines of the Christian religion, such as the being of God; the universal defection and depravity of human nature; the Divinity of the person and the completeness of the redemption purchased by the blessed Savior; the necessity of the operations of the Divine Spirit; of Divine faith accompanied with an habitual virtuous life; and the universality of the Divine Providence: but also, in the bowels of a father’s affection, to exhort and charge [my children] that the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom, that the way of life held up in the Christian system is calculated for the most complete happiness that can be enjoyed in this mortal state, [and] that all occasions of vice and immorality is injurious either immediately or consequentially – even in this life.111
    Thomas Stone
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE;
    SELECTED AS A DELEGATE TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION
    Shun all giddy, loose, and wicked company; they will corrupt and lead you into vice and bring you to ruin. Seek the company of sober, virtuous and good people… which will lead [you] to solid happiness.112
    Joseph Story
    U. S. CONGRESSMAN; “FATHER OF AMERICAN JURISPRUDENCE”;
    U. S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE APPOINTED BY PRESIDENT JAMES MADISON
    One of the beautiful boasts of our municipal jurisprudence is that Christianity is a part of the Common Law. There never has been a period in which the Common Law did not recognize Christianity as lying at its foundations.113
    I verily believe that Christianity is necessary to support a civil society and shall ever attend to its institutions and acknowledge its precepts as the pure and natural sources of private and social happiness.114

    Caleb Strong
    DELEGATE AT THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION TO FRAME THE U. S. CONSTITUTION;
    RATIFIER OF THE CONSTITUTION; U. S. SENATOR; GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS
    He called on the State of Massachusetts to pray that . . .
    all nations may know and be obedient to that grace and truth which came by Jesus Christ.115
    Zephaniah Swift
    U. S. CONGRESSMAN; DIPLOMAT; JUDGE; AUTHOR OF AMERICA’S FIRST LEGAL TEXT (1795)
    Jesus Christ has in the clearest manner inculcated those duties which are productive of the highest moral felicity and consistent with all the innocent enjoyments, to which we are impelled by the dictates of nature. Religion, when fairly considered in its genuine simplicity and uncorrupted state, is the source of endless rapture and delight.116
    Charles Thomson
    SECRETARY OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS;
    DESIGNER OF THE GREAT SEAL OF THE UNITED STATES; ALONG WITH JOHN HANCOCK,
    THOMSON WAS ONE OF ONLY TWO FOUNDERS TO SIGN THE INITIAL DRAFT OF
    THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE APPROVED BY CONGRESS
    I am a Christian. I believe only in the Scriptures, and in Jesus Christ my Savior.117
    Jonathan Trumbull
    JUDGE; LEGISLATOR; GOVERNOR OF CONNECTICUT;
    CONFIDANT OF GEORGE WASHINGTON AND CALLED “BROTHER JONATHAN” BY HIM
    The examples of holy men teach us that we should seek Him with fasting and prayer, with penitent confession of our sins, and hope in His mercy through Jesus Christ the Great Redeemer.118
    Principally and first of all, I bequeath my soul to God the Creator and giver thereof, and my body to the earth to be buried in a decent Christian burial, in firm belief that I shall receive the same again at the general resurrection through the power of Almighty God, and hope of eternal life and happiness through the merits of my dear Redeemer Jesus Christ.119

    He called on the State of Connecticut to pray that . . .

    God would graciously pour out His Spirit upon us and make the blessed Gospel in His hand effectual to a thorough reformation and general revival of the holy and peaceful religion of Jesus Christ.120

    https://wallbuilders.com/founding-fathers-jesus-christianity-bible/

  666. Bitterlaw says:

    MG – Zzzzzzzzzzz. The Founding Fathers were men, not deities. They did the best they could. Many owned slaves. Most hated Catholics.

    I know the Judeo- Christian basis for our legal system. However, voting based on claiming to know God’s will is folly at best and dangerous at worst.

  667. MichiganGuy says:

    George Washington
    JUDGE; MEMBER OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS;
    COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE CONTINENTAL ARMY;
    PRESIDENT OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION;
    FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES; “FATHER OF HIS COUNTRY”
    You do well to wish to learn our arts and ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ. These will make you a greater and happier people than you are.121
    While we are zealously performing the duties of good citizens and soldiers, we certainly ought not to be inattentive to the higher duties of religion. To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest glory to add the more distinguished character of Christian.122

    The blessing and protection of Heaven are at all times necessary but especially so in times of public distress and danger. The General hopes and trusts that every officer and man will endeavor to live and act as becomes a Christian soldier, defending the dearest rights and liberties of his country.123

    I now make it my earnest prayer that God would… most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility, and pacific temper of the mind which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion.124

    Daniel Webster
    U. S. SENATOR; SECRETARY OF STATE; “DEFENDER OF THE CONSTITUTION”
    [T]he Christian religion – its general principles – must ever be regarded among us as the foundation of civil society.125
    Whatever makes men good Christians, makes them good citizens.126

    [T]o the free and universal reading of the Bible… men [are] much indebted for right views of civil liberty.127

    The Bible is a book… which teaches man his own individual responsibility, his own dignity, and his equality with his fellow man.128

    Noah Webster
    REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER; JUDGE; LEGISLATOR; EDUCATOR; “SCHOOLMASTER TO AMERICA”
    [T]he religion which has introduced civil liberty is the religion of Christ and His apostles… This is genuine Christianity and to this we owe our free constitutions of government.129
    The moral principles and precepts found in the Scriptures ought to form the basis of all our civil constitutions and laws.130

    All the… evils which men suffer from vice, crime, ambition, injustice, oppression, slavery and war, proceed from their despising or neglecting the precepts contained in the Bible.131

    [O]ur citizens should early understand that the genuine source of correct republican principles is the Bible, particularly the New Testament, or the Christian religion.132[T]he Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children under a free government ought to be instructed. No truth is more evident than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.133

    The Bible is the chief moral cause of all that is good and the best corrector of all that is evil in human society – the best book for regulating the temporal concerns of men.134

    [T]he Christian religion… is the basis, or rather the source, of all genuine freedom in government… I am persuaded that no civil government of a republican form can exist and be durable in which the principles of Christianity have not a controlling influence.135

    John Witherspoon
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; RATIFIER OF THE U. S. CONSTITUTION; PRESIDENT OF PRINCETON
    [C]hrist Jesus – the promise of old made unto the fathers, the hope of Israel [Acts 28:20], the light of the world [John 8:12], and the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth [Romans 10:4] – is the only Savior of sinners, in opposition to all false religions and every uninstituted rite; as He Himself says (John 14:6): “I am the way, and the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father but by Me.”136[N]o man, whatever be his character or whatever be his hope, shall enter into rest unless he be reconciled to God though Jesus Christ.137[T]here is no salvation in any other than in Jesus Christ of Nazareth.138
    I shall now conclude my discourse by preaching this Savior to all who hear me, and entreating you in the most earnest manner to believe in Jesus Christ; for “there is no salvation in any other” [Acts 4:12].139

    It is very evident that both the prophets in the Old Testament and the apostles in the New are at great pains to give us a view of the glory and dignity of the person of Christ. With what magnificent titles is He adorned! What glorious attributes are ascribed to him!… All these conspire to teach us that He is truly and properly God – God over all, blessed forever!140

    [I]f you are not rec¬onciled to God through Jesus Christ – if you are not clothed with the spotless robe of His righteousness – you must forever perish.141[H]e is the best friend to American liberty who is the most sincere and active in promoting true and undefiled religion, and who sets himself with the greatest firmness to bear down profanity and immorality of every kind. Whoever is an avowed enemy of God, I scruple not to call him an enemy to his country.142

    Oliver Wolcott
    SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE; MILITARY GENERAL;
    GOVERNOR OF CONNECTICUT
    Through various scenes of life, God has sustained me. May He ever be my unfailing friend; may His love cherish my soul; may my heart with gratitude acknowledge His goodness; and may my desires be to Him and to the remembrance of His name….May we then turn our eyes to the bright objects above, and may God give us strength to travel the upward road. May the Divine Redeemer conduct us to that seat of bliss which He himself has prepared for His friends; at the approach of which every sorrow shall vanish from the human heart and endless scenes of glory open upon the enraptured eye. There our love to God and each other will grow stronger, and our pleasures never be dampened by the fear of future separation. How indifferent will it then be to us whether we obtained felicity by travailing the thorny or the agreeable paths of life – whether we arrived at our rest by passing through the envied and unfragrant road of greatness or sustained hardship and unmerited reproach in our journey. God’s Providence and support through the perilous perplexing labyrinths of human life will then forever excite our astonishment and love. May a happiness be granted to those I most tenderly love, which shall continue and increase through an endless existence. Your cares and burdens must be many and great, but put your trust in that God Who has hitherto supported you and me; He will not fail to take care of those who put their trust in Him….It is most evident that this land is under the protection of the Almighty, and that we shall be saved not by our wisdom nor by our might, but by the Lord of Host Who is wonderful in counsel and Almighty in all His operations.143

    Endnotes

    1.Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (Washington D. C.: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), Vol. XIII, p. 292-294. In a letter from John Adams to Thomas Jefferson on June 28, 1813.

    2. John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States, Charles Francis Adams, editor (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1856), Vol. X, p. 254, to Thomas Jefferson on April 19, 1817.

    3. John Adams, Works, Vol. III, p. 421, diary entry for July 26, 1796.

    4. John Adams, Works, Vol. II, pp. 6-7, diary entry for February 22, 1756.

    5. John Adams, Works, Vol. X, p. 85, to Thomas Jefferson on December 25, 1813.

    6. John Adams and John Quincy Adams, The Selected Writings of John and John Quincy Adams, Adrienne Koch and William Peden, editors (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1946), p. 292, John Quincy Adams to John Adams, January 3, 1817.

    7. Life of John Quincy Adams, W. H. Seward, editor (Auburn, NY: Derby, Miller & Company, 1849), p. 248.

    8. John Quincy Adams, An Oration Delivered Before the Inhabitants of the Town of Newburyport at Their Request on the Sixty-First Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1837 (Newburyport: Charles Whipple, 1837), pp. 5-6.

    9. From the Last Will & Testament of Samuel Adams, attested December 29, 1790; see also Samuel Adams, Life & Public Services of Samuel Adams, William V. Wells, editor (Boston: Little, Brown & Co, 1865), Vol. III, p. 379, Last Will and Testament of Samuel Adams.

    10. Letters of Delegates to Congress: August 16, 1776-December 31, 1776, Paul H. Smith, editor (Washington DC: Library of Congress, 1979), Vol. 5, pp. 669-670, Samuel Adams to Elizabeth Adams on December 26, 1776.

    11. From a Fast Day Proclamation issued by Governor Samuel Adams, Massachusetts, March 20, 1797, in our possession; see also Samuel Adams, The Writings of Samuel Adams, Harry Alonzo Cushing, editor (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1908), Vol. IV, p. 407, from his proclamation of March 20, 1797.

    12. Samuel Adams, A Proclamation For a Day of Public Fasting, Humiliation and Prayer, given as the Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, from an original broadside in our possession; see also, Samuel Adams, The Writings of Samuel Adams, Harry Alonzo Cushing, editor (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1908), Vol. IV, p. 385, October 14, 1795.

    13. Samuel Adams, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 10, 1793.

    14. Samuel Adams, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 15, 1796.

    15. Josiah Bartlett, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 17, 1792.

    16. Gunning Bedford, Funeral Oration Upon the Death of General George Washington (Wilmington: James Wilson, 1800), p. 18, Evans #36922.

    17. Elias Boudinot, The Life, Public Services, Addresses, and Letters of Elias Boudinot, J. J. Boudinot, editor (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1896), Vol. I, pp. 19, 21, speech in the First Provincial Congress of New Jersey.

    18. Elias Boudinot, The Age of Revelation (Philadelphia: Asbury Dickins, 1801), pp. xii-xiv, from the prefatory remarks to his daughter, Susan, on October 30, 1782; see also Letters of the Delegates to Congress: 1774-1789, Paul H. Smith, editor (Washington, D. C.: Library of Congress, 1992), Vol. XIX, p. 325, from a letter of Elias Boudinot to his daughter, Susan Boudinot, on October 30, 1782; see also, Elias Boudinot, The Life Public Services, Addresses, and Letters of Elias Boudinot (Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin, and Company, 1896), Vol. I, p. 260-262.

    19. Elias Boudinot, The Age of Revelation, or the Age of Reason Shewn to be An Age of Infidelity (Philadelphia: Asbury Dickins, 1801), p. xv, from his “Dedication: Letter to his daughter Susan Bradford.”

    20. Jacob Broom to his son, James, on February 24, 1794, written from Wilmington, Delaware, from an original letter in our possession.

    21. From an autograph letter in our possession written by Charles Carroll to Charles W. Wharton, Esq., September 27, 1825.

    22. Lewis A. Leonard, Life of Charles Carroll of Carrollton (New York: Moffit, Yard & Co, 1918), pp. 256-257.

    23. Kate Mason Rowland, Life of Charles Carroll of Carrollton (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1890), Vol. II, pp. 373-374, will of Charles Carroll, Dec. 1, 1718 (later replaced by a subsequent will not containing this phrase, although he reexpressed this sentiment on several subsequent occasions, including repeatedly in the latter years of his life).

    24. Journal of the House of the Representatives of the United States of America (Washington, DC: Cornelius Wendell, 1855), 34th Cong., 1st Sess., p. 354, January 23, 1856; see also: Lorenzo D. Johnson, Chaplains of the General Government With Objections to their Employment Considered (New York: Sheldon, Blakeman & Co., 1856), p. 35, quoting from the House Journal, Wednesday, January 23, 1856, and B. F. Morris, The Christian Life and Character of the Civil Institutions of the United States (Philadelphia: George W. Childs, 1864), p. 328.

    25. Reports of Committees of the House of Representatives Made During the First Session of the Thirty-Third Congress (Washington: A. O. P. Nicholson, 1854), pp. 6-9.

    26. From the Last Will & Testament of John Dickinson, attested March 25, 1808.

    27. John Dickinson, The Political Writings of John Dickinson (Wilmington: Bonsal and Niles, 1801), Vol. I, pp. 111-112.

    28. From his last will and testament, attested on September 21, 1840.

    29. Benjamin Franklin, Works of Benjamin Franklin, John Bigelow, editor (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1904), p. 185, to Ezra Stiles, March 9, 1790.

    30. Benjamin Franklin, Works of the Late Doctor Benjamin Franklin (Dublin: P. Wogan, P. Byrne, J. More, and W. Janes, 1793), p. 149.

    31. Elbridge Gerry, Proclamation for a Day of Thanksgiving and Praise, October 24, 1810, from a proclamation in our possession, EAI #20675.

    32. Elbridge Gerry, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 13, 1811, from a proclamation in our possession, Shaw #23317.

    33. Elbridge Gerry, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 6, 1812, from a proclamation in our possession, Shaw #26003.

    34. John M. Mason, A Collection of the Facts and Documents Relative to the Death of Major General Alexander Hamilton (New York: Hopkins and Seymour, 1804), p. 53.

    35. John M. Mason, A Collection of the Facts and Documents Relative to the Death of Major General Alexander Hamilton (New York: Hopkins and Seymour, 1804), pp. 48-50.

    36. Alexander Hamilton, The Works of Alexander Hamilton, John C. Hamilton, editor (New York: John F. Trow, 1851), Vol. VI, p. 542, to James A. Bayard, April, 1802; see also, Alexander Hamilton, The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, Harold C. Syrett, editor (New York: Columbia University Press, 1977), Vol. XXV, p. 606, to James A. Bayard, April 16, 1802.

    37. Independent Chronicle (Boston), November 2, 1780, last page; see also Abram English Brown, John Hancock, His Book (Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1898), p. 269.

    38. John Hancock, A Proclamation For a Day of Public Thanksgiving 1791, given as Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, from an original broadside in our possession.

    39. John Hancock, Proclamation for a Day of Public Thanksgiving, October 28, 1784, from a proclamation in our possession, Evans #18593.

    40. John Hancock, Proclamation for a Day of Public Thanksgiving, October 29, 1788, from a proclamation in our possession, Evans #21237.

    41. John Hancock, Proclamation For a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 16, 1789, from a proclamation in our possession, Evans #21946.

    42. John Hancock, Proclamation for a Day of Thanksgiving and Praise, September 16, 1790, from an original broadside in our possession.

    43. John Hancock, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, February 11, 1791, from a proclamation in our possession, Evans #23549.

    44. John Hancock, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting, Prayer and Humiliation, February 24, 1792, from a proclamation in our possession, Evans #24519.

    45. John Hancock, Proclamation for a Day of Public Thanksgiving, October 25, 1792, from an original broadside in our possession.

    46. John Hancock, Proclamation for Day of Public Fasting, Humiliation and Prayer, March 4, 1793, from a broadside in our possession.

    47. From his last will and testament, attested April 16, 1779.

    48. A. G. Arnold, The Life of Patrick Henry of Virginia (Auburn and Buffalo: Miller, Orton and Mulligan, 1854), p. 250.

    49. William Wirt, Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry (Philadelphia: James Webster, 1818), p. 402; see also George Morgan, Patrick Henry (Philadelphia & London: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1929), p. 403.

    50. Patrick Henry, Patrick Henry: Life, Correspondence and Speeches, William Wirt Henry, editor (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1891), Vol. II, p. 632, addendum to his resolutions against the Stamp Act, May 29, 1765.

    51. Patrick Henry, Patrick Henry: Life, Correspondence and Speeches, William Wirt Henry, editor (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1891), Vol. II, p. 592, to Archibald Blair on January 8, 1799.

    52. Will of Patrick Henry, attested November 20, 1798.

    53. Samuel Huntington, A Proclamation for a Day of Fasting, Prayer and Humiliation, March 9, 1791, from a proclamation in our possession, Evans #23284.

    54. James Iredell, The Papers of James Iredell, Don Higginbotham, editor (Raleigh: North Carolina Division of Archives and History, 1976), Vol. I, p. 11 from his 1768 essay on religion.

    55. William Jay, The Life of John Jay (New York: J & J Harper, 1833), Vol. I p. 518, Appendix V, from a prayer found among Mr. Jay’s papers and in his handwriting.

    56. William Jay, The Life of John Jay (New York: J. & J. Harper, 1833), Vol. I, pp. 519-520, from his Last Will & Testament.

    57. William Jay, The Life of John Jay (New York: J & J Harper, 1833), Vol. II, p. 386, to John Murray, April 15, 1818.

    58. John Jay, The Correspondence and Public Papers of John Jay, 1794-1826, Henry P. Johnston, editor (New York: Burt Franklin, 1890), Vol. IV, pp. 494, 498, from his “Address at the Annual Meeting of the American Bible Society,” May 13, 1824.

    59. William Jay, The Life of John Jay (New York: J. & J. Harper, 1833), Vol. I, pp. 457-458, to the Committee of the Corporation of the City of New York on June 29, 1826.

    60. John Jay, John Jay: The Winning of the Peace. Unpublished Papers 1780-1784, Richard B. Morris, editor (New York: Harper & Row Publishers, 1980), Vol. II, p. 709, to Peter Augustus Jay on April 8, 1784.

    61. William Jay, The Life of John Jay (New York: J. & J. Harper, 1833), Vol. II, p. 266, to the Rev. Uzal Ogden on February 14, 1796.

    62. William Jay, The Life of John Jay (New York: J. & J. Harper, 1833), Vol. II, p. 376, to John Murray Jr. on October 12, 1816.

    63. Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Albert Bergh, editor (Washington, D. C.: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Assoc., 1904), Vol. XV, p. 383, to Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse on June 26, 1822.

    64. Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Alberty Ellery Bergh, editor (Washington D.C.: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), Vol. XII, p. 315, to James Fishback, September 27, 1809.

    65. Thomas Jefferson, Memoir, Correspondence, and Miscellanies from the Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson Randolph, editor (Boston: Grey & Bowen, 1830), Vol. III, p. 506, to Benjamin Rush, April 21, 1803.

    66. Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Albert Ellery Bergh, editor (Washington, D.C.: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), Vol. XIV, p. 385, to Charles Thomson on January 9, 1816.

    67. Edwards Beardsley, Life and Times of William Samuel Johnson (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1886), p. 184.

    68. E. Edwards Beardsley, Life and Times of William Samuel Johnson (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1886), pp. 141-145.

    69. William Kent, Memoirs and Letters of James Kent, (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1898), pp. 276-277.

    70. Hugh A. Garland, The Life of John Randolph of Roanoke (New York: D. Appleton & Company, 1853), Vol. II, p. 104, from Francis Scott Key to John Randolph.

    71. James Madison, Letters and Other Writings of James Madison (New York: R. Worthington, 1884), Vol. I, pp. 5-6, to William Bradford on November 9, 1772.

    72. James Madison, The Papers of James Madison, William T. Hutchinson, editor (Illinois: University of Chicago Press, 1962), Vol. I, p. 96, to William Bradford on September 25, 1773.

    73. Letters of Delegates to Congress: November 7, 1785-November 5, 1786, Paul H. Smith, editor (Washington DC: Library of Congress, 1995), Vol. 23, p. 337, James Manning to Robert Carter on June 7, 1786.

    74. Letters of Delegates to Congress: May 1, 1777 – September 18, 1777, Paul H. Smith, editor (Washington DC: Library of Congress, 1981), Vol. 7, pp. 645-646, Henry Marchant to Sarah Marchant on September 9, 1777.

    75. Kate Mason Rowland, Life of George Mason (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1892), Vol. I, p. 373, Will of Colonel George Mason, June 29, 1715 (this will was later replaced by the will below.)

    76. Will of George Mason, attested March 20, 1773.

    77. Bernard C. Steiner, One Hundred and Ten Years of Bible Society Work in Maryland, 1810-1920 (Maryland Bible Society, 1921), p. 14.

    78. Bernard C. Steiner, One Hundred and Ten Years of Bible Society Work in Maryland, 1810-1920 (Maryland Bible Society, 1921), p. 14.

    79. A. J. Dallas, Reports of Cases Ruled and Adjudged in the Courts of Pennsylvania (Phila¬delphia: P. Byrne, 1806), p. 39, Respublica v. John Roberts, Pa. Sup. Ct. 1778.

    80. William B. Reed, Life and Correspondence of Joseph Reed (Philadelphia: Lindsay and Blakiston, 1847), Vol. II, pp. 36-37.

    81. Collections of the New York Historical Society for the Year 1821 (New York: E. Bliss and E. White, 1821), pp. 32, 34, from “An Inaugural Discourse Delivered Before the New York Historical Society by the Honorable Gouverneur Morris, (President,) 4th September, 1816.”

  668. MichiganGuy says:

    82. Letters of Delegates to Congress: February 1, 1778-May 31, 1778, Paul H. Smith, editor (Washington DC: Library of Congress, 1982), Vol. 9, pp. 729-730, Gouverneur Morris to General Anthony Wayne on May 21, 1778.

    83. Jedidiah Morse, A Sermon, Exhibiting the Present Dangers and Consequent Duties of the Citizens of the United States of America, Delivered at Charlestown, April 25, 1799, The Day of the National Fast (MA: Printed by Samuel Etheridge, 1799), p. 9.

    84. From his last will and testament, attested January 28, 1777.

    85. James Otis, The Rights of the British Colonies Asserted and Proved (London: J. Williams and J. Almon, 1766), pp. 11, 98.

    86. Robert Treat Paine, The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, Stephen T. Riley and Edward W. Hanson, editors (Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1992), Vol. I, p. 48, Robert Treat Paine’s Confession of Faith, 1749.

    87. From the Last Will & Testament of Robert Treat Paine, attested May 11, 1814.

    88. Robert Treat Paine, The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, Stephen T. Riley and Edward W. Hanson, editors (Boston: Massachusetts Historical Society, 1992), Vol. I, p. 49, Robert Treat Paine’s Confession of Faith, 1749.

    89. United States Oracle (Portsmouth, NH), May 24, 1800.

    90. Charles W. Upham, The Life of Timothy Pickering (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1873), Vol. IV, p. 390, from his prayer of November 30, 1828.

    91. Mary Orne Pickering, Life of John Pickering (Boston: 1887), p. 79, letter from Thomas Pickering to his son John Pickering, May 12, 1796.

    92. From his last will and testament, attested October 8, 1807.

    93. Collected Letters of John Randolph of Roanoke to Dr. John Brockenbrough, Kenneth Shorey, editor (New Brunswick: Transaction Books, 1988), p. 17, to John Brockenbrough, August 25, 1818.

    94. Hugh A. Garland, The Life of John Randolph of Roanoke (New York: D. Appleton & Company, 1853), Vol. II, p. 99, to Francis Scott Key on September 7, 1818.

    95. Hugh A. Garland, The Life of John Randolph of Roanoke (New York: D. Appleton & Company, 1853), Vol. 1I, p. 374.

    96. Hugh A. Garland, The Life of John Randolph of Roanoke (New York: D. Appleton & Company, 1853), Vol. II, p. 106, to Francis Scott Key, May 3, 1819.

    97. Benjamin Rush, The Autobiography of Benjamin Rush, George W. Corner, editor (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1948), pp. 165-166.

    98. Benjamin Rush, Letters of Benjamin Rush, L. H. Butterfield, editor (Princeton, New Jersey: American Philosophical Society, 1951), Vol. I, p. 475, to Elias Boudinot on July 9, 1788.

    99. Benjamin Rush, Letters of Benjamin Rush, L. H. Butterfield, editor (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1951), Vol. II, p. 936, to John Adams, January 23, 1807.

    100. Benjamin Rush, Essays, Literary, Moral and Philosophical (Philadelphia: Thomas and William Bradford, 1806), p. 84, Thoughts upon Female Education.”

    101. Benjamin Rush, Essays, Literary, Moral & Philosophical (Philadelphia: Thomas & Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), p. 112, “A Defence of the Use of the Bible as a School Book.”

    102. Benjamin Rush, Letters of Benjamin Rush, L. H. Butterfield, editor (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1951), Vol. I, p. 521, to Jeremy Belknap on July 13, 1789.

    103. Benjamin Rush, Essays, Literary, Moral & Philosophical (Philadelphia: Thomas & Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), p. 93, “A Defence of the Use of the Bible as a School Book.” See also Rush, Letters, Vol. I, p. 578, to Jeremy Belknap on March 2, 1791.

    104. Benjamin Rush, Essays, Literary, Moral & Philosophical (Philadelphia: Thomas & Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), p. 93, “A Defence of the Use of the Bible as a School Book;” see also Rush, Letters, Vol. I, p. 578, to Jeremy Belknap on March 2, 1791.

    105. Benjamin Rush, Essays, Literary, Moral & Philosophical (Philadelphia: Thomas & Samuel F. Bradford, 1798), pp. 94, 100, “A Defence of the Use of the Bible as a School Book.”

    106. Lewis Henry Boutell, The Life of Roger Sherman (Chicago: A. C. McClurg and Company, 1896), pp. 271-273.

    107. Correspondence Between Roger Sherman and Samuel Hopkins (Worcester, MA: Charles Hamilton, 1889), p. 9, from Roger Sherman to Samuel Hopkins, June 28, 1790.

    108. Correspondence Between Roger Sherman and Samuel Hopkins (Worcester, MA: Charles Hamilton, 1889), p. 10, from Roger Sherman to Samuel Hopkins, June 28, 1790.

    109. Correspondence Between Roger Sherman and Samuel Hopkins (Worcester, MA: Charles Hamilton, 1889), p. 26, from Roger Sherman to Samuel Hopkins, October, 1790.

    110. The Globe (Washington DC newspaper), August 15, 1837, p. 1.

    111. Will of Richard Stockton, dated May 20, 1780.

    112. John Sanderson, Biography of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence (Philadelphia: R. W. Pomeroy, 1824), Vol. IX, p. 333, Thomas Stone to his son, October 1787.

    113. Joseph Story, Life and Letters of Joseph Story, William W. Story, editor (Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1851), Vol. II, p. 8.

    114. Joseph Story, Life and Letters of Joseph Story, William W. Story, editor (Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1851), Vol. I, p. 92, March 24, 1801.

    115. Caleb Strong, Governor of Massachusetts, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting, Prayer and Humiliation, February 13, 1813, from a proclamation in our possession, Shaw #29090.

    116. Zephaniah Swift, The Correspondent (Windham: John Byrne, 1793), p. 135.

    117. The Autobiography of Benjamin Rush; His “Travels Through Life” together with his Commonplace Book for 1789-1813, George W. Carter, editor (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1948), p. 294, October 2, 1810.

    118. Jonathan Trumbull, Proclamation for a Day of Fasting and Prayer, March 9, 1774, from a proclamation in our possession, Evans #13210.

    119. Last will and testament of Jonathan Trumbull, Sr., attested on January 29, 1785.

    120. Jonathan Trumbull, Governor of Connecticut, A Proclamation for a Day of Public Thanksgiving, October 12, 1770, from a proclamation in our possession.

    121. George Washington, The Writings of Washington, John C. Fitzpatrick, editor (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1932), Vol. XV, p. 55, from his speech to the Delaware Indian Chiefs on May 12, 1779.

    122. George Washington, The Writings of Washington, John C. Fitzpatrick, editor (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1932), Vol. XI, pp. 342-343, General Orders of May 2, 1778.

    123. George Washington, The Writings of George Washington, John C. Fitzpatrick, editor (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1932), Vol. 5, p. 245, July 9, 1776 Order.

    124. George Washington, The Last Official Address of His Excellency George Washington to the Legislature of the United States (Hartford: Hudson and Goodwin, 1783), p. 12; see also The New Annual Register or General Repository of History, Politics, and Literature, for the Year 1783 (London: G. Robinson, 1784), p. 150.

    125. Daniel Webster, Mr. Webster’s Speech in Defence of the Christian Ministry and in Favor of the Religious Instruction of the Young. Delivered in the Supreme Court of the United States, February 10, 1844, in the Case of Stephen Girard’s Will (Washington: Printed by Gales and Seaton, 1844), p. 41.

    126. Daniel Webster, The Works of Daniel Webster (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1853), Vol. I, p. 44, A Discourse Delivered at Plymouth, on December 22, 1820.

    127. Daniel Webster, Address Delivered at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1843, on the Completion of the Monument (Boston: T. R. Marvin, 1843), p. 31; see also W. P. Strickland, History of the American Bible Society from its Organization to the Present Time (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1849), p.

    128. Daniel Webster, Address Delivered at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1843, on the Completion of the Monument (Boston: T. R. Marvin, 1843), p. 31; see also W. P. Strickland, History of the American Bible Society from its Organization to the Present Time (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1849), p.

    129. Noah Webster, History of the United States (New Haven: Durrie and Peck, 1832), p. 300, ¶ 578.

    130. Noah Webster, History of the United States (New Haven: Durrie & Peck, 1832), p. 339, “Advice to the Young,” ¶ 53.

    131. Noah Webster, History of the United States (New Haven: Durrie & Peck, 1832), p. 339, “Advice to the Young,” ¶ 53.

    132. Noah Webster, History of the United States (New Haven: Durrie and Peck, 1832), p. 6.

    133. Noah Webster, A Collection of Papers on Political, Literary, and Moral Subjects (New York: Webster and Clark, 1843), p. 291, from his “Reply to a Letter of David McClure on the Subject of the Proper Course of Study in the Girard College, Philadelphia. New Haven, October 25, 1836.”

    134. Noah Webster, The Holy Bible . . . With Amendments of the Language (New Haven: Durrie & Peck, 1833), p. v.

    135. K. Alan Snyder, Defining Noah Webster: Mind and Morals in the Early Republic (New York: University Press of America, 1990), p. 253, to James Madison on October 16, 1829.

    136. John Witherspoon, The Works of John Witherspoon (Edinburgh: J. Ogle, 1815), Vol. V, p. 255, Sermon 15, “The Absolute Necessity of Salvation Through Christ,” January 2, 1758.

    137. John Witherspoon, The Works of John Witherspoon (Edinburgh: J. Ogle, 1815), Vol. V, p. 245, Sermon 15, “The Absolute Necessity of Salvation Through Christ,” January 2, 1758.

    138. John Witherspoon, The Works of John Witherspoon (Edinburgh: J. Ogle, 1815), Vol. V, p. 248, Sermon 15, “The Absolute Necessity of Salvation Through Christ,” January 2, 1758.

    139. John Witherspoon, The Works of John Witherspoon (Edinburgh: J. Ogle, 1815), Vol. V, p. 276, Sermon 15, “The Absolute Necessity of Salvation Through Christ’ January 2, 1758.

    140. John Witherspoon, The Works of John Witherspoon (Edinburgh: J. Ogle, 1815), Vol. V, p. 267, Sermon 15, “The Absolute Necessity of Salvation Through Christ,” January 2, 1758.

    141. John Witherspoon, The Works of John Witherspoon (Edinburgh: J. Ogle, 1815), Vol. V, p. 278, Sermon 15, “The Absolute Necessity of Salvation Through Christ,” January 2, 1758.

    142. John Witherspoon, The Works of the Reverend John Witherspoon (Philadelphia: William W. Woodward, 1802), Vol. III, p. 42.

    143. Letters of Delegates to Congress: January 1, 1776-May 15, 1776, Paul H. Smith, editor (Washington DC: Library of Congress, 1978), Vol. 3, pp. 502-503, Oliver Wolcott to Laura Wolcott on April 10, 1776.

    https://wallbuilders.com/founding-fathers-jesus-christianity-bible/

  669. MichiganGuy says:

    Learn your history Bitter!

  670. Tina says:

    Bl, ma redux, with a good candidate we win it.

    But Imagree worse because we go down to 51and have a history of no cohesion, Meaning 1-4seem to always go off reservation.

  671. Bitterlaw says:

    Zzzzzzzzz. Tell me why I should be bound by your view of God’s law rather than somebody else’s view of God’s law. You see no danger in that?

  672. Bitterlaw says:

    I know the history, MG. I also know that people like you burned my ancestors’ churches in Philadelphia.

  673. Tina says:

    Sheeple these are all leaks from the Ig and separate doj investigations. The leaks did not come from mjlehead, who is corrupted.

    The concerns are that there are grounds for tossing the pleas or indictments.

    There are also potential hatch act violations, which are grounds for immediate termination.

    Did they use gubment property or resources to exchange those emails.

    Obviousky with the demotions, Ig found simething of a serious matter, whatever that matter is, we will find out.

  674. Bitterlaw says:

    God never disappoints me. We have an understanding. I never ask for anything because I am not important enough to deserve intercession. God never gives me anything because he agrees with my unimportance.

  675. Tina says:

    Sheeple, check this out

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2017/12/stray-strzok-thoughts.php

    In petes case he and his lovers personal emails were seized.

    I g found something very alarming

    10. None of the stories pause to ask why the Inspector General have sought Strzok’s text messages in the first place. What is going on here? As the Times notes, FBI regulations allow an agent to express his opinions “as an individual privately and publicly on political subjects and candidates.”

    11. A law enforcement source writes to observe that the Inspector General would not be able to access the private text message communications of an FBI official as senior and prominent as Strzok unless he had good cause to do s

  676. Tina says:

    Mccabe, opposite issue, he used an fbi email, so gubment property, to tell somebody to check out his wifes campaign. That is a Hatch Act violation. For a reg. Gubment employee, immediate termination. No appeal rights.

  677. Tina says:

    “The January 2017 statement issued by the Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General (OIG) announcing its review of allegations regarding various actions of the Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation in advance of the 2016 election stated that the OIG review would, among other things, consider whether certain underlying investigative decisions were based on improper considerations and that we also would include issues that might arise during the course of the review.

    The OIG has been reviewing allegations involving communications between certain individuals, and will report its findings regarding those allegations promptly upon completion of the review of them.”

    This is the ig review scope.

  678. Tina says:

    https://oig.justice.gov/press/2017/2017-01-12.pdf

    Here is the ig letter and why all this stuff is coming out.

  679. Bitterlaw says:

    I wonder if JC will appear today. I know we will get a heavy dose of Robbie and Corey.

  680. Tina says:

    As far as why pete the cheats emails are an issue, by themselves, maybe nothing.

    However, doj has a separate leak investigation, remeber the 27 emails,

    There is likely information that pete the cheat leaked something since he is a participant in the muh russian hoax. So, his personal emails became important and his susequent demotion.

  681. Tina says:

    One more on pete the cheat and his fbi mistress:

    On team mulehead and exchanges emails stating that he need a Watergate scandal to bring down Trump’s presidency” and ”reading up books on Watergate to ”take down his team” after the election

  682. Tina says:

    So, in summary, the seizing of pete the cheats personal emails is highly unusual. It would only be done if something more serious was found, such as leaking classified information or gubment secrets.

    Pete the cheat is in a lot of trouble as are the others.

  683. Tina says:

    Pete and his mistress do sound like the jebots here, however.

  684. Tina says:

    House Intelligence Committee investigators were contacted by an informant suggesting that there was “documentary evidence” that Strzok was purportedly obstructing the House probe into the dossier.”

    This is why all the heat is on pete and the mistress.

  685. Bitterlaw says:

    Is she a mistress or just a girlfriend?

  686. dblaikie says:

    I am sorry I missed a discussion of religion, especially with Bitter involved. On one hand Michigan Guy is correct this country is rooted in reformed Christian Doctrine. We should not forget that in the halls of Parliament the Revolution was often spoken of as a “Presbyterian Revolt”. He forgot to mention one thing, John Witherspoon’s best student was James Madison who headed the committee to write the Constitution. And the document itself is wonderful Calvinistic document founded on the doctrine of Original Sin which teaches that we are all toads at heart and so need a separation of powers to guard against corruption.

    However, Bitter is also right. In my opinion the greatest stain on my religion is centuries long antisemitism. That is why I believe that my own denomination the PCUSA needs to shut up about favoring the Palestinians over Israel. After centuries long oppression culminating in slaughter of the Jewish people in Czarist Russia and the Holocaust in Europe we gentiles have no right to lecture the Jewish people.

  687. Bitterlaw says:

    DCC

  688. Tina says:

    Bl, pete is married.

  689. Tina says:

    Maybe, bl and mnw can discuss potential Brady violations. Interested in hearing your takes.

  690. Tina says:

    I wll be back much later.

  691. dblaikie says:

    I love how the media is making more of a deal about this election. Jones won’t be seated until tax reform is finished. If he wants a future in Alabama he will have to bury his views and become a good little hypocrite with his true beliefs. If he stands strong on his beliefs he will be replaced in next year.

    But more than that you can’t blame the people of Alabama for not electing a weird guy who might well be a pervert who likes little girls.

  692. Hugh says:

    no Moore room for error to get tax reform it has to happen this year.

  693. Bitterlaw says:

    db – I respect those with deep faith. Sometimes I wish I shared it. However, I do not trust those who want America to follow “God’s Law” because it is arrogant and dangerous to believe anybody could know God’s intentions.

    I am not hostile to religion. Christmas trees in public squares or buildings? No problem. Manger scenes? Mmmm. A little close to the line. However, that is more due to me being married to a Jewish woman and realizing that she has a different view on something I never really thought about.

  694. Bitterlaw says:

    db – Jones knows he is not getting re-elected unless Moore runs again. He will vote straight Dem.

  695. dblaikie says:

    I wonder how many people in the Media are going to say that Alabama is the most likely state to flip to the GOP in 2018.

  696. MichiganGuy says:

    Bitterlaw says:
    December 13, 2017 at 7:14 am

    I also know that people like you burned my ancestors’ churches in Philadelphia.
    —————————————————————————————————–
    LOL wow BL is a funny guy. People like me would never burn a Church but, ok make of some more lies.

  697. Bitterlaw says:

    Many Founding Fathers hated Catholics and Jews. Do you deny that, MG?

  698. MichiganGuy says:

    Bitterlaw says:
    December 13, 2017 at 7:16 am
    God never disappoints me. We have an understanding. I never ask for anything because I am not important enough to deserve intercession.
    —————————————————————————————————–
    Don’t you get tired of being wrong.

    For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.

    John 3:16

  699. dblaikie says:

    Yea Bitter, I agree. I don’t believe he will be a good little hypocrite.

    On the other matter. I am glad you are not hostile to religion. And I was touched when you said “Sometimes I wished I shared it.” Be careful if you attempt to take that sentiment further, I believe what C. S. Lewis said, “Trying to find God is like the mouse trying to find the cat.”

    I deeply believe in the freedom of religion and in the separation between church and state. But that doctrine was written not to protect the state, but to protect the free practice of religion. And with that firm foundation of religious freedom, we should not forget the heritage upon which this Republic was founded.

  700. MichiganGuy says:

    BL, the Founding Fathers were of many faiths. I’m sure some of them hated Catholics. I’m sure some of them hated other Christian denominations.

  701. MichiganGuy says:

    dblaikie is a wise man.

  702. Bitterlaw says:

    Don’t you get tired of being wrong.

    For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.

    John 3:16

    MG – You do realize that what you posted is a belief rather than a fact, right? It is not capable of being proven true or false on this Earth. The people who know the answer never come back to tell us one way or the other.

    Personally, I think that my Jewish wife has a better shot at Heaven than I do. She certainly has suffered enough being married to me to deserve it.

  703. Bitterlaw says:

    The Eagles QB said that even though his season is over because of a knee injury, he believes that it is all part of GOD’s plan. Personally, I think that God may be a Dallas Cowboys fan and I am peeved at Him right now.

  704. dblaikie says:

    MichiganGuy, I appreciate your deep faith. And I can tell you are a student of Scripture. However because the Church is made up of sinners it has made some bad mistakes. For instance in the South many devoted Christians tried to justify slavery. But like I said before I believe the greatest stain on the church, is our faith’s record of antisemitism. Of course you or I would never burn down a synagogue, but in the past, many Christians did just that.

  705. MichiganGuy says:

    MN-Sen: Governor Mark Dayton plans to name a replacement at 10:00 AM today for latest pervnado casualty, Stuart Smalley Al Franken.

  706. MichiganGuy says:

    dblaikie, the past is the past. You ask Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and he will tell you; Israel has no better friend than Christians. Especially Republican conservative Christians.

  707. MichiganGuy says:

    MG – You do realize that what you posted is a belief rather than a fact, right?
    —————————————————————————————————-
    Well if you don’t believe in John 3:16 than why do you go to Mass?
    —————————————————————————————————
    “Personally, I think that my Jewish wife has a better shot at Heaven than I do. She certainly has suffered enough being married to me to deserve it.”
    ———————————————————————————————-
    Finally, we agree on something. 🙂

  708. dblaikie says:

    Bitter, humility is a great virtue! But still, you shouldn’t be so hard on yourself. At the end the day my faith teaches that we are all up the creek without a paddle. That is why grace is such a wonderful and amazing thing. And by the way for grace to be grace it is undeserved.

    Now having said that, I must say that like you my dear wife is truly my better half.

  709. MichiganGuy says:

    Bitterlaw says:
    December 13, 2017 at 8:32 am
    The Eagles QB said that even though his season is over because of a knee injury, he believes that it is all part of GOD’s plan. Personally, I think that God may be a Dallas Cowboys fan and I am peeved at Him right now.
    —————————————————————————————————
    The Steelers are going to win the Super Bowl. I’m still boycotting the NFL but, I do have friends and co-workers that feel the need to tell me what is going on.

  710. dblaikie says:

    MG I agree. But still we shouldn’t forget the past because it helps our actions now. I am glad that we are standing up for Israel.

  711. Redmen4ever says:

    Jefferson Co.

    2016 – 156,873 for Hillary; 134,768 for The Donald
    2017 – 159,522 for Jones; 66,309 for Moore

    D vote UP (not down at all, it actually increased), R vote crashed

    R’s have a strong advantage in the rural white vote, but must win their fair share of the urban black vote to win even in the South.

    In his last event of the campaign, I thought Roy Moore was endearing. He quoted all the right quotes – Sam Adams, Lincoln, FDR – concerning the religious basis of our country. And, he ended with a poem putting the words of the Declaration to rhyme and verse, and tying them to our country’s present circumstance. (I don’t exactly agree with him on everything.)

    But Steve Bannon was awful. He was not only unabashedly Southern, he was unabashedly Confederate. He was doubling down on the rural white vote (a low turnout strategy) and writing off the urban white vote. This is why people inclined his way loved his speech.

    Maybe Bannon knew low turnout was the only path to victory and, so, was playing his cards that way. Even if he knew this, it is a toxic strategy. We must get 70 percent of the white vote and 30 percent of the Hispanic and 30 percent of the Asian vote to win. Moving the dial from 8 to 10 percent among African Americans is inconsequential. But, to get the numbers we need from the other communities, we have to present ourselves as inclusive.

    This is going to sound odd, but Roy Moore’s grounding in faith is a possible way to appeal to those blacks who have enough independence of thought to consider voting Republican. Again, the purpose is not to move the dial in that community, but hit the numbers we need in the other communities. Moore can sincerely ask all voters, and African Americans in particular, to affirm their religious belief that all men are created equal, their belief in the Bible, in the goodness of work and the family. The majority in the African Americans community are social conservative even though they are incapable of breaking out of the group-think of that community.

    I tell you, I have students who cannot believe our sister parties in Ghana and in Kenya won their elections. They think because those people are black, they must be Democrats. I tell them “African American” is a special identify, not shared by black immigrants to our country from Africa or from the Caribbean, or the people of Africa. All of this is eye-opening.

    And this is also eye-opening: The Africans and Afro-Caribbeans are an increasingly large segment of the American electorate (comparable to Indian Americans). They have already surpassed African Americans in income and wealth. Although I have no idea how we will ever get a meaningful slice from the African American community, there are lots of votes we can get from the ever-changing ethnic mix that is American to win future elections.

  712. Redmen4ever says:

    Excuse me, I meant to say Republicans must win their fair share of the urban WHITE vote to win.

  713. Bitterlaw says:

    MG – Going to Mass is based on a hope for what happens after death. The time from now until then in politics does not concern God.

  714. DW says:

    At least we are rid of Moore. I am not so sure he would have won even without the scandal. He had only won statewide by four points, and exit polling showed most didn’t see their vote affected by the accusations. I guess I will never understand why primary voters wanted to throw away a sure thing in favor of an old has been twice removed judge known for being a loose cannon.

  715. mnw says:

    I doubt that AL will help McCaskill any, UNLESS the GOP fumbles the tax bill.

    I suspect 90% of Show Me staters don’t know there even was an election in AL yesterday.

    My greatest fear about ‘18 has always been the “they haven’t done anything!” issue.

  716. Redmen4ever says:

    Looks like Moore has taken off for Australia again.

  717. Robbie says:

    SEND A MESSAGE!

    Bruce Mehlman?
    @bpmehlman

    SIX GOP SENATE SEATS LOST BY RUNNING WEAKER TEA PARTY EXTREMISTS… GOP margin would be 57-43 rather than 51-49, but for:
    Alabama (Moore)
    Colorado (Buck)
    Delaware (O’Donnell)
    Indiana (Mourdock)
    Missouri (Akin)
    Nevada (Angle)

  718. jason says:

    MG is full of crap.

    Still trying to make excuses for the fact Moore has no respect for the rule of law or the Constitution.

    Ignorant fool.

  719. jason says:

    Wobbie might be a hypocritical moron still living in the primaries, but he is correct about the fact we have now thrown away 6 senate seats (+ the Joe Miller fiasco) running deadenders and still have not learned from it.

  720. MichiganGuy says:

    #726 Incorrect, the will of God permeates and supersedes every aspect of life. It is God’s will that takes precedence over everything and everyone (Matthew 6:33). God’s plans and purposes are fixed, and His will is inviolable. What He has purposed, He will bring to pass, and no government can thwart His will (Daniel 4:34-35). In fact, it is God who “sets up kings and deposes them” (Daniel 2:21) because “the Most High is sovereign over the kingdoms of men and gives them to anyone he wishes” (Daniel 4:17). A clear understanding of this truth will help us to see that politics is merely a method God uses to accomplish His will. Even though evil men abuse their political power, meaning it for evil, God means it for good, working “all things together for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28).

    https://www.google.la/amp/s/www.gotquestions.org/amp/Christian-politics.html

  721. DW says:

    731 – Moore only won his previous statewide election by four points. All the warning signs were there.

    I know it will be painful losing a vote in the senate for a few years, but in the long run GOP probably better off.

  722. Robbie says:

    Hey, Trumpsters. Are you tired of all of the winning?

  723. DW says:

    And now that the election is over, so is the listing of those accused of sexual misconduct. They got what they wanted, so accusers are no longer needed.

  724. Hugh says:

    727. The exits only measured those voting. Seems like his situation caused many reps to sit home and they voted by sitting it out.

  725. Robbie says:

    Bitterlaw says:
    December 13, 2017 at 7:33 am
    I wonder if JC will appear today. I know we will get a heavy dose of Robbie and Corey.

    – Ask and you shall receive.

  726. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 13, 2017 at 9:33 am
    Wobbie might be a hypocritical moron still living in the primaries, but he is correct about the fact we have now thrown away 6 senate seats (+ the Joe Miller fiasco) running deadenders and still have not learned from it.

    – I’m not living in the primary. I have simply been reacting to Trump’s disastrous first year as president. The problem for Trump is he has chosen not to take the presidency with the seriousness it deserves. Instead, he has chosen to litigate every slight made against him (real or perceived) and operate as if he is the host of “The Apprentice” sitting in his penthouse attacking Rosie O’Donnell. Regrettably, the results have been predictable. The Republican Party is a wreck and faces a looming wipeout in 11 months.

  727. dblaikie says:

    Robbie, Trying to picture the Alabama race as a win for Dems is funny. It was Republicans who decided this race, by not voting, by writing in other candidates. My goodness, Roy Moore was one of the worst and most flawed candidate in recent history. The Dems didn’t win on a single issue except that Alabamians didn’t want a pervert representing them. I truly feel sorry that they had such a terrible choice.

  728. dblaikie says:

    And by the way what do you mean by “disastrous first year as president”? Keystone pipeline done, de-regulation is getting done, just won in the Supreme Court with his entry policy, tax reform is close, economy is over 3% GDP and maybe the Obama Care mandate will be axed in the new tax bill. And even the Russian drivel is coming off the wheels.

  729. Trump says:

    “Robbie says:
    December 13, 2017 at 9:38 am

    Hey, Trumpsters. Are you tired of all of the winning?”

    GOP lost another seat. Where’s the downside?

  730. Trump says:

    Great win for Mitch McConnell.

    His $30m spend paid dividends.

  731. Trump says:

    I believe another $50m is warranted, propping up Flake in AZ.

  732. Robbie says:

    Whether some want to admit it or not, there is a terrible reckoning coming for the Republican Party in 2018. Alabama was a unique set of circumstances, but so was Massachusetts in 2010. The fact is, yet again, Republican turnout in a special election during Trump’s first year as president was significantly down from the results taken just months earlier in 2016. Just look at the decrease in the margin of victory in each of the races.

    Trump is a widely unpopular president after just 11 months in office. In fact, in the polling era, no president has ever been this unpopular. Unfortunately, Trump is going to be a millstone around the necks of Republican candidates all across the country just as GWB and Obama were for their parties in 2006, 2010, and 2014.

    It seems 2017 will be for the Democrats what 2009 was for Republicans and Alabama will be for the Democrats what Massachusetts was for Republicans in early 2010. A harbinger of things to come in the midterm elections. Unless something changes quickly and significantly, Republicans are going to be on the wrong end of a 2010 style political tsunami that will produce losses at every level of government.

  733. Trump says:

    The GOP message for 2018 will be enlightening.

    “Fu*ck Repealing Obamacare, Vote for Us”

  734. Trump says:

    “Unless something changes quickly and significantly…”

    Like passing bills?

  735. Trump says:

    1 year down the drain, no bills passed.

  736. Robbie says:

    By the way Trumpsters, how many miles of wall have been built in 2017?

  737. Trump says:

    Slouching towards minority.

    Well, actually, full speed ahead.

  738. Trump says:

    Is there a reason to vote GOP Congress?

  739. Trump says:

    It’s not like they intend to pass any bills.

  740. Trump says:

    How’s that 2018 spending bill coming along? You know, the one that was due Sep 30?

  741. dblaikie says:

    To compare Massachusetts to Alabama is just plain stupid. That election was about a real issue — healthcare. Alabama was about letting a possible pervert become seated as a United States Senator. The vote had nothing to do with Trump!

    November 2018 is a long way off.

  742. Robbie says:

    Trump says:
    December 13, 2017 at 10:19 am
    “Unless something changes quickly and significantly…”
    Like passing bills?

    – Nope. A tax bill won’t save Trump or the Republicans. Neither will an Obamacare repeal or any other legislation. The only thing that can change Republican fortunes in 2018 is change in Trump’s behavior.

    If Trump, essentially, goes silent on twitter and elsewhere and allows the very positive economic data to sink into the public’s mind, it’s possible his approval rating and the Party’s rating can rise as well (out of sight, out of mind). If Trump could get his approval rating average to 45% or so, the elections might be a wash or just feature small Democrats gains.

    Unfortunately, Trump isn’t going to change though. He views the presidency as a reality TV show where he has to be in the spotlight every single day whether it’s for a good reason or a bad reason.

  743. Robbie says:

    dblaikie says:
    December 13, 2017 at 10:25 am
    To compare Massachusetts to Alabama is just plain stupid. That election was about a real issue — healthcare. Alabama was about letting a possible pervert become seated as a United States Senator. The vote had nothing to do with Trump!
    November 2018 is a long way off.

    – Democrats tried to say the same thing in 2010.

  744. Trump says:

    Another set of bull cra&p from the as*wipe.

    Who has lower approval, cretin? Trump or GOP Congress?

  745. Trump says:

    The GOP decided that they will not deliver on anything.

    Results are apparent.

  746. Trump says:

    Sucks to be GOP.

    Deal with it.

  747. Robbie says:

    My very HOT take is this. If Mike Pence were to become the president in the next three to four months, Republican fortunes would turn around almost instantly in 2018. (I realize Pence isn’t going to become POTUS)

    The sour view most Americans hold of the Republican Party is almost entirely due to the country’s terribly negative view of Donald Trump. Remove the blot on the ledger and everything will start to look better.

  748. Trump says:

    “29 percent approve of Paul Ryan’s job as speaker of the House – CBS Poll”

    “Poll: McConnell’s approval in Kentucky at 18 percent”

    President Trump Job Approval
    Economist/YouGov

    Approve 41
    Disapprove 54

    Congressional Job Approval
    Economist/YouGov

    Approve 12
    Disapprove 69

    Here’s the reality.

    (Hey, Congress is up to 12 percent. Party time!)

  749. Robbie says:

    I’ve been making this point since February when Trump’s approval rating began to slide downward. No one, especially NYCmike, wanted to listen.

    Ari Fleischer?
    @AriFleischer

    Establishment candidate Ed Gillespie lost. Non-establishment candidate Roy Moore lost. The lesson: A base-only POTUS isn’t enough for gop to win. Ds hate Trump more than Rs love him. POTUS needs to increase his approval rating or D turnout will kill Rs in 2018.

  750. jason says:

    f Mike Pence were to become the president in the next three to four months,”

    Talk about frauds.

    Wobbie never had a good word to say about a conservative like Pence, but now wants to overturn the results of the election to install him as President.

    What a clown…

  751. Trump says:

    You have been peddling the same car*p for two years, as*wipe.

    The GOP Congress sucks, to its own base.

    That si why you got Trump. And Moore.

    Deal with it.

  752. jason says:

    Trump, essentially, goes silent on twitter a”

    Yep, that would fit Wobbie’s dream of 100% MSM fake news 24/7 with no opposition.

    Not going to happen.

  753. Trump says:

    “D turnout will kill Rs in 2018.”

    Ha ha ha

    Maybe the GOP critters could pass a bill?

  754. Trump says:

    “29 percent approve of Paul Ryan’s job as speaker of the House – CBS Poll”

    “Poll: McConnell’s approval in Kentucky at 18 percent”

    All Trump’s fault, I guess?

  755. Trump says:

    Basic function of GOP Congress: where’s the 2018 spending bill?

  756. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 13, 2017 at 10:37 am
    f Mike Pence were to become the president in the next three to four months,”
    Talk about frauds.
    Wobbie never had a good word to say about a conservative like Pence, but now wants to overturn the results of the election to install him as President.
    What a clown…

    – Not only are you a fraud, you’re a liar and a clown.

    Mike Pence was on of my preferred choices early in the 2012 process.

    I don’t agree with Pence on every issue, but he would be an excellent president, especially in comparison to the idiot we have now. And if he were to choose Condo Rice or Nikki Haley as VPOTUS, the party would soar.

    That said, I was critical of Pence for agreeing to be Trump’s VP. I thought he was throwing away his career by signing up for Trump’s crapfest. I didn’t expect Trump tow in, but since he did I sure am glad it’s Pence and not Newt or Christie.

  757. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 13, 2017 at 10:39 am
    Trump, essentially, goes silent on twitter a”
    Yep, that would fit Wobbie’s dream of 100% MSM fake news 24/7 with no opposition.
    Not going to happen.

    – It’s so amazing to watch you become more and more of Trumpist. Trump shoots himself in the foot every day on twitter and your response is “but muh liberal media”.

    You’re a joke. You’ve marinated far too long in conservative-only talking points.

  758. dblaikie says:

    Robbie, I have not seen so much excitement in you sense the week before last years election. Just like now you were so sure. Oh well, there is no reasoning with you. You would make a good member of the old Soviet .

  759. Redmen4ever says:

    730 I don’t know if you are the person I have previously corrected.

    Delaware does not clearly belong on this list.

    Belonging on this list, to make it fair, are the establish candidates who lost due to third-party defections.

    I have already identified several. What you have identified is that you have no interest in being fair. By my count we have lost as many seats to third-party siphoning as to wacky-right wingers winning the nomination.

    For that matter, we nominated a responsible ticket in Virginia and got wiped out there, and may still lose the House of Delegates (I believe one seat is in court).

    The best Republican candidates can simultaneously motivate the base, minimize third-party siphoning and appeal to moderate and swing voters. I realize this is a tall order.

    This problem becomes relatively easy when you’re in the minority. You just emphasize criticism of the other party and of its candidates. Things fray when in the majority.

  760. Trump says:

    Mike Pence is a nobody, that is why the as*wipe Robbie is pushing him.

    Pence barely squeaked by in 2012, by 3 points, at the same time when Romney won IN by 10.

    He was struggling in bid for re-election in 2016 until Trump bailed him out.

  761. Robbie says:

    dblaikie says:
    December 13, 2017 at 10:52 am
    Robbie, I have not seen so much excitement in you sense the week before last years election. Just like now you were so sure. Oh well, there is no reasoning with you. You would make a good member of the old Soviet .

    – I am excited a child molester lost. If that bothers you, tough.

    I’m not, however, excited Republicans are in such bad shape. Unlike most here though, I’m not going to tell myself fairy tales that everything is going to be fine when it’s clear things aren’t.

  762. Trump says:

    Here’s all 2016 polls for Mike Pence when he was running for Gov.

    In ruby-red Indiana

    Mike Pence (R) John Gregg (D)
    Bellwether Research May 11–15, 2016 40% 36%
    WTHR/Howey April 18–21, 2016
    49% 45%

  763. Paul says:

    I love that the solution for the GOP is to pass a bill that few of their constituents want.

  764. Redmen4ever says:

    Trump, if you weren’t so vulgar, you might be persuasive. As it is, you’re just pleasuring yourself with your hate.

    Now, as for Indiana, the Big 10 states from Pennsylvania to Iowa and Minnesota are shifting. A lot of Republicans can claim credit for this, including populists, conservatives and moderates. It couldn’t be otherwise. Pence may indeed be mostly a beneficiary of all this.

    Romney, in 2012, only worked step 1 of Karl Rove’s 2+3+1 plan. Romney carried IN and NC. But, looking back to 2008, Obama only carried those two states because of third-party siphoning.

  765. Trump says:

    I am not here to persuade anyone. This, like most blogs, is a infinitisemly miniscule forum of anonymous idiots.

  766. Trump says:

    To win, a candidate has to attract voters.

    Pence does not.

    Not his fault, he is just not a barn-burner.

  767. Trump says:

    If you have to win nationwide, you can’t squeak by in IN by 3.

  768. Trump says:

    For a Republican, that is.

  769. mnw says:

    It’s irritating to have 2 posters with the “Trump” screen name.

  770. Robbie says:

    Trump says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:13 am
    To win, a candidate has to attract voters.
    Pence does not.
    Not his fault, he is just not a barn-burner.

    – Where’s the evidence the country is looking for a barnburner candidate? I haven’t seen any.

    My view is the country would enjoy a “return to normalcy” candidate who mostly stays out of the news and keeps as low a profile as a president can in this day and age, especially after eight years of Obama and a year of Trump.

  771. Redmen4ever says:

    Trump post 776 was fine. I would point out that Indiana only looks Ruby Red when you look at the Presidential. The Goober race always looked competitive. (Let’s give Trump a little recognition for seeing his opportunity to outperform the Republican baseline in the Big 10 states.)
    PREZ Trump by 19 (w/ 5 to libt)
    SEN Young by 10 (w/ 5 to Libt)
    GOV Holcomb by 6 (w/ 3 to Libt)

  772. Trump says:

    Like Jeb!?

    Ha ha ha

    Who would go out to vote for a “low-profile” candidate? They have to wake up first.

  773. NYCmike says:

    https://twitter.com/RandyEBarnett/status/940812135252353025

    -I see that Robbie is in full happy mode…..ascribing all blame to Trump, and none to the inactivity out of DC…..hopefully, the civics lessons will kick in shortly, and the President will be given a bill to sign…..one of these days.

  774. Trump says:

    I have been harping since Spring that the GOP Congress is “slouching to minority”.

    No runway left, folks.

  775. Trump says:

    “If GOP would only do what it promises its voters, they wouldn’t have to reach for demonstrable “outsiders” who might just be crazy enough to do what the voters want—or turn out to just be plain crazy.”

    “…do what it promises its voters”

    Crazy talk.

  776. NYCmike says:

    Still waiting for a list of liberal policies pushed by Trump….

    Still waiting for “CG” and Robbie to show me where the Executive Branch is responsible for writing legislation, as opposed to the LEGISLATIVE BRANCH.

  777. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:23 am

    I see that Robbie is in full happy mode…..ascribing all blame to Trump, and none to the inactivity out of DC…..hopefully, the civics lessons will kick in shortly, and the President will be given a bill to sign…..one of these days.

    – NYCmike, who believes Trump has never done anything wrong as president, resorts to his empty, fake, fraudulent talking point that I’m happy about the current state of things.

    Wrong. I have been warning since February that Trump was crushing the Republican Party with his asinine antics. Regrettably, we’re seeing that play out.

    The only way I’ll be happy anytime in the future is if Trump is forced from office. Since that’s not going to happen, I’m going to remain very unhappy about the direction of the party.

  778. Paul says:

    I was thinking about how different some of our worlds are.

    My son’s middle school has a popular program called “operation snowflake” which includes programs about “say no to drugs” , “gangs are bad”, “don’t bully” and team building stuff and dances. Most of the school attends these.

    I find it funny how the school proudly adopted the “snowflake” nickname.

  779. NYCmike says:

    “I’m going to remain very unhappy about the direction of the party.”

    -What “direction” would that be?

    Under Obama, it was to the left, off the cliff.

    Which direction is Trump trying to take us?

    Please provide examples to show the direction you think he is taking us.

  780. Trump says:

    ” I’m going to remain very unhappy about the direction of the party.”

    That’s why people chose Trump.

    Shining the light on the the lying cockroaches and watch them scatter.

  781. Robbie says:

    No matter how many times people make the point to NYCmike that Trump, since his party controls both chambers, plays an active role in the legislative process, he continues to pretend Trump is just a bystander who merely serves as a functionary who does nothing more than sign documents.

    Why does he do that? Because NYCmike believes he must protect the Trump at all costs. It can never be Trump’s fault.

  782. NYCmike says:

    “– NYCmike, who believes Trump has never done anything wrong as president,”

    -What “wrong” has he done, when taken in context with the fight that is being waged?

    Trump has acted the same way as President as he has always acted. He also has attempted to govern on the promises he made on the campaign trail.

    He is far from perfect, but the alternative would have been MUCH WORSE.

  783. Paul says:

    School is also 70% hispanic. I’ve found the school to be a good place so far. My son was homeschooled until this year (8th grade) so was pretty worried about the transition. But pretty good so far. No gangs. Everyone is very friendly to my son. There is also likely an advantage to being a white minority in a school because everyone (kids and teachers) know you.

  784. NYCmike says:

    Robbie,

    I am well aware, and I have said this many times, that the President is able to influence legislation.

    MY POINT, as I have also repeatedly said, is there should have been NO REASON to allow for his influence, since the REpublicans had 8 years to prepare for this moment, and had also passed legislation through Congress under Obama which Trump would gladly have signed.

    Simply recycle the Obama vetoed bills and send them to Trump.

    What could have been more simple than that!?!?

  785. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:34 am
    “I’m going to remain very unhappy about the direction of the party.”
    -What “direction” would that be?
    Under Obama, it was to the left, off the cliff.
    Which direction is Trump trying to take us?
    Please provide examples to show the direction you think he is taking us.

    – Looks like NYCmike has OD’ed on dummy pills. Under Obama (and without Trump in the picture), Republicans held 249 House seats and 54 Senate seats after the 2014 elections. The House number was the party’s largest in the House since 1928. The Senate number was the party’s second largest since 1928.

    Seems to me the party was headed in a pretty good direction. Of course, I care about winning elections. NYCmike cares about sending a message and supporting candidates who lose unlosable races and send out toughly worded fundraising emails.

  786. NYCmike says:

    Robbie,

    You, along with “leaders” in Congress, conveniently say that the President MUST LEAD when it comes to legislation.

    It is utter B*llsh*t, it is spelled out in the Constitution, in the Federalist Papers, in the writings of most of the people who founded this nation. The LEGISLATURE is supposed to lead when it comes to legislation.

    This Congress has FAILED in that regard so far, and people like you provide cover for them.

  787. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:37 am
    “– NYCmike, who believes Trump has never done anything wrong as president,”
    -What “wrong” has he done, when taken in context with the fight that is being waged?

    – And there it is. “But he fights”, the Trumpian battle cry. Legislative results? Who cares about that when you can send out a tweet about wiretapping, a media member’s facelift, or suggesting a female senator would blow him for campaign donations.

    NYCmike yapps abut policy, but all he really cares about are candidates who are motivated by grievance and emotion.

  788. NYCmike says:

    “Seems to me the party was headed in a pretty good direction.”

    -It was. Passing good legislation, that Obama vetoed.

    Send the same legislation to Trump, and he signs it.

    WHY DIDN’T THEY?

  789. NYCmike says:

    -It was. Passing good legislation, that Obama vetoed.

    Send the same legislation to Trump, and he signs it.

    WHY DIDN’T THEY?

  790. NYCmike says:

    Send the same legislation to Trump, and he signs it.

    WHY DIDN’T THEY?

  791. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:44 am
    Robbie,
    You, along with “leaders” in Congress, conveniently say that the President MUST LEAD when it comes to legislation.
    It is utter B*llsh*t, it is spelled out in the Constitution, in the Federalist Papers, in the writings of most of the people who founded this nation. The LEGISLATURE is supposed to lead when it comes to legislation.
    This Congress has FAILED in that regard so far, and people like you provide cover for them.

    – It’s like listening to Mark Levin. It’s the lifelong Republicans who are the problem. It’s the Johnny come lately fakes like lifelong liberal Trump who are the saviors.

  792. NYCmike says:

    Robbie,

    Stop your deflecting.

    Why didn’t they send Trump the same legislation that Obama vetoed?

    Trump would have signed.

  793. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:45 am
    “Seems to me the party was headed in a pretty good direction.”
    -It was. Passing good legislation, that Obama vetoed.
    Send the same legislation to Trump, and he signs it.
    WHY DIDN’T THEY?

    – Talk to your boys in the Freedom Caucus. Talk to your boy Rand Paul in the Senate.

    Maybe if Trump hadn’t been a historically unpopular winner and not cost the party eight House seats, there’d have been enough votes to pass some of your dream legislation like the dumb DREAM Act.

  794. NYCmike says:

    “. It’s the Johnny come lately fakes like lifelong liberal Trump who are the saviors.”

    -This statement is total proof that you ignore everything I say.

    THE MAIN REASON to elect Trump, along with a Republican Congress, was so that the non-ideological Trump does NOT have to be the SAVIOR, he just has to SIGN THE BILLS, sent to him by “the lifelong Republicans”.

    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

  795. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:48 am
    Robbie,
    Stop your deflecting.

    – Stop deflecting? Ha! You’re the one who refuses to accept that Trump has any blame for anything. You’re the one who always blames everyone but Trump. You’re the one who deflects.

  796. NYCmike says:

    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

  797. NYCmike says:

    Robbie refuses to answer that simple question:

    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

  798. NYCmike says:

    Luther Strange would be Senator for life, IF he had voted on the bills that Obama vetoed, they passed, and Trump had signed them into law.

    YET, Robbie refuses to answer the question that Republican voters across the nation are asking:

    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

  799. Robbie says:

    So NYCmike now argues the best way to get the legislation he wants is to elect a non-ideological candidate who serves as a rubber stamp. Good lord.

    The fact Trump is legislatively illiterate is precisely the reason it has been so hard to get bills passed. No one knows what the idiot wants because he has no idea what he wants. He just wants to sit in the Oval Office, hear “Hail to the Chief”, and tweet.

  800. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:53 am
    Luther Strange would be Senator for life, IF he had voted on the bills that Obama vetoed, they passed, and Trump had signed them into law.

    – How dumb are you? Strange voted for every piece of legislation that came before him. It’s your Tea Party hero Rand Paul who won’t vote for things because he’s so pure.

  801. NYCmike says:

    “So NYCmike now argues the best way to get the legislation he wants is to elect a non-ideological candidate who serves as a rubber stamp. Good lord.”

    -I didn’t say that at all.

    That was the choice we were given: Trump or Hillary.

    Who was best to work with a Republican Congress: Trump or Hillary?

    Obviously, Hillary would NOT HAVE SIGNED the legislation vetoed by Obama.

    That left Trump, who would sign the legislation vetoed by Obama.

    Pretty easy choice.

  802. NYCmike says:

    Please answer:

    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

  803. BayernFan says:

    1. Pass the Senate Tax Bill and get it off the plate.
    2. Come up with an infrastructure bill
    3. build the Wall

  804. NYCmike says:

    The root of all the problems – no legislation passed, and signed into law.

    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

    Robbie refuses to even contemplate an answer…..just reflexively blames Trump and his Twitter feed.

  805. Phil says:

    Trump has two problems in the next year. Very real possibility and perhaps even better than 50-50 that Republicans lose the House. That means Trump will be impeached. The House Democrats are simply waiting for the numbers. If you think they won’t vote articles of impeachment you are naïve. Impeachment will bog Trump down for the remainder of his term. That’s the goal.

    Second problem. Accusations of sexual harassment. The judiciary committee today had Democrats asking for an investigation of Trump and sexual misconduct. The Russia investigation is running into big problems. They are pivoting. Alabama showed them the way. They have cleared the decks of Franken and Conyers. Here it comes.

  806. BayernFan says:

    So does this mean Franken resigns?

  807. Paul says:

    “I’m happier than Roy Moore at a Girl Scout Camp.”

  808. Phil says:

    Of course Franken leaves. Why would Democrats keep him around? They have a Democratic governor appointing his replacement to keep the seat blue. Just replace one liberal loon with another, and get rid of Franken’s baggage all in one swoop – win win. Now they can claim the high ground and are free to go after “sexual predator” Trump. As I said – here it comes.

  809. BayernFan says:

    We’ll see.

  810. NYCmike says:

    “As I said – here it comes.”

    -And “Republicans” like Robbie, MD, “CG” will help the Democrats along the way.

  811. BayernFan says:

    825….yup. Republicans have been eating their own from time immemorial.

  812. Cash Cow TM says:

    More failures within the basic core institutions that used to make up the fabric of America…

  813. Trump says:

    “Under Obama (and without Trump in the picture), Republicans held 249 House seats and 54 Senate seats after the 2014 elections. The House number was the party’s largest in the House since 1928. The Senate number was the party’s second largest since 1928.

    Seems to me the party was headed in a pretty good direction.”

    The fuc*tard cretin ignores the fact that the GOP Congress gained its strength based on the promise to REPEAL OBAMACARE.

    And they promptly reneged as soon as they were able to.

    Good luck with minority status, you earned it.

  814. Robbie says:

    BayernFan says:
    December 13, 2017 at 12:05 pm
    1. Pass the Senate Tax Bill and get it off the plate.
    2. Come up with an infrastructure bill
    3. build the Wall

    – Point 3 will never happen. Even if points 1 and 2 do, they won’t save the party. This is all about Trump. That’s the way he’s always wanted it and that’s the way he will continue to operate.

    Trump must either realize presidents are expected to act a certain way, or the beatings will continue to until morale improves.

    What Virginia and to a lesser extent Alabama show is the GOP vote is demoralized and unenthused and the suburbs are moving hard away from Republicans right now.

  815. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 12:50 pm
    “As I said – here it comes.”
    -And “Republicans” like Robbie, MD, “CG” will help the Democrats along the way.

    – What a load of BS, but sadly that’s typical from you these days.

    I’ve never voted for a Democrats and won’t vote for a Democrat either. That doesn’t mean I’m going to degrade myself by voting for a child molester.

    Sorry.

  816. Trump says:

    So pass a fu cking bill, morons.

    Where’s the 2018 spending bill, the least that this bunch of cockroaches could do?

  817. Trump says:

    “We promised to repeal Obamacare, we failed. Vote for us.”

    Run on it, idiots.

  818. Robbie says:

    Cash Cow TM says:
    December 13, 2017 at 1:00 pm
    More failures within the basic core institutions that used to make up the fabric of America…

    – This is an under reported fact, but it best explains why so many are so willing to put their faith in usual people and things.

  819. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 13, 2017 at 12:24 pm
    Trump has two problems in the next year. Very real possibility and perhaps even better than 50-50 that Republicans lose the House. That means Trump will be impeached. The House Democrats are simply waiting for the numbers. If you think they won’t vote articles of impeachment you are naïve. Impeachment will bog Trump down for the remainder of his term. That’s the goal.
    Second problem. Accusations of sexual harassment. The judiciary committee today had Democrats asking for an investigation of Trump and sexual misconduct. The Russia investigation is running into big problems. They are pivoting. Alabama showed them the way. They have cleared the decks of Franken and Conyers. Here it comes.

    – This all correct except there’s no evidence the Russia investigation is running into problems. For goodness sakes, they just got a guilty plea from Flynn and the promise of cooperation. They’re only now learning what he has to say.

    That said, Phil is right. Trump’s got a terrible political mess on his hands that could bring his presidency to a halt. On top of that, the atmosphere surrounding sexual harassment is not going to be good for Trump.

  820. Robbie says:

    Yesterday, it was the Marist poll. Today, it’s Monmouth. These are the kinds of numbers we saw heading into 2008. Trump is bubonic plague.

    Noah Rothman?
    @NoahCRothman

    Dude. Monmouth gives Ds a 15-point edge on the generic ballot, 51-36%

  821. Trump says:

    Ha ha ha

    Quick, pass a bill.

  822. NYCmike says:

    “I’ve never voted for a Democrats and won’t vote for a Democrat either.”

    -Who said anything about voting?

    You will help Democrats by repeating every MSM talking point over and over, instead of presenting a united front as an opposition party.

    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

  823. NYCmike says:

    Maybe Trump should act “Presidential” like George W Bush did in 2005-06……that worked out well.

  824. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 1:20 pm
    “I’ve never voted for a Democrats and won’t vote for a Democrat either.”
    -Who said anything about voting?
    You will help Democrats by repeating every MSM talking point over and over, instead of presenting a united front as an opposition party.
    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

    – And you will hurt the Republican Party by repeating every insane, idiotic, Tea party, real conservative talking point you hear from Mark Levin and the other idiots who help form your misguided views.

  825. Trump says:

    “Thursday, November 30, 2017

    The Republican-led Congress earns its lowest job approval marks this year, perhaps in part because of its failure to pass any major legislation.”

    Drink it in, Republicans.

  826. Trump says:

    “…just 13% of Likely U.S. Voters now think Congress is doing a good or excellent job. That’s down slightly from 15% in July but significantly lower than February’s 11-year high of 25%, just after President Trump took office and Republicans controlled both the presidency and the Congress for the first time in 10 years.”

  827. Trump says:

    “59% of voters believe it’s likely Republicans will lose control of Congress, and voters personally are leaning towards returning the Democrats to control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate for the first time since early 2011. ”

    Gave the lying cockroaches a chance, didn’t deliver.

  828. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 1:23 pm
    Maybe Trump should act “Presidential” like George W Bush did in 2005-06……that worked out well.

    – Proving that NYCmike is just not smart, he equates a war gone bad and a faltering economy with erratic behavior and petty twitter fights. Spoiler: they aren’t remotely the same.

    Maybe you should just take some time off. You’re desperate efforts to shill for Trump are making you look really out of touch.

  829. Trump says:

    “Congress is currently wrestling with the biggest reform of the U.S. tax code in decades, and 62% of all voters think it is important for Congress to pass a tax reform bill before the end of the year. But only 36% think it is even somewhat likely that Congress will make a big change in the tax code.

    Just 16% want to leave Obamacare as is, but the Congress has fallen short several times this year in its efforts to change the health care law.”

  830. Trump says:

    “Voters are more likely to believe Republicans in Congress are the bigger problem for Trump than Democrats are.”

  831. Trump says:

    “Sixty-seven percent (67%) of GOP voters believe Republicans in Congress have lost touch with the party’s base throughout the nation over the past several years.”

    67% of GOP voters!

    That’s why “establishment” GOP will keep losing.

  832. Trump says:

    About 50-80 GOP congress critters should start thinking of alternate vocation come next November.

  833. Trump says:

    I think the GOP Congress needs a different voter base.

    This one’s lost.

  834. Tgca says:

    I think it’s funny that most of the typical MSM and GOP/DEM elitists are prognosticating what Moore’s loss means for the GOP and Trump. I just saw Larry Sabato stating Trump is out of touch. The fact is that almost every single one of these folks have got it enormously wrong through 2016 and 2017 so I don’t think they have a track record of accuracy to predict anything. Given the facts on this case, the Moore loss would have occurred regardless of whether we had Trump, Jeb, Rubio, HRC, Obama, Oprah, or Snoopy as POTUS. It was not a backlash on POTUS, it was whether the AL GOP wanted to send a man accused of inappropriate sexual harrassmemt/assault/behavior to the Senate. If the AL GOP wanted to win this seat, they could have easily done that but the AL GOP split on that.

    Trying to extend this as some insight of things to come for Trump or the GOP is absurd and these prognosticators are falling into the same trap they did before. The bigger issue is how many more CongressCritters will be accused of sexual impropriety and have to step down which so far seems to be more at risk for Dems and their supporters in Hollywood and the MSM.

  835. Tgca says:

    Poll after poll seems to show Trump basically still where he was on Election Day with respect to overall support and party support. It will change a bit up and down, but he’s consistent so I don’t see a big backlash yet as long as the economy stays stable.

    Sure, the GOP May lose some House seats in the mid-term but that is par for the course based on history.

  836. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    809. “– Stop deflecting? Ha! You’re the one who refuses to accept that Trump has any blame for anything. You’re the one who always blames everyone but Trump. You’re the one who deflects.”

    Robbie, if your saying Trump is responsible, are you claiming that Moore could have won without Trump?

  837. Paul says:

    I think an important lesson to be learned is that Trump should have gone full Bannon/Roy Moore. He was holding back way too much.

  838. Hugh says:

    845. Trump lovers think gop is sick of establishment and those who do not like trump are tired of his base. There is a schism. There are two bases and they need each other dislike each other and do t trust each other

  839. Robbie says:

    Wow! So much winning.

    NBC Politics?
    @NBCPolitics

    Monmouth poll: Trump’s job approval rate dips to 32%, with a precipitous drop among women without party affiliation http://www.monmouth.edu/polling

  840. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    Alabama results:

    Madison County
    Trump 55% Clinton 38%
    Jones 57% Moore 42%

    Mobile County
    Trump 55% Clinton 42%
    Jones 56% 42%

    A lot of this appears to be lower Republican turnout; a lot of Republican voters did to Moore what Democratic voters did to Hillary — stayed home and did not vote.

  841. Robbie says:

    Tgca says:
    December 13, 2017 at 1:57 pm
    Poll after poll seems to show Trump basically still where he was on Election Day with respect to overall support and party support. It will change a bit up and down, but he’s consistent so I don’t see a big backlash yet as long as the economy stays stable.
    Sure, the GOP May lose some House seats in the mid-term but that is par for the course based on history.

    – Hillary Clinton won’t be on the ballot in 2018. That’s the big difference between 2016 and 2018. That and the fact we’ll have two years of Trump as the actual president.

    But keep telling yourself a president with an approval rating in the 30’s and a generic ballot that shows a 10 point or more deficit is no biggie.

  842. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    851. “{I think an important lesson to be learned is that Trump should have gone full Bannon/Roy Moore. He was holding back way too much.”

    The fact a troll would say this points to how much a detriment Bannon is. Hopefully Bannon can be pushed aside so he does not do damage in other Senate races in 2018.

  843. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 13, 2017 at 2:10 pm
    809. “– Stop deflecting? Ha! You’re the one who refuses to accept that Trump has any blame for anything. You’re the one who always blames everyone but Trump. You’re the one who deflects.”
    Robbie, if your saying Trump is responsible, are you claiming that Moore could have won without Trump?

    – I’m saying Trump is responsible for the overall malaise and despair that permeates the Republican Party today.

    Moore lost because he was a vile creep. But that said, it’s conceivable he might have won had Trump not so thoroughly turned off suburban voters with his asshattery.

  844. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    855. “Hillary Clinton won’t be on the ballot in 2018.”

    Thankfully neither will Moore. A horrible candidate will lose regardless. Robbie, are you saying that if Strange was the Republican candidate yesterday in Alabama he would have lost because of Trump?

  845. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    857. “Moore lost because he was a vile creep. But that said, it’s conceivable he might have won had Trump not so thoroughly turned off suburban voters with his asshattery.”

    You seriously believe that? Without Trump’s lukewarm endorsement, I think he would have done much worse.

  846. Robbie says:

    This is why I put almost no credence in robo pollsters like Emerson and Rasmussen. People here should really stop paying attention to them.

    Barry Burden?
    @bcburden

    Analysis by UW soc grad student Nathan Seltzer says @EmersonPolling showing Moore +10 included internet respondents who might not have even been Alabama residents. #ALSen

  847. Paul says:

    I think Roy Moore’s slavery comment likely was one of the bigger impacts in the race.

  848. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 13, 2017 at 2:46 pm
    855. “Hillary Clinton won’t be on the ballot in 2018.”
    Thankfully neither will Moore. A horrible candidate will lose regardless. Robbie, are you saying that if Strange was the Republican candidate yesterday in Alabama he would have lost because of Trump?

    – No, of course not. Strange would have won easily and the race never would have received the kind of attention that would have brought outside forces like Trump into play.

    The fact the race became competitive and nationalized allowed Trump to interject himself and that almost certainly played a role with a small number of voters, especially in the suburbs. Alabama was perfect storm and Moore’s problems opened the door to Trump becoming part of the action. Trump was hardly decisive though.

  849. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 13, 2017 at 2:48 pm
    857. “Moore lost because he was a vile creep. But that said, it’s conceivable he might have won had Trump not so thoroughly turned off suburban voters with his asshattery.”
    You seriously believe that? Without Trump’s lukewarm endorsement, I think he would have done much worse.

    – Yes, I seriously believe that or I wouldn’t have written it.

  850. Trump says:

    “Moore lost because he was a vile creep. But that said, it’s conceivable he might have won had Trump not so thoroughly turned off suburban voters with his asshattery.”

    Where is the evidence that Trump has turned off suburban voters, asw*ipe cretin?

    Did you just make this sh*t up, as usual?

  851. Trump says:

    According to 2016 exits, Trump won the suburbs 49-45.

    Which is better than either Bush’s 2004 or Romney’s 2012 performance, cretin.

  852. Trump says:

    “I’m saying Trump is responsible for the overall malaise and despair that permeates the Republican Party today.”

    You say a lot of cra*p.

    The Republican Party is responsible for the overall malaise and despair that permeates the Republican Party.

    Direct result of years of lying and cheating. Chickens coming home to roost.

  853. Trump says:

    When 67 percent of your own voters hate you, despair and malaise will prevail.

  854. Proud Obamacon says:

    OK next order of business y’all is to pass yall’s tax bill. Hurry do it pleeeeeze!

  855. Trump says:

    “Sixty-seven percent (67%) of GOP voters believe Republicans in Congress have lost touch with the party’s base throughout the nation over the past several years.”

    I deliberately left out the second part of the survey.

    “Democrats are more critical of their representatives, too, but 51% still think those representatives have done a good job maintaining the party’s values.”

    That is why Dems are getting to the polls to support their congress candidates, and Reps are sitting home.

    Who wants to trudge through inconvenience to vote for candidates they hate?

  856. Trump says:

    “…so thoroughly turned off suburban voters ”

    Can you cite any data, cretin Robbie?

    The last factual data is, “According to 2016 exits, Trump won the suburbs 49-45.”

  857. Trump says:

    Clinton Trump Other/No Answer
    Urban area (34%) 60% 34% 6%
    Suburban area (49%) 45% 49% 6%
    Rural area (17%) 34% 61% 5%
    24558 respondents

  858. dblaikie says:

    Typical bogus poll from Monmouth.
    1. 28% Republican
    31% Democrat
    41% Independent
    BOGUS

    2. 188 liberals polled
    274 conservatives polled
    314 moderates
    ONCE AGAIN BOGUS. I would wager that about 300 of the moderates tilt liberal.

    Put these bogus numbers together and you get Democrat + 12 Generic ballot and Trump at 32%.

    And by the way Robbie, Rasmussen has a better record than most college and media pollsters.

  859. Robbie says:

    Roger Stone is writing a back about Trump’s downfall and removal from office.

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/12/roger-stone-book-fall-of-trump

  860. Robbie says:

    Great. We’re back to poll truthing. That always ends well. What’s next? The delbov curve? The Bradley effect?

  861. Trump says:

    Any citation on “thoroughly turned off suburban voters”, as@wipe?

    Or should we chalk this up as another of your lies?

  862. Trump says:

    Or, more accurately, the next in line of your constant lies?

  863. Trump says:

    Robbie the cretin, lying as always.

  864. Hugh says:

    869. In answer to your last question. Smart realists

  865. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    “That is why Dems are getting to the polls to support their congress candidates, and Reps are sitting home. Who wants to trudge through inconvenience to vote for candidates they hate?”

    Don’t forget that the Republicans won five congressional special elections this year. In the one in Utah last month the Republican got 30% higher a vote than the Democrat.

    It all depends on the quality of the candidate, hopefully the Alabama election damages the ability of Bannon to support fringe candidates.

  866. Bitterlaw says:

    #726 Incorrect, the will of God permeates and supersedes every aspect of life.

    Again, MG confuses beliefs with facts.

  867. Trump says:

    One of the big winners of the AL election last night was Mitch McConnell.

    He spent $30m+ to defeat Roy Moore, and I think that made the 1.5% difference.

  868. Trump says:

    So cretin Robbie, what’s the evidence that Trunp has massively turned off suburban voters?

  869. Trump says:

    Regarding suburban voters,

    Trump +4
    Romney +2
    McCain -2
    Bush 2004 +5
    Bush 200 +3

    So, in fact, McCain massively turned off suburban voters.

  870. Trump says:

    I know, math is hard for morons.

  871. Wes says:

    Trump says:
    December 13, 2017 at 11:13 am
    To win, a candidate has to attract voters.

    That explains exactly why Roy Moore lost.

    No one liked him or wanted him as Senator.

  872. Trump says:

    885: Right on.

  873. mnw says:

    Without the sex allegations, Moore would’ve won even more easily than Handel did in GA.

    If the trolls want to use Moore’s loss under these unique conditions to extrapolate GOP disaster generally, then a mind is a terrible thing to waste; your brain on crack, etc.

  874. Phil says:

    Roger Stone? The man who wrote The Man Who Killed Kennedy: The case against LBJ?

    Robbie thinks this is significant? A reach even for him.

  875. Trump says:

    McCain was a disaster in the suburbs. A 7-point drop-off from Bush.

  876. Wes says:

    PseudoTrump forgets McConnell spent the $30 million in the primary and runoff. Moore lost because he was unlikable theocrat who was already a chronic underperformer.

    As with his buddy Fob James, Alabamans got tired of him and showed him the door.

  877. Phil says:

    890

    Wes nails it.

  878. Bitterlaw says:

    Wes – I hate to tell you this but you are not following God’s plan. Talk to MG before it is too late.

  879. Bitterlaw says:

    Since I was right about Virginia and Alabama, I will now claim Guru status. Polaris lived off his prediction in a 2005 Georgia election for years (until the voters betrayed him in 2008 and 2012).

  880. Wes says:

    When the candidates claim to fame is being a law-defying judge, who exactly wants to make him responsible for making laws?

    Moore was always the worst available candidate. Naturally the remnants of the Tea Party and other assorted Deadenders gave him the nomination.

    Res ipsa loquitur.

  881. Trump says:

    The moron thinks that what happens in primaries/runoffs remain in primaries/runoffs.

    Like Vegas.

    And the $30m against Moore was in runoffs. In primaries, McCannell spent to take out Mo Brooks and pave way for Luthar.

    McConnell is a very effective spender of campaign money.

  882. CG says:

    According to the exit polls I can find, Romney received 50% of the “suburban” vote in 2012 and GWB received 52% in 2004, in comparison with Trump receiving 49% in 2016.

    Of course, that does not take into account the types of suburbs. There are blue collar, traditionally Democrat suburbs where Trump did better, but all data suggests that upscale, white-collar suburbs, that are traditionally Republican, saw him way behind the traditional Republican vote.

  883. Trump says:

    Any data, moron?

    Or just your hunch?

  884. Wes says:

    I’m glad I don’t believe in God then, Bitter, if his plan is the election of sanctimonious theocrats determined to break the law when it suits them.

  885. Trump says:

    “all data suggests that upscale, white-collar suburbs, that are traditionally Republican, saw him way behind the traditional Republican vote.

    I am sure you can find “all data”.

  886. Bitterlaw says:

    CM

  887. CG says:

    Just Google the exit polls It sounds like you already did actually, since you posted the margins.

  888. Trump says:

    No, you cited “all data” on types of suburbs.

    You made it up.

  889. Wes says:

    So the guy who got exactly every prediction wrong last year falls back on his traditional “moron” retort when feeling threatened at having his idiotic analysis questioned.

    Show of hands from all thinking the fifth grader posing as a master psephologist would not be so predictable, but then I’bve clearly promoted you beyond your age and level of maturity.

  890. Bitterlaw says:

    I want to know why God allowed Carson Wentz to blow out his knee. Wentz is a religious man.

    Maybe it was Sir Carmine.

  891. CG says:

    When one looks at the difference between 2012 and 2016 by Congressional district, and the Presidential vote (as I am working through the most recent Almanac of American Politics), it’s very striking.

    Any place with rural or blue collar whites saw Clinton do way worse than Obama, while any place with highly educated or white collar voters saw the absolute reverse and Trump’s numbers well below Romney.

    So, his campaign did very well in getting recent Democrat voters, while also losing recent Republican voters.

    Are those Democrats likely to stick with him in the 2018 midterms and beyond?

  892. Proud Obamacon says:

    Just curious, has DW posted the minute-by-minute recap of last night’s events? Please also include Breitbart’s live blog – that was delish.

    Waiting…..

    LOL

  893. CG says:

    Fox News was definitely first to say Jones won, while MSNBC never officially even declared him the winner as far as I could tell.

    Was Trump watching Fox?

  894. Wes says:

    Where’s SusyQue to tell us God is a Republican? How can a Republican God let a Democrat winin Alabama?

  895. Trump says:

    Here’s reality about suburban white voters, to dispel the lies:

    “While it is true that many rural voters who backed Obama in 2008 and 2012 voted for Trump this year, these voters hardly comprise the majority of Trump’s 60 million votes, as rural voters made up only 17 percent of this year’s electorate. Most rural voters generally vote Republican anyway. Clinton’s decision not to target these voters may seem foolhardy in hindsight, but these voters have not been a key Democratic demographic for many decades. Moreover, as a longtime member of the Washington establishment, Clinton was always going to be a hard sell to these voters in a change election.

    The voters Clinton really lost—the ones she was targeting and relying on for victory—were college-educated whites. Most polling suggested she would win these voters, but she didn’t, according to exit polls: White men went 63 percent for Trump versus 31 percent for Clinton, and white women went 53-43 percent. Among college-educated whites, only 39 percent of men and 51 percent of women voted for Clinton.

    Clinton’s strategy made sense. Trump’s negatives among this group, which normally leans Republican (Romney won them by six points), were pretty high in polling. What’s more, these people hadn’t suffered under Obama; they’d thrived. The kind of change Trump was espousing wasn’t supposed to connect with this group. A massive Gallup study in August revealed that the typical Trump supporter has “not been disproportionately affected by foreign trade or immigration. The results suggest that his supporters, on average, do not have lower incomes than other Americans, nor are they more likely to be unemployed.”

    Perhaps, then, these Trump voters are the most deplorable of them all. They’re not suffering or desperate, and have no concrete reason to hate the status quo or to feel like they are in decline. They understand that Trump is manifestly unprepared to be president, have heard his many lies and insults, yet voted for him anyway. And without them, Trump wouldn’t have won. The media ought to focus on their motivations, too—and reporters won’t even have to fly to Youngstown to find them.

  896. Tgca says:

    Both VA and AL were about the candidates and not Trump. They failed to turn out the vote and get the same level of support Trump did.

    You can’t have it both ways where GOP won earlier races this year. You always must start with the candidate and how they are perceived by their local electorate 1st before trying to subscribe any vast predictions.

  897. CG says:

    So, how we have a plagiarist… Where is that from? Remember, poster Trump was predicting his namesake would lose in a landslide and he was planning to enjoy that carnage.

    Trump did far worse among college educated whites than Republicans typically do and better among the least educated.

  898. CG says:

    Trump definitely motivated a large Democrat turnout in VA and AL by being so vocal about those races in the closing days. In that regard, he is very much responsible.

  899. Trump says:

    Keep spreading lies. Served you well, hasn’t it?

  900. Wes says:

    Alabama was clearly about Moore, Tg.

    Given the clear antipathy toward Trump in NoVA though, I have to strongly disagree about the results there. It was a clear backlash against a sitting President.

    Roy Moore was known as the worst example of an ALGOP pol though. His defeat is on his own head. Trump was right to distance himself from Moore early on.

    I hope Kay Ivey falls in the primary because of her part in this next year.

  901. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 13, 2017 at 3:44 pm
    Roger Stone? The man who wrote The Man Who Killed Kennedy: The case against LBJ?
    Robbie thinks this is significant? A reach even for him.

    – Talk to Trump. He’s the one who still consults Stone for advice from time to time.

  902. CG says:

    I don’t know what the crux of Stone’s book is, but he has been with Trump politically since 1987, and as of last week, was his staunchest defender. I doubt he has truly turned on Trump.

  903. Robbie says:

    Stone is using the supposed book he’s writing as a flare to shoot into the night sky to get Trump’s attention and the attention of MAGA world. Basically, he’s trying to tell Trump there are enemies all around him and the only way to save himself is to listen to Roger.

  904. CG says:

    What happened to Jonestown Jones? Where has he been? I guess he might resurface one day with a new J name.

  905. CG says:

    Has Trump appeared in public today?

  906. Robbie says:

    Yeah. What happened to Jonesy? Is he on a vacation somewhere?

  907. CG says:

    He might have gone on the InfoWars Cruise to the Bermuda Triangle.

  908. NYCmike says:

    Still no answer:

    WHY DIDN’T THEY send him those same bills vetoed by Obama?

  909. CG says:

    For those who like to take solace in Trump’s conservative nominations, he has recently selected Jeb Bush’s Lt. Governor to be Assistant Secretary of Education.

    The entire DeVos Education Department is said to be pretty heavily populated with Jeb loyalists.

  910. CG says:

    You’ve gotten your answer before, the bills Obama vetoed did not include a replacement for Obamacare. Trump campaigned on and insisted that the replacement was mandatory and would be easy to do.

  911. TrumpIsPeteWilson says:

    Moore Accuser Beverly Nelson Has Solid Defamation Case Against Fox News and Breitbart

    http://lawandcrime.com/legal-analysis/moore-accuser-beverly-nelson-has-solid-defamation-case-against-fox-news-and-breitbart/

    “The Fox News headline mimicked alt-right media outlets Breitbart and The Gateway Pundit.

    “The author(s) of the original Fox News article seemed to understand they were padding the facts; the story was initially published without attribution. That story–and Fox News‘ erroneous and misleading take on it–quickly rose to the rafters of rightwing media sharing-and-consumption and easily trended to the top of Fox News‘ own website.

    “False accusations of criminality rising to the level of defamation can, of course, be mitigated by retractions. Fox News issued one–again, hours later, but neither Breitbart nor The Gateway Pundit have yet to correct their stories and likely will not do so.

    ***********************

    But what will degenerates like Tina and Janz post if they can’t post lies from their favorite sites?

  912. NYCmike says:

    The Freedom Caucus would NOT have been the problem, they would have voted for those same bills vetoed by Obama.

    Which “principled”, “long-time-Republicans” would NOT HAVE VOTED for those same bills?

  913. Robbie says:

    The story about Omarosa getting fired by Kelly, storming the residence, and then being hauled off by the Secret Service is so Trumpian.

  914. Wes says:

    Why didn’t Roy Moore win so those aggrieved women could get justice, Mikey?

    Still no answer.

  915. NYCmike says:

    “Trump campaigned on and insisted that the replacement was mandatory and would be easy to do.”

    -So, now Congress is listening to Trump?

    Amazing how that happens……

  916. CG says:

    It was good of janz to coin the “Roy Moore is like Jack Bauer” comparison. He can use that in his next race.

  917. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    912. “Trump definitely motivated a large Democrat turnout in VA and AL by being so vocal about those races in the closing days. In that regard, he is very much responsible.”

    Trump also campaigned in the Republican congressional elections, and you can claim motivated the Republican turnout. So he could claim responsibility there to.

    You can shill this anyway you want, but the local politics and quality of the candidates are what mostly matters. Trump likely can motive voters on both sides to turn out.

  918. NYCmike says:

    Wes,

    Not sure what you are getting at.

    Moore lost, and now those women will never be heard from again, and people like “CG” and Robbie, who claim they are so credible, will not mention them again either.

  919. CG says:

    He was kept at arm’s length in those House races. Never stepped foot in those districts. Karen Handel would never mention his name, in the only district that was competitive, and she won there by a much wider margin than Trump did.

    In any event, politics is about what happened lately, and Trump has suffered tremendous losses by getting involved so personally in VA and AL.

  920. Wes says:

    You told us Moore HAD to win so his accusers could have justice, Mikey.

    What happened? Will they not get justice now that Moore will serve exactly as long in the Senate as you did in Iraq?

  921. NYCmike says:

    Amazing how such “credible allegations” will just be swept away by such caring men like Robbie and “CG”.

  922. CG says:

    I will mention them again. Roy Moore should have to answer for the crimes he committed against them. Perhaps he will one day, one way or another.

  923. messy says:

    932. Why should they? The abuse happened to long ago to be prosecuted and Moore will never get elected to anything again.

    Although I hope the defamation case against Fox goes forward….

  924. NYCmike says:

    “You told us Moore HAD to win so his accusers could have justice, Mikey.”

    -I did….and I am exactly correct.

    Those allegations will never be spoken of again. How have those women received justice? Their “tormentor” is still free to live his life, just not in DC.

  925. CG says:

    but if it truth about his past prevented him from winning an election, it’s a good thing.

    Now, his political career should be over for good.

  926. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 13, 2017 at 4:28 pm

    Trump also campaigned in the Republican congressional elections, and you can claim motivated the Republican turnout. So he could claim responsibility there to.

    – A boatload of crazy has happened since April and May when those special elections occurred. Trump is far more disliked/hated by people today then he was 7 months ago. A lot has happened to make people want to show up to vote against Trump.

  927. CG says:

    I don’t recall any of his accusers (who were mostly Trump voters) say that they demanded he be locked up. They wanted to prevent him from winning a Senate seat and they won that fight. Good for them and good for the Democrat women who were abused by Al Franken and stood up too.

  928. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 13, 2017 at 4:31 pm
    Amazing how such “credible allegations” will just be swept away by such caring men like Robbie and “CG

    – I believe the woman who claimed Moore assaulted them. I hope they sue him.

  929. Cash Cow TM says:

    Wisdom From The Cow Pasture

    1. Far more men than women like DJT’s abrasive “style”. More women find DJT’s MOA (and past history) repulsive and boorish. Comes cross as anti-woman. And DJT is dumb as a fence post in his ability to explain what he believes/stands for…

    Many women DID vote for DJT because HRC was so despised and had a train load of baggage from NY to LA. They did not vote FOR DJT…they held their noses and voted for him because he was not Hillary.

    Of course the mentally deranged, narcissistic, egomaniac DJT reads this as “even the women love me.”

    2. If there was an election last November with just DJT on the ballot and options YES or NO do you want this person to lead this country for the next 4 years–DJT would have not gotten 50+%.

    If there was an election with just HRC on the ballot and options YES or NO….HRC would not have gotten 50+%

    3. Far more men than women follow the details of the twists and turns of the Roy Moore allegations. To many women, they heard the original allegations, made their mind up that the allegations were 100% meritorious and became non-Moore voters. Women particularly do not buy the argument that “you have to vote for Moore because he will vote conservative and advance DJT’s/R congressional agenda” plus “Jones is a typical liberal moonbat” (which he is). Perceived creepy scumbag overrides political ideology. Does not make any difference to many women that some of the 40 year old creepy charges have been discredited. The political damage was done. (which is why you will see LOTS more of these charges coming from the Left/D against R candidates).

    3. DJT goes out of his way to be a very divisive person and president. Cannot think of any president that consistently does and says things so divisive. [Even BHO (as far left and goofy as he was) at least pretended to be sincere about uniting the country.] Yes, it is good to see someone “take it to the liberal press”, etc. But people are getting Trump fatigue and DJT bullying of everyone and attacking everyone…R or D.

    4. Some people (even on here?) who lined up behind DJT

  930. CG says:

    In the case of Karen Handel, the only marginal district race, enough voters were able to separate her and her record from Trump, whom she never even mentioned. She got a bunch of Hillary voters to vote for her.

    After Virginia though, we have seen that voters are motivated to hold any Republican responsible for Trump and that is going to be a problem anywhere where he is not highly supported.

  931. CG says:

    He didn’t get close to 50 % even against Hillary.

  932. Robbie says:

    Cash Cow TM just killed it. Absolutely right on every count.

  933. Wes says:

    I agree wholeheartedly with what Walt said in 943.

  934. NYCmike says:

    ” I hope they sue him.”

    -I hope so as well.

    Otherwise, it will go down as just another cheap ploy by Democrats and squish Republicans who didn’t want him in the Senate and did anything necessary to smear his name.

    And, it will probably be used again in the future, against someone that you will have voted for.

  935. CG says:

    I wanted to hear the conclusion to point # 4

    (at least he got one further than Rick Perry could have)

  936. CG says:

    The allegations didn’t seem credible to you NYC?

    I don’t remember all the back and forth, but wasn’t there an issue from a couple years ago where you dismissed the notion of statutory rape in general?

  937. NYCmike says:

    “And DJT is dumb as a fence post in his ability to explain what he believes/stands for…”

    -He stands for himself.

    THIS IS EXACTLY WHY the same bills that Obama vetoed should have been sent to Trump, he would have signed them, no questions asked.

    Of course, the same people who voted for them when Obama was President – could it be they just wanted to look like conservative Republicans to get re-elected…..?

  938. Wes says:

    Much as I hate to see Republicans lose a Senate seat, I’m glad Elmer Gantry will see his dream of American throcracy unfulfilled.

  939. CG says:

    If anybody I have or would ever vote for was ever a child predator, I would like to know too, so I nor anyone else ever vote for them again.

    I believe there are more than enough non-child predators (on both sides of the aisle) to take their places.

  940. NYCmike says:

    “I don’t remember all the back and forth, but wasn’t there an issue from a couple years ago where you dismissed the notion of statutory rape in general?”

    -No. It came up in a specific context.

    Next question.

  941. Cash Cow TM says:

    4. Some people (even on here?) who lined up behind DJT DURING THE ELECTION CAMPAIGN and defended him in every instance have not switched gear and put the 2016 election behind them.

    DJT needs to switch from campaign mode to presidential mode, lead the nation, unite the nation mode.

    Supporters of DJT (including those here?) during the campaign need to switch out of campaign mode as well. As candidate, DJT made few mistakes–at least not enough to lose. As president he is making a lot of mistakes and too many people are making excuses for him instead of calling him to task to shift.

  942. CG says:

    What was the context? What was it you said? I don’t remember the back and forth but I know people were calling you all sorts of names over it, that was perhaps unfair, but I don’t know what you said. The way you laugh off what Moore did is concerning though.

  943. CG says:

    Point 4 is good. I credit Mrs. Cow.

  944. NYCmike says:

    Ca$h,

    Is it out of the realm of possibility that if Congress had sent Trump the same bills as were sent to Obama, which Obama vetoed, and Trump signed them last Feb/March/April, that the political landscape would be DRASTICALLY different?

  945. Cash Cow TM says:

    is it “all about the base”?

    Or is it “all about the pivot”?
    (shift from campaign mode to governing mode)
    **********************************************
    The left wing loons have taken control of the d party and now the right wing loons are doing the same in the R party?

  946. NYCmike says:

    “The way you laugh off what Moore did is concerning though.”

    -Laugh off?

    Where are the women who made the allegations? Are you asking about them?

    No, you are not. You are only here to make fun of Moore.

    MAYBE he was guilty. MAYBE he was NOT GUILTY.

    You DO NOT CARE. You just wanted him defeated.

  947. mnw says:

    Troll say:

    Trump not sink Handel; Handel special!

    Trump sink Moore: Moore typical!

  948. Robbie says:

    Cash Cow TM scored again with Point 4.

  949. CG says:

    What is there to ask them? Their allegations are credible just like the allegations that are often made about people you don’t like politically, and Mr. Ten Commandments wouldn’t swear on a Bible that he was innocent.

  950. NYCmike says:

    “The left wing loons have taken control of the d party and now the right wing loons are doing the same in the R party?”

    -If “right wing loons” had control of the party, the Obamacare Repeal bill would have been on Trump’s desk on Jan 21st.

    And the last 11 months could have been arguing over the best free-market policies to help lower health insurance costs for the majority of citizens, while seeking a remedy for the perplexing issue of long-term, debilitating illnesses that bankrupt people.

  951. CG says:

    The difference of course is that Handel never mentioned Trump’s name and support of Trump was the #1 thing pushed by Moore.

  952. NYCmike says:

    “Their allegations are credible just like the allegations that are often made about people you don’t like politically”

    -Please name the politician I don’t like politically who I said should leave without having a chance to prove himself.

  953. NYCmike says:

    Did I call for Menendez to be removed?

  954. CG says:

    Ok, so maybe you are just ok with the actions in general? What was that thing you said on here that you think you were unfairly maligned for?

  955. CG says:

    You said that Hillary belongs in prison. Did she get a chance to prove herself in court?

  956. Proud Obamacon says:

    I’m worried about Janz. I hope she’s ok!

  957. Robbie says:

    CG says:
    December 13, 2017 at 4:55 pm
    You said that Hillary belongs in prison. Did she get a chance to prove herself in court?

    – Now, now. You know the answer to that question. The determination of who gets due process and who doesn’t has everything to do with whether a person has a R or a D next to their name.

  958. CG says:

    janz will be fine. She has her Donald Trump is the moral equivalent of the Founding Fathers and Roy Moore is a leader like Jack Bauer action figures.

  959. Cash Cow TM says:

    NYC,

    IDK.

    I know it was disappointing that many r congresscritters in House and Senate got cold feet when confronted with the spin given by the left and press.

    The Rs did a horrible job of explaining what dire and unsustainable shape ObamaCare was in, how it harms the country, and how those who will “lose Obamacare” will still be able to get medical care like they did before Obamacare, having nothing ready and presentable to replace Obamacare, etc., etc.

  960. CG says:

    unless its an R that NYC doesn’t like. Then, it’s to hell with them too.

  961. Proud Obamacon says:

    OK but Janz vehemently defended Al Franken. Got me worried, maybe off her meds?

  962. Waingro says:

    Boom.

    Senate Periodicals?Verified account @SenatePPG
    2m2 minutes ago

    #Senate CONFIRMED the nomination of Don R. Willett to be a United States Circuit Judge for the Fifth Circuit by a vote of 50-47.
    0 replies 2 retweets 1 like

  963. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    972. “I will mention them again. Roy Moore should have to answer for the crimes he committed against them.”

    Isn’t this the same type of assumption of guilt?

  964. CG says:

    The people on the right who defended Franken were likely just engaging in diversionary tactics to make Roy Moore (and Trump) less bad.

  965. CG says:

    978. The entire point of that was that if he is innocent, the Lord will know.

  966. Cash Cow TM says:

    The “comparisons” of DJT to the founding fathers is ludicrous.
    They had core beliefs, they got things done.

    Same for comparing DJT to Reagan.

    Same for comparing the current bunch of right wing loons to the founding fathers. In their minds, they THINK they are the reborn version of the patriots who stood against the British at Lexington. But they are not.

  967. CG says:

    But there is nothing wrong with me assuming guilt as an observer of the news. I have not taken an oath as a Juror to be impartial during proceedings.

    We all do it, every day of our lives. I just think it should be consistent regardless of political machinations.

  968. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    940. “– A boatload of crazy has happened since April and May when those special elections occurred. Trump is far more disliked/hated by people today then he was 7 months ago. A lot has happened to make people want to show up to vote against Trump.”

    You just cannot help making this stuff up. Do you believe Moore would have won early this year, or the year before, but not now because of Trump lost?

  969. CG says:

    That’s not even close to what Robbie said.

  970. Robbie says:

    NYCmike pumps his fist in the air.

    Sam R. Hall?
    @samrhall

    UPDATE: Sen. Chris McDaniel says #ALsen was an anomaly, defends Steve Bannon saying he inherited a mess and still got an accused pedophile within 1.5 percentage points of winning. (Better get ready for #MSSEN 2018!)

  971. mnw says:

    966

    The difference “of course” is that Handel destroys your simplistic, kindergarten narrative! That’s the only difference “of course.” Ossoff ran against Trump, not Handel, and spent $20 million calling Trump 50 kinds of a*****e. Forgot that, did you?

    One last thing: you’re so full of skit it’s squirting out of every orifice you have “of course.”

    And one last point: FU, FU, & FU particularly.

  972. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 13, 2017 at 5:07 pm
    940. “– A boatload of crazy has happened since April and May when those special elections occurred. Trump is far more disliked/hated by people today then he was 7 months ago. A lot has happened to make people want to show up to vote against Trump.”
    You just cannot help making this stuff up. Do you believe Moore would have won early this year, or the year before, but not now because of Trump lost?

    – Your desire to misrepresent what I wrote is something.

    How Trump was viewed by the public during those special elections in April and May is very different from how he is viewed by the public seven months later. He is far more disliked now and people are actually voting to take stand against him.

  973. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    982. “But there is nothing wrong with me assuming guilt as an observer of the news. I have not taken an oath as a Juror to be impartial during proceedings.

    We all do it, every day of our lives. I just think it should be consistent regardless of political machinations.”

    I might phrase it differently. There is no right to serve in a political office; if there appears to be serious questions about a candidate’s past conduct, the candidate should withdraw from the race, resolve the issue, and run at a later time.

    If the candidate can make a satisfactory explanation the allegations are false, he can stay in the race. Moore never gave a satisfactory explanation. if anything his answers raised more questions. T

  974. CG says:

    Actually, Ossoff was criticized heavily by the left for not talking about Trump.

  975. CG says:

    No wonder the St. Louis Blues are such historic losers.

  976. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    987. “He is far more disliked now and people are actually voting to take stand against him.”

    You indicated that dislike of Trump was a reason that many people voted against Moore, and contributed to his defeat. I believe Moore was such a fatally flawed candidate he would have lost regardless. If Strange was a candidate, he would have likely won despite Trump.

  977. CG says:

    In a two percent race, lots of factors could have made the difference. Trump’s numbers in AL, after winning by 26 points was 48/48 in this electorate. Obviously, he has fallen off in influence.

    Virginia is a more tangible example though.

  978. CG says:

    Strange would have won of course but not by a typical AL Republican federal margin. Distaste over his appointment by Bentley would have played a role plus his lapdog approach to Trump.

  979. CG says:

    Just as a reminder, Ossoff’s strategy was to deliberately avoid running against Trump. Thus the race was more of a traditional liberal vs. conservative contest.

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/06/politics/jon-ossoff-karen-handel-georgia-debate/index.html

    Jones really didn’t run against Trump either, but that’s just common sense with Moore’s problems.

  980. Robbie says:

    I indicated that Trump’s unpopularity almost certainly juiced turnout among Democrats, especially blacks, and that may have been the difference between a slight Moore win and the loss he had.

    The fact the race was even remotely competitive is a function of Moore being an idiot.

  981. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    989. Trump was heavily twittering away in the Georgia special election.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/georgia-special-election-latest-donald-trump-jon-ossoff-twitter-attack-congressional-district-a7799121.html

    The Democrats, after losing the Georgia seat, went through the same catharsis that the Republicans are going to go through now. They seemed to have learned from it. Will see if the Republicans also do. What is for sure, Bannon is a problem and he needs to be repudiated.

    Agree with Cow, it is time for Trump to act presidential. Some were hoping that would happen when Bannon was tossed, and Kelly became chief of staff. Maybe Alabama will serve as a needed reality check.

  982. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    992. “Trump’s numbers in AL, after winning by 26 points was 48/48 in this electorate.”

    Believe these were from voters who actually turned out to vote. A substantial amount of Republicans stayed at home. Agree Virginia was a better tangible example.

  983. CG says:

    He is incapable of acting Presidential.

    He can’t even act like a Township Dogcatcher.

  984. CG says:

    And that doesn’t bode well for 2018 across the board unless GOP candidates separate themselves from Trump.

    The Dems will be turning out in a big way.

  985. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    995. “The fact the race was even remotely competitive is a function of Moore being an idiot.”

    Good grief, we agree again. My impression is African-Americans were especially motivated by Moore coming across as some sort of Confederate leftover from the past. He had the George Wallae/Lester Maddox quality.

  986. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    999. “And that doesn’t bode well for 2018 across the board unless GOP candidates separate themselves from Trump.”

    At this point, would be the best advice. You saw it already happen in Utah. Believe the election yesterday sunk any idea of Hatch running for re-election. Romney will probably win the seat with over 70% of the vote.

  987. CG says:

    All things considered, if Trump would have just said, “he should get out of the race but its up to the voters. I am not focused on the race anymore” and no more that that, Moore probably ekes out a narrow win. Trump tweeting and campaigning revved up the Dem vote though.

    McConnell will take Moore losing anyway he can though.

  988. Hugh says:

    If trump could act presidential we would see it. He can’t. I like unorthodox but he is a complete as s. Which is unfortunate because if he had a little self control he would be very effective and popular enough. The gop should brace itself we could have 3% plus growth and get routed next year. I thought Moore would win. his losing is an omen. Even without the creepiness he would have won with relatively low margins for AL. Our party is a fractured mess. The other side is fractured but has the press and has party discipline

  989. CG says:

    Romney looks way better on a horse too.

  990. Hugh says:

    999. I wish it was that easy if you run from trump you lose his voters you embrace him and you lose blocks of the gop who will sit home. Our best chance is a heart attack. And sadly I mean it and would not lose any sleep over it.

  991. NYCmike says:

    https://pjmedia.com/trending/google-friendly-sex-trafficking-bill-moves-house-judiciary-committee/

    -Money talks, sex-trafficking pays, Goodlatte walks down to K-Street for a lobbying job.

  992. NYCmike says:

    https://pjmedia.com/trending/conservative-student-group-defunded-hosting-dennis-prager/

    -No reason to fight institutions like the press and liberal universities…….

  993. Robbie says:

    Special elections aside (they are unique), I think it’s going to be very difficult for Republicans to separate themselves from Trump in a midterm election. Republicans are going to have to carry Trump’s popularity or unpopularity on their backs. That’s just the way it works. Ask Democrats in 1994, Republicans in 2006, and Democrats again in 2010 and 2014.

    The ONLY way Republicans can separate themselves from Trump is to call for his resignation or impeach and remove him and they are not going to do that.

  994. Robbie says:

    For soccer idiot.

    Josh Kraushaar?
    @HotlineJosh

    Jones got *more* total votes than Clinton // Moore with less than half of Trump’s total. Supercharged D base + apathetic Rs in the burbs.

  995. NYCmike says:

    Sheeple,

    Trump picking judges, a competent Cabinet, getting rid of burdensome regulations…you know, items that the Executive Branch is supposed to do….do not matter…..because he hasn’t written legislation, passed it, and signed it into law.

    Don’t you know that President Trump is able to do everything, but is too incompetent?!?

  996. Sheeple, Jr. says:

    #1010
    Robbie, please note that this was in one County,Shelby, which is a suburb of Birmingham.

  997. Tina says:

    Poor rosenstein,

    Way to go house rs.

  998. Tina says:

    What did pete the cheat and the mistress mean by insurance policynagainst trump in andys office?

  999. Tina says:

    Jim Jordan makes rosenstein look feeble.

    Ugly feeble man.

  1000. Phil says:

    1003

    Reluctantly, agree with the totality of Hugh’s post.

    Total truth from top to bottom.

  1001. Phil says:

    1014

    In the end, Tina, we are going to find out and it won’t be pretty.

  1002. Tina says:

    Our party is not a mess. We have mitchie and ryano.

  1003. Tina says:

    Yes, it is the big ugly, phil. This was an fbi coup. Wheter comedy knew or not, he was in charge.

    Comedy oaid for the dossier.

  1004. Tina says:

    Andy Mccarthy was hesitant to attack pete the cheat, but now agress that the insurance policy comment is huge.

    And its leak, leak. Leak,

    Mulehead will shut down.

  1005. NYCmike says:

    “Is it going to be one-and-done for the GOP controlling both houses of Congress plus the White House? Salena Zito — one of the first national reporters to take the Trump wave seriously back in 2015 — hears some dangerous rumbles in her native Pennsylvania, where Republicans “found themselves on the wrong side of voter sentiment.”

    She writes, “there wasn’t a big anti-Trump backlash here,” but warns that “it is easy to imagine congressional seats in Bucks, Chester, and the Lehigh Valley becoming very vulnerable in six months if Congress doesn’t accomplish something.” Most ominously, Zito concludes: “If there are signs that is happening here, then it’s also happening in Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin.” That’s the heart of Trump Country, and if — if — voters there are getting frustrated, it’s not a good sign for the GOP Congressional majority.

    For some additional perspective, there was talk in 2015-2016 that the GOP might be able to take a 60-seat supermajority in the Senate in 2018. There are a lot of vulnerable Dems in a lot of Red states — which ought to be a recipe for big wins. But it’s been months since I’ve heard any serious talk about that supermajority.

    Early this year, I took some serious heat in the comments section at Instapundit, for having dared to admit that I’d been working under the assumption that the GOP would lose its House majority next year. There might have been some confusion, because “working under the assumption” doesn’t necessarily mean you believe that something is going to happen, but that the safe bet is to plan and behave as though it might.

    That’s what the Democrats did in 2009-2011, when they held all of Capitol Hill and the White House. They pushed through everything they really wanted (ObamaCare, Dodd-Frank, etc.), even when the polls told them it wasn’t what the voters wanted. In that, the Democratic leadership was very, very smart. They were willing to use their vulnerable Congresscritters as cannon fodder, confident that having Obama in the White House would protect their legislative gains even if they lost their majority.

    They did indeed lose their majority. But what they really wanted — much bigger government — they kept.

    So I really wish the GOP were acting under the assumption that they’ll lose their majority in Congress next year. Because if they did, they might be more serious about chalking up the legislative wins they promised their constituents.

    The irony is, unlike the Democrats in 2010, if the GOP were to take my advice and vote as though they’ve got nothing to lose, they’d be more likely to keep their majority. But as things stand now, there’s an awful lot of well-earned “meh” sentiment for this Republican Congress, and Democrats showed in Virginia and Pennsylvania that at the local level, they’re learning the lessons of 2016.

    So what will happen on November 6, 2018? Hell if I know. But I sure know what I’d like to see happen on Capitol Hill between now and then.”

  1006. NYCmike says:

    Key part:

    “The irony is, unlike the Democrats in 2010, if the GOP were to take my advice and vote as though they’ve got nothing to lose, they’d be more likely to keep their majority. But as things stand now, there’s an awful lot of well-earned “meh” sentiment for this Republican Congress, and Democrats showed in Virginia and Pennsylvania that at the local level, they’re learning the lessons of 2016.”

  1007. NYCmike says:

    Stephen Green wrote that (Instapundit)….of course, it would have been much better to have acted BOLDLY in January, February, March, April…..that dang Trump didn’t write any legislation though!

  1008. Trump says:

    “Robbie says:
    December 13, 2017 at 6:11 pm

    For soccer idiot.

    Josh Kraushaar?
    @HotlineJosh

    Jones got *more* total votes than Clinton // Moore with less than half of Trump’s total. Supercharged D base + apathetic Rs in the burbs.”

    Hey retarded as*wipe Robbie, this is what you consider proof of Trump’s supposed weakness in the suburbs? Does you mother feed you arsenic with milk?

    Fu*cking as*wipe, Trump is not on the ballot, retard.

    What was Trump’s performance in the Birmingham suburbs when he was actually on the ballot?

  1009. Trump says:

    When you tghink the cretin Robbie has hit bottom of retardness, he comes up with this doozy.

  1010. Trump says:

    Maybe the retard can worry about how losers like Ed Gilles[pie can’t get their own mothers to vote for them.

  1011. Redmen4ever says:

    888

    Roger Stone says LBJ assassinated Kennedy, when we know, per Donald Trump, it was Ted Cruz’ father.

  1012. Flaelectionwatcher says:

    Possible law suit to invalidate AL election
    Every Al ballot had a straight party option plus the names of the two Us Senate candidates. Election officials said that if someone voted straight party Republican and then contradicted it by voting for Democrat Jones that the vote for Jones would count or vice versa for Moore. This incompetent way of creating a ballot must have led to much voter confusion as hundreds of thousands of voters voted the straight party ballot. Unfortunately due to the lack of transparency by elections officials we do not know how these straight party voters voted when they voted for the candidates. This is grounds for a good law suit.
    The AL elections officials are known for their lack of transparency with precinct results which very few counties post. The state officials have the precinct results for this years elections but usually wait for more than a year before posting them.
    If the Moore campaign thought like Democrats this law suit would already be filed and they would be asking to look at the over one million ballot images (which have been saved) to see how many voters contradicted their vote as well as possibly invalidating their ballot.

  1013. Paul says:

    An Evangelical Spiritual Advisor for Donald Trump is going to jump in the race against Cruz. Maybe the primary voters can make a statement by getting rid of establishment Cruz.

  1014. Phil says:

    Yeah, that will happen.

  1015. Trump says:

    Speaking of loser Ed Gillespie, here’s his performance vis a vis Trump in NoVa suburbs:

    Arlington County: G -61, T -60
    Fairfax County: G -37, T -35
    Alexandria City: G -57, T-54
    Fairfax City: G-31, T-30
    Loudon County: G -20, T -17

    Even in his backyard, Gillespie did marginally worse than Trump.

    And candidates like Gillespie are supposed to “appeal” in NoVa environment.

    Of course, he did much worse than Trump in non-NoVa areas.

  1016. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    Senator Ron Johnson on Moore’s loss:

    “Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) did not mince words when asked to comment on Tuesday night’s election results in Alabama. When asked what he believed the “message” from last night was, Johnson said that “Alabamians didn’t want somebody who dated 14-year-old girls.”

    He then said that Steve Bannon should learn that the GOP needs better candidates in order to win Senate races before going into an office away from the camera.”

    Again, over the long-term people will look back and see Moore’s loss as a benefit to Republicans.

    Also, believe the Republicans will hold the Senate in 2018, and it is much too early to write-off Heller.

  1017. Hugh says:

    1032. If trump wasn’t such an as s gillispie would have done better than trump. In every race even the ones we win we under perform.

  1018. Trump says:

    Nothing in evidence suggests that.

    Trump gets X, Gillespie gets X-Y (where both X and Y are positive integers).

    All data suggests that Trump does better than Gillespie by getting both his own base and some of Gillespie’s base, whereas Gillespie cannot get even his own base, let alone Trump’s.

    But if it makes you feel better, sure.

  1019. Trump says:

    The facts argue that it is Gillespie who is more of an as*, not Trump.

  1020. Trump says:

    “In every race even the ones we win we under perform.”

    that’s because you are not running trump in every race.

  1021. Trump says:

    it also argues for the notion that many who came out to vote for trump are not coming out to vote for lesser candidates.

  1022. Trump says:

    just like many who came out to vote for obama did not turn up for lesser dems, including hillary.

  1023. mnw says:

    Trump did everything he could for Strange & then pivoted and did everything he could for Moore. I suspect GOP congress members will note that & appreciate it. Before his inauguration, there was worry he wouldn’t extend himself like that for other Republicans.

    I can NOT let go of the willful stupidity of those trolls here who are braying that Moore’s loss has predictive significance. Of course it DOES… but only for GOP nominees mired in sex allegations.

    McCain back in hospital again tonight…

  1024. Tina says:

    They need to pass the tax cut bill quickly. Move ryano and mitchie. Do phuqin something.

  1025. Sheeple, Jr. says:

    DW
    How about a new List of bad boys’ sexual misbehavior? Start with Tavis Smiley.

    http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/tavis-smiley-pbs-1202639424/

  1026. Tina says:

    I thougt comedysaid the fiwasfair ad opartisan. What did peter meanyhavinganinsurancepolicyagaist trump.

    Bigugly is set….

  1027. TrumpIsPeteWilson says:

    April Ryan: Omarosa fired by Kelly, escorted out of White House

    http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/364729-april-ryan-omarosa-fired-by-kelly-escorted-out-of-white-house

    Not the first time Omarosa has been fired and certainly not the last.

  1028. Tina says:

    Maybe an insurance policy was a weaponized fbi?

  1029. Tina says:

    She was not escorted out though. No leos involved.

    I cannot stand omarossa, but facts are facts.

  1030. NYCmike says:

    Committed suicide 3X!?!?

    That is one thorough person!*

    *Leaves behind a wife, kids, grandkids….lots of heartache to go around.

  1031. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    1039. “it also argues for the notion that many who came out to vote for trump are not coming out to vote for lesser candidates.”

    Agree. Every candidate has to stand on their own feet politically. While Obama was in office, the Democrats lost a massive amount of congressional seats, and lost both houses.

  1032. NYCmike says:

    http://reason.com/blog/2017/12/12/federal-sex-ad-ban-passes-judiciary

    -If government gets involved, bad things happen…..but as long as they look good on a horse…..

  1033. Sheeple, Jr. says:

    Winning!!!
    The Senate just invoked cloture on James Ho’s nomination to the Fifth Circuit by a vote of 53-44 (Donnelly, Heitkamp and surprisingly McCaskill all voted yea and surprisingly Manchin voted nay). He’ll likely be confirmed tomorrow, making it President Trump’s 12th circuit court confirmation.

  1034. DW says:

    oh wow…one of the names on the list offed himself…check Drudge.

  1035. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    Republicans – “Roy Moore Who?” AP

    “A semi-humbled President Donald Trump conceded that Roy Moore’s loss was not his preferred outcome. He said he “would have liked to have had the seat” and an important Senate vote as he and GOP lawmakers scratch for legislative victories.
    But he also acknowledged, “A lot of Republicans feel differently. They feel very happy about the way it turned out.”
    Indeed, it was easy to find establishment-minded Republicans — in and out of Washington — who cheered Moore’s loss as the impact of the Alabama stunner echoed throughout the political world. The prospect of a high-profile Republican senator dogged by sexual misconduct accusations — and an all-but-certain ethics investigation — unnerved a GOP that’s fearful of an albatross on its candidates in next year’s campaigns.
    Republican Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby said that Moore, a fiery conservative, would have brought a “radioactive” element to the Senate GOP.
    “I’m relieved and I believe a lot of Republicans are relieved that Roy Moore and some of his people aren’t the face of the Republican Party that I know,” said Shelby, who cast a write-in vote for another Republican and never backed down in his opposition to Moore.”

  1036. Paul says:

    Suicide note from Johnson on Facebook. Very sad. :

    “The accusations from NPR are false GOD and only GOD knows the truth, nothing is the way they make it out to be. AMERICA will not survive this type of judge and jury fake news . Conservatives take a stand. I LOVE GOD and I LOVE MY WIFE, who is the best WIFE in the world,My Love Forever ! My Mom and Dad my FAMILY and all five of my kids and Nine grandchildren two in tummies and many more to come each of you or a total gift from GOD stay strong, REBECCA needs YOU . 9-11-2001 NYC/WTC, PTSD 24/7 16 years is a sickness that will take my life, I cannot handle it any longer. IT Has Won This Life . BUT HEAVEN IS MY HOME. “PLEASE LISTEN CLOSELY, Only Three things I ask of you to do,if you love me is (1)blame no person,Satan is the accuser, so blame the Devil himself. (2) Forgive and Love everyone especially yourself .(3)most importantly LOVE GOD. P.S. I LOVE MY FRIENDS YOU ARE FAMILY ! GOD LOVES ALL PEOPLE NO MATTER WHAT !”

  1037. NYCmike says:

    Sheeple posted it 3x, then DW mentioned it, then Paul does it again….why so much care for a child predator?*

    *using the Robbie/”CG” reasoning that allegations are facts.

  1038. Paul says:

    No matter what one is accused of and regardless of whether they are guilty or innocent, they are first and foremost fellow children of God.

  1039. Paul says:

    I would feel some sadness if Roy Moore committed suicide even though I do believe the evidence points toward him being a predator of teenage girls.

  1040. Wes says:

    Mikey, why do Deadenders never concede voters don’t want them in office? As a big booster of Chris McDaniel, you should be able to answer this, I figure.

  1041. Hugh says:

    Suicide is so very sad and no path to god. I am sure many times mental illness is a factor. Way too many men commit suicide but since it’s mostly men no one cares. Very sad and often very selfish.

  1042. lisab says:

    the allegations against johnson were both more recent and more believable than the one’s against moore

    they of course may not have been true

    but he was accused of groping a 17 year old while she was at a sleepover at his house

    again, in no way saying the allegations were true, just that they are both recent and typical of such behavior by molesters.

    unfortunately, now true or not everyone involved will be scarred, including his family and the alleged victim — even if she is telling the truth she will feel terrible over this result i am sure

  1043. Tina says:

    I wonder if pete and his mistress read this blog in 2016?

  1044. Walt says:

    1066…1067…1068…

    I remember them well.
    They were all good years…

  1045. Bitterlaw says:

    Weak guy kills himself. Selfish. All he did was make himself look guilty. Why should I feel sorry for his family when he did not?

  1046. Bitterlaw says:

    Walt still wants to party like it’s 999.

  1047. Cash Cow TM says:

    Good morning…
    and good night, to all my MOO-chachos.

  1048. janz says:

    Bitter, that was a tough way to look suicide.

    Sure, suicide may be a quick detour away from what someone sees as overwhelming odds. However it’s, nevertheless, a tragic event for not only those left behind, but also for those who decided to leave too soon.

  1049. janz says:

    As for the AL election, I’m glad it’s in the rear view mirror. The one negative is that the R’s lost a Senate seat. One positive is that Moore’s travails will be cut short now that he is out of the running. For, if he had won, the ethical meladrama would have been been long, intense and impacted the 2018 midterms in an emotional way.

  1050. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    1072. You can almost feel the collective sigh of relief from Republican senators. They would have been subject to a daily clown show, egged on by Bannon.

  1051. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    Donald J. Trump? @realDonaldTrump
    “If last night’s election proved anything, it proved that we need to put up GREAT Republican candidates to increase the razor thin margins in both the House and Senate.”

  1052. Trump says:

    Beyond candidates, the gop needs to give a reason for its voters to come out and vote.

    Not having delivered a lick on its promises is going to cost them. Big time.

    “67 percent of its voters believe the GOP leadership has lost touch with its base.”

    Insipid candidates with nothing to show and mouthing empty platitudes do not appeal. See Ed Gillespie as an example.

  1053. Trump says:

    If 2 out of 3 of your own don’t trust you, you are going to keep losing.

    And to put a reality check on Donald Trump’s tweet, the only GREAT candidates are the ones who WIN.

    Losing great candidates is an oxymoron.

  1054. Tim says:

    I have a question: Am I an honest troll or an “alleged” one? LOL

  1055. Bitterlaw says:

    Janz- That is how I see it. The main reason I do not own a gun is that I would likely be the one shot by it.

  1056. Tina says:

    We did it.

    Evan Mcmuffin

  1057. NYCmike says:

    Tim,

    Make sure to increase your donation to the federal government.

    After all, the tax rates are just the legal minimum one must pay. I am positive that you will give more to your ALMIGHTY POWER, GOVERNMENT.

  1058. NYCmike says:

    http://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/364767-jones-trump-invited-me-to-the-white-house-in-phone-call

    -Bitterlaw, jason, scooter, etc were right!

    Trump is starting to work with Democrats again! Dang!

  1059. NYCmike says:

    In regards to Trey Gowdy “grilling” Rosenstein, did I miss any of it? It was like 7 minutes long, Gowdy spoke for 6-1/2 minutes, then Rosenstein just kinda answered with lawyer-speak, and that was that.

    To me, it was totally ineffective.

  1060. MichiganGuy says:

    Disney to buy 21st Century Fox assets in a deal worth more than $52 billion in stock

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/12/14/disney-to-buy-21st-century-fox-assets.html

  1061. Tina says:

    Mayb he wants to cool the situation down. We ran abad candidate kicked off twice and was unable to respond effectively to the muh yearbook.

    Hopefully the rs start to advance their agendas.

    If tax cuts fail, we are phuqed. It will be a bloodbath come the midterm. Rs will stay home, like they did in alabama.

  1062. Tina says:

    Gowdy is nothing but all smoke and no fire. He looks like a clown with bad hair. Same thing over and over and over.

  1063. Redmen4ever says:

    Suicides rates were high among slaves in America and in Rome. (I can’t speak for other places.) Also, there were slave revolts. Put a man in a corner, and you don’t know how he’ll react.

    We got Moo-re … We got Moo-re … and all we needed was accusations and a fake yearbook. And, oh, yeah, he was an oddball.

    I suppose if you call those who commit suicide weak, you’d call those who revolt strong.

    John Brown was, like this fellow Moore, kind of out there on the Bible. Another oddball. John Brown’s body may lie a-mouldering in the grave, but his soul’s marching on.

  1064. Bitterlaw says:

    Tim – You are not a troll. You are a true Democrat and always wrong. There is a difference.

  1065. Bitterlaw says:

    Red – I am sure that you thought you had a point. Thanks for sharing.

  1066. NYCmike says:

    https://www.thecollegefix.com/post/40000/

    -No need to fight….let’s just rectify it the Established Way.

  1067. NYCmike says:

    http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/13/health/baby-heart-chest-surgery-intl/index.html?sr=twCNN121317baby-heart-chest-surgery-intl0341PMStory

    -In other news, talk about wearing your heart on your sleeve!

    Prayers for this beautiful child, given a chance by her parents, and by wonderful doctors, and modern medicine! May GOD watch over her and help in any way!

  1068. Waingro says:

    “Disney to buy 21st Century Fox assets in a deal worth more than $52 billion in stock

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/12/14/disney-to-buy-21st-century-fox-assets.html

    Doesn’t include any of the tv networks though, including Fox News.

  1069. Walt says:

    More fake news…

    DRUDGE

    World’s oldest man attributes long life to veggies, daily glass of red wine…

  1070. Sheeple, Jr. says:

    1093
    But,unfortunately, it does include the FOX Sports national and regional stations, which will probably be trashed in an effort to increase viewership at ESPN.

  1071. Robbie says:

    A very early look at Tennessee and it’s a warning sign. Blackburn trails by 2.

    orlando-politics.com/2017/12/14/gravis-marketing-tennessee-poll/

  1072. Robbie says:

    The Tennesse poll shows, not that Blackburn will lose, but that the Republican Party is in the trash.

  1073. Tim says:

    Bitterlaw still loves me. (wink)

  1074. Trump says:

    “…that the Republican Party is in the trash.”

    That’s what jerking each other off and not doing their jobs does to a party, cretin Robbie.

    Pass a fu*cking bill.

  1075. Phil says:

    After Trump is impeached that will give Dems another vote in the senate for removal. To be fair, they already had that vote in Corker.

  1076. Trump says:

    12% job approval rating.

  1077. Trump says:

    The most basic function of Congress, passing annual spending bill, is beyond the competence of this leadership.

  1078. Trump says:

    Meanwhile, for reading pleasure,


    Inside McConnell’s slow-motion Alabama train wreck

    The Senate majority leader tried to defuse Alabama’s special election in March. It only got worse from there.

    By KEVIN ROBILLARD

    12/13/2017 10:56 AM EST”

  1079. Phil says:

    The good news?

    Roy Moore is finally gone – forever.

  1080. Proud Obamacon says:

    “Roy Moore is finally gone – forever.”

    You wish. God told him to not concede and fight this out forever! LOL

    It’s not a wave, its a damm tsunami. Sucks to be a Repug these days.

    Bannon and Janz ok? Who’s on suicide watch?

  1081. Paul says:

    Go. Marsha. Go.

  1082. Proud Obamacon says:

    Pussy grabber approval rating down to 32%. The 20s are calling yall!

    53% think Pussy grabber should resign.

    15% generic ballot lead for the good guys.

    Oh yeah, yall think passing a tax increase bill with a 30% approval is going to help yall. LOL wow what logic.

    WORST.ADMIN.EVAHHH

  1083. Sheeple, Jr. says:

    #1096
    That’s wonderful news for Blackburn.
    At this point in the race, the data mostly reflects name identification. Bredesen is known in all parts of TN while Blackburn has high ID in 1 out of— Congressional districts(11%>
    If you look at 2016 polling, Portman(R-OH) was double digits behind Ohio’s former Governor,J. Strictland.

  1084. Proud Obamacon says:

    YALL are damm lucky Pres. Obama left you with a thriving and resilient economy. I really hope it can weather this storm. Not hoping for a downturn so yall can save that crap.

    NOT.MY.PRESIDENT

  1085. Proud Obamacon says:

    Go Romeo Moore Go – stay in the headlines LOL. Jesus is telling you to.

  1086. Trump says:

    POS, keep clinging to your Obama myth.

    There’s nothing else left for you.

    President Trump. To 2024 and beyond.

  1087. Phil says:

    Moore is gone. He’ll be big stuff on MSNBC which nobody watches but the rest of America doesn’t follow Roy Moore. He’s done.

  1088. Trump says:

    By the time Trump is done, Obama will be a sad footnote in history.

  1089. Proud Obamacon says:

    LOL delusional much?

  1090. Trump says:

    The affirmative action commie could not destroy enough, it seems.

  1091. Tina says:

    I will make sure the republican party is in the thrash.
    Mcmuffin

  1092. Proud Obamacon says:

    Your Orange Sex Fantasy is going to end up being the worst president in history and it won’t even be close. What an embarassment and a sh!tstain on our history. 32% approval and still not a year into his presidency. Worst than Buchanan and Pierce!

    You probably know this, but go ahead keep up the charade. Putin must be paying you well! LOLLLL

  1093. Trump says:

    But enough to destroy Hillary, for sure.

  1094. Tina says:

    Phil, not so fast, mr. Bible is not conceding the race.

  1095. Phil says:

    Putin…blah blah blah

  1096. Trump says:

    There is no competition, POS. When the affirmative action commie is on the list.

  1097. Proud Obamacon says:

    LOL Back to Hillary.. weak!

    Go Roy Go!

  1098. Phil says:

    Nobody cares what he does, Tina.

    Nobody.

  1099. Trump says:

    The affirmative action commie was so incompetent, couldn’t even rig the election enough for the crooked b*tch.

  1100. dblaikie says:

    Oh, how I hope and pray that the Dems believe Ted Cruz is in trouble in Texas (on Drudge). I hope that they spend loads and loads of money on the race. What a joke. Just like most times the Dems are going to overreach in reading the tea leaves in Alabama. JONES DID NOT WIN ON LIBERAL ISSUES.

  1101. Phil says:

    1124

    Not for lack of trying….

    He gave it his best shot.

  1102. Proud Obamacon says:

    In all fairness, not sure where Pres. Obama ends up on the list. But it definitely helps having this buffoon following him. He could make anyone look like George Washington!

    Such an embarassment – go tag in the other Trump posters from your team of russians. Must be tiring defending this sorry excuse for a man.

    RESIST!

  1103. Proud Obamacon says:

    “The affirmative action commie was so incompetent, couldn’t even rig the election enough for the crooked b*tch.”

    I know right. He actually believed in Democracy and fair elections, unlike your Orange wanna be dictator taking his marching orders from Putin.

  1104. Phil says:

    Oooooh…..the Russians!

  1105. Trump says:

    #Always.your.president, POS.

    That’s Donald.

    Sucks to be you.

  1106. Trump says:

    POS, look outside…there’s a Russian helicopter!

  1107. Phil says:

    The Russians are coming!!

  1108. Proud Obamacon says:

    It’s the only explanation. There are so many Trumps posting here. Russian trolls is my guess. Why yall pick HHR to troll? Place already littered with Trump voters. Maybe to keep them on the boat? Odd

  1109. Phil says:

    Oh God! Russians everywhere!

    Run everybody!

  1110. Proud Obamacon says:

    “Sucks to be you.”

    Actually sucks to be you having to defend the sorry ass Orange Groper. It’s a gunna be a tough year for you, sport. Do you feel the wave? Do you feel the tsunami?

  1111. Trump says:

    Piece of Sh*t, Hillary gave uranium to Putin in exchange for $500k to Bill.

    Still could not get the lying bi*tch elected.

  1112. Trump says:

    Phil,

    dasvidanya

    see you in Moscow.

  1113. Trump says:

    Is that meth talking, Piece of Sh*t? A bit early in the morning, isn’t it?

  1114. Proud Obamacon says:

    Still talking about Hillary LOL – pathetic

  1115. Trump says:

    “Pres. Obama left you with a thriving and resilient economy.”

    The economy really took off as soon as Obama left.

    Imagine that!

  1116. Trump says:

    Still talking about Pres. Urkel.

    Sad.

  1117. Tina says:

    Dumb dumb april is having a fake news day.

    Poor cnn and n.

  1118. Tina says:

    2016 obama gdp 1.5.%
    Growing at inflation.

  1119. Proud Obamacon says:

    Imagine what? The economy continuing to grow. You are very low IQ, feel sorry for ya!

  1120. Proud Obamacon says:

    Hey, there will always be BENGHAZI!

  1121. Proud Obamacon says:

    Since yall like talking about the stock market again, the DOW tripled under Obama once his policies took control of the trainwreck he inherited.

    Soooo.. Dow $60,000 in 2024 when your Orange Master leaves the WH?

  1122. Phil says:

    Tina just put your Obama economic “growth” in perspective.

  1123. Proud Obamacon says:

    The smartest thing yall can do is to do nothing and let the economy continue humming along. But no, your tax increase to implement trickle down is oh so important. Well for the donor class and Orange’s personal finance it is! Pathetic!

    Trickle down doesn’t work. Its a scam.

  1124. Proud Obamacon says:

    Perspective? Trump would need to bring the Dow to $60,000 to match. How’s that for perspective, Phil?

  1125. Phil says:

    Obama economic “recovery”

    weakest post recession recovery in history.

    Facts are stubborn things.

  1126. Tina says:

    Obama 8 years gdp averaged 1.5. The worst since truman.

  1127. Proud Obamacon says:

    Tripling of stock market – yeah, real weak.

  1128. Tina says:

    Maybe obama cost her thighness the election with the weak 2016 gdp growth?

  1129. Proud Obamacon says:

    Look yall, the economy is great. I give you that and whoever is responsible, I dont even care. The prob yall got is that even with this great economy, your Groper in Chief is at 32% and about to hit the 20s LOL The good guys are winning in AL. We win in AL, we win anywhere. I hope Tom Perez is working on his 50 state strategy!

    BLUE.TSUNAMI.COMIN’

  1130. Phil says:

    Tripling the stock market

    Unfortunately for Hillary the voters must not have gotten the memo.

  1131. Proud Obamacon says:

    “Maybe obama cost her thighness the election”

    And we go back to Hillary! Don’t forget about Benghazi and PizzaGate!

  1132. Trump says:

    The best part of Obama presidency was his leaving.

  1133. Proud Obamacon says:

    Damn yall just can’t stop talking about Hillary? Hmm why not just defend your Orange Groper? LAME

  1134. Proud Obamacon says:

    “The best part of Obama presidency was his leaving.”

    And the best part of Groper’s presidency will be his leaving too. Only difference is that Groper will be fired after one term with approval in the 20s. Pres. Obama left on his own terms with 60% approval, LIKE A BOSS!

  1135. Tina says:

    Pizzagate, whatever that is, is a jebot special.

  1136. Bitterlaw says:

    Trump vs PO is like Freddy vs Jason. It is hard to cheer for either one but Trump has the better argument.

  1137. Proud Obamacon says:

    You wish, Pizzagate is a Trump special. Enjoy

  1138. Tina says:

    What about the jayvee team?

  1139. Trump says:

    “Trickle down doesn’t work.”

    Nothing works for you, Piece of Sh*t. For things to work for you, you have to work.

  1140. Tina says:

    What about wiretapping political opponents?

  1141. Proud Obamacon says:

    When Reagan cut taxes for the rich in 81, economic growth went down by 1.9 percent the following year and the unemployment rate increased from 7.5% to 10.8%. The 1981 tax cut was so successful that Ronnie had to increase taxes 11 times after that. After GW. Bush cut taxes for the wealthy and large corporations, we lost nearly 500,000 private sector jobs, the national debt almost doubled, poverty increased, and median income went down. After right-wing Repugs in Kansas cut taxes for the wealthy, revenue declined so much they had to make drastic cuts in education, health care, transportation, and infrastructure. In other words, trickle-down economics failed miserably in Kansas. It failed under the Reagan administration, and it failed under the administration of Dubya Bush. It is a fraudulent theory cooked up by think tanks funded by the wealthy.

    Facts, they hurt don’t they

  1142. Trump says:

    You have to work to get economic benefit, Piece of Sh*t.

    Getting up in the morning and waiting for welfare check in the mail is not real work, regardless of what you are used to.

  1143. Tina says:

    Sahil Kapur
    Sahil Kapur
    @sahilkapur
    “I know we’re supposed to cheer for our side of the aisle, if you will, but I’m really, really happy with what happened,” @SenBobCorker says on MSNBC re: Doug Jones’ victory.
    7:14 AM · Dec 13, 2017

    Real gop celebrating.

  1144. mnw says:

    Hey, Corker?

    Nobody gives a redpizz what a lameduck thinks about anything.

  1145. Walt says:

    DRUDGE

    SPEAKER RYAN TO STEP ASIDE, LEAVE DC

  1146. Cash Cow TM says:

    Moo!?!

    Have we lost an advocate for the dairy industry and us cows?

  1147. dblaikie says:

    I think I will wait for Ryan and not depend on Politico.

  1148. Tina says:

    Ryan says fake news.

  1149. Tina says:

    Politicon is wrong.

    Btw, eric holder just threatned congrss not to fire mulehead.

  1150. Proud Obamacon says:

    Today’s the anniversary of the Sandy Hook shooting, if you believe it actually happened.

    The Sandy Hook students would have been in the sixth grade this year, but hey .. its just the price of freedom, right ? Disgusting

  1151. Trump says:

    How many abortions since 1973, Piece of Sh*t?

    50m?

  1152. Trump says:

    Frredom of choice, right, Pice of Sh*t?

  1153. Proud Obamacon says:

    OH you dont like abortions, so you think it’s ok to shoot kindergarteners. Got it, thanks sicko

  1154. Trump says:

    Great plan to manage the growth of the “undesirable” black population, Piece of Sh*t?

  1155. Trump says:

    Who shot the kids, piece of shi&?

  1156. Trump says:

    Living off welfare checks is no way to live, POS.

  1157. Proud Obamacon says:

    OK.. need to go back on your meds, bruhh. Not making much sense there.

  1158. NYCmike says:

    YES.

    COD is waiting for another chance!

  1159. Paul says:

    “I’m not a witch. I’m you.”

  1160. lisab says:

    the doctor who worked on the clinton foundation’s charity operations in haiti just committed suicide

    stapped himself to death in the chest

  1161. Paul says:

    Abortion rates fell to the lowest since 1973 under Obama.

  1162. Paul says:

    lisab is very funny.

  1163. Paul says:

    1188: Very sad.

  1164. Paul says:

    My numbers are off, sorry. Very sad about Dr. Lorich.

  1165. Tina says:

    Schweikart
    @LarrySchweikart
    The fact that Bootless is now agitated about the investigation turning on Combover & Deep Stroke should tell you all you need to know about where Mulehead is realky headed
    12:51 PM · Dec 14, 2017

    He uses more nicknames than I.

  1166. mnw says:

    Tina

    All the nicknames make it hard for me to figure out the content of the posts. Just saying.

  1167. mnw says:

    Rubio

    Making trouble, being an adzh*le as always. Of course.

  1168. Paul says:

    Not sure how Farenthold who used tax payer money to settle sexual assault gets to stay in his job.

  1169. Wes says:

    Farenthold is retiring, Paul.

  1170. Paul says:

    Yes, a year from now….

  1171. Robbie says:

    Tina says:
    December 14, 2017 at 12:05 pm
    Pizzagate, whatever that is, is a jebot special.

    – Bless your heart. “Pizzagate” was a ridiculous conspiracy theory pushed by Mike Cernovich and your boy Jack Posobiec that Hillary Clinton was running a child sex ring in the basement of Comet Pizza in Washington DC.

  1172. Cash Cow TM says:

    Lots more sexually allegations…no updated list…

    WHERE THE HELL IS DW?

  1173. Cash Cow TM says:

    Walt assigned me to do HIS job of doing about 100 Christmas cards…signing, addressing, stamping, return address labels…

    DO YOU KNOW HOW HARD IT IS TO DO ALL THOSE THINGS WHEN YOU HAVE 4 HOOFS?

  1174. Cash Cow TM says:

    I have tired hoofs…

  1175. Sheeple, Jr. says:

    Here is a prediction on RRH for the 2018 House of Representatives from an alleged Republican on that site. He predicts a loss of between 90-100 seats.

    “Let me correct that, kind of meant more 1/4th of R+10 to R+15. (and not R+10 to R+35).
    90-100 seats is where I’d have to put my over/under at this point.”

  1176. Proud Obamacon says:

    DW is taking some time to write u the minute my minute recap of the ALABAMA election. Can’t wait to ready it.

    DW, remember my request to include the Breitbart liveblog.

    Good ch!t !

  1177. jason says:

    Right out of Pravda, Proud Obamacon’s favorite newspaper..

    “MSNBC political analyst Elise Jordan complained Wednesday about how “unfortunate” it is that the Republican Party’s ability to craft its tax reform bill with a congressional majority resulted from “how you voted in an election.”

  1178. jason says:

    The tax bill is going to pass.

    And of course its going to help the economy.

    Obama presided over the worst “recovery” in history, now you will see a real recovery.

    It will be good to see Proud ObamaCON’s meltdown.

    He hates to see “government money” given back to those who actually earned it.

  1179. jason says:

    Proud ObamaCON should man up and go live in North Korea, the true socialist paradise.

  1180. Cash Cow TM says:

    DW,

    FINALLY, a WV born and raised guy to add to the list of inappropriate actions.
    **************************************
    Morgan Spurlock (film producer, etc.)

  1181. Cash Cow TM says:

    DE Sen. Tom Carper admits he slapped his wife.

  1182. Tina says:

    Looks like lisabs foam boy, rubio is now a no on tax cuts.

    Ahole.

  1183. jason says:

    Marxist inspired “Net Neutrality” bites the dust.

    Wobbie to whine Trump attacked Mika’s face

  1184. lisab says:

    the trouble with the dems taking the house is that the day after they took control they would impeach trump.

    the precedent would be set that if the dems lose an election they would simply attempt to overthrow the election.

  1185. Tina says:

    Mnw, boothead, no clue.

    Mulehead is mueller.

    Combover is comey aka comedy.

  1186. Tina says:

    Foam boy did say that the az ahole that is leaving is a grue conservative.

    If they shoot blanks legislatively, we are phuqed.

  1187. lisab says:

    rubio knows that if he can screw up the tax bill until next year, it wont get passed at all.

    they really dont want tax rates going down or the standard deductible going up.

  1188. Cash Cow TM says:

    “Omar Ashmawy, staff director and chief counsel of the Office of Congressional Ethics, stems from his involvement in a late-night brawl in 2015 in Milford, Pennsylvania, and includes a range of allegations relating to his behavior that evening and in the following two-and-half years.”

  1189. Tina says:

    Mnw, basicalky to summarize, mueller, doj, ig, etc. are now after the leakers, pete the cheat, the mistress, ohn, unweissman, etc.

    Tax cuts need to pass, however.

    Indictments and firings are coming.

  1190. Tina says:

    Trump has cut 22regulations for every new regulation added.

    The most conservative regulation buster since reagan, maybe even better.

    Def better than groper 41and mute 43 and the two drats after.

  1191. Cash Cow TM says:

    DRUDGE

    ‘Stormy’ the cow lassoed on highway after 2nd escape from church natitivty scene…

    Cousin Stormy was always a feisty thing.

  1192. jason says:

    day’s the anniversary of the Sandy Hook shooting, if you believe it actually happened.

    The Sandy Hook students would have been in the sixth grade this year, but hey .. its just the price of freedom, right ? Disgusting”

    Translation: let me use the actions of a sick teenager using stolen weapons to demonize tens of millions of responsible gun owners.

    You know what is disgusting? Using the murder of children as and excuse to advance your political agenda.

    Nothing is too low for the marxist scumbag.

  1193. Proud Obamacon says:

    No sicko, you know what’s disgusting? Turning a blind eye to kids being gunned down and saying its the “cost of freedom”

  1194. Proud Obamacon says:

    Paul Ryan considering retirement.

    Smart move, Eddie Munster. He knows this year is going to suck for the Repug party, and then the House will be lost. No political future for Eddie Munster – SAD!

  1195. Tina says:

    What about planned parenthood selling body parts?

  1196. Tina says:

    Boom

    Trey gowdy

    Predicts mccabe will be fired by next week,

    Lets see if Bad Hair Gowdy is right.

  1197. Big Joe says:

    Knicks vs Nets tonight. It’s the battle for New York!

    Big Joe

  1198. Big Joe says:

    Well I was wrong about Alabama. I thought Moore would win by 4-6 points. Just started looking at the exits and results today.

    At first glance, it looks like near presidential level turnout on the D side and anemic turnout for R’s. Obviously the pervert charges against Moore are a one-off occurrence, but I’ll be eager to see if the data can tell us how much it really hurt him. I went on record here saying that R’s will vote for R’s and D’s will vote for D’s (it happened in 2016) but it didn’t happen here. R’s stayed home.

    That said, voter enthusiasm and intensity is definitely a thing and it’s with the Democrats currently, big time.

    Big Joe

  1199. Big Joe says:

    Tina,

    My 401K employer match gets invested on Dec. 15 (tomorrow) as a lump some. It would have been nice to dollar cost average this year. Buying at the top is nerve wracking.

    Hope you are well.

    Big Joe

  1200. Big Joe says:

    lump *sum* – oops

  1201. lisab says:

    nyt: obama lied only 18 times in entire presidency

    he is the list

    1.) if you like your doctor you can keep your doctor
    2.) he never raised taxes (obamacare)
    3.) he did not know about hillary’s email server, although he sent her emails
    4.) the irs doesn’t have a smidgeon of corruction
    5.) a video caused benghazi
    6.) you can end oil imports by inflating your tires
    7.) isis is the jv team
    8.) shovel ready jobs!
    9.) under obamacare premiums have gone up slower than at any time in 50 years
    10.) under obamacare the avg. family will see their premiums go down $2500
    11.) i made a bunch of promises and got 90% of them done in three years
    12.) under the white house’s budget proposal, “we will not be adding more to the national debt” by the middle of the decade.
    13.) the vast majority of the money I got was from small donors all across the country.
    14.) we excluded lobbyists from policymaking
    15.)obamacare will allow people to get the same insurance congress gets
    16.) we import more oil today than ever before
    17.) abortions under bush did not go down
    18.) the U.S. government spends less on energy innovation than the pet food industry invests in its own products.

    well … that is all 18 … there is not one more lie that obama said

  1202. Tina says:

    Here is the ig letter. To chairman grassley that smoked out oeter and the mistress.

    https://www.scribd.com/document/367204037/OIG-Letter-to-Congress-Explaining-Strzok-and-Page-Text-Messaging-Origin

    Imo, hatch act violations.

  1203. Proud Obamacon says:

    And the OraNGE pussy Grabber lies 18 times per hour. Really outperforming Obama’s @ss!! LOL

  1204. Tina says:

    Hi big joe. I still have the bp shares.

  1205. Tina says:

    Doj permitted and tot permitted political activities
    Express opinions about candidates and issues (if the expression is political activity directed at the success or failure of a political party, candidate for partisan political office or partisan political group, the expression is not permitted while the employee is on duty, in any federal room or building, while wearing a uniform or official insignia or using any federally-owned or leased vehicle)

    Pete and the mistress used gubment cell phones. Claear hatch act violations,

    Immediate termination.

  1206. Big Joe says:

    Tina, you’re a loyal shareholder. I had a nice ride with BP and even held on a year after Deepwater Horizon. But the stock wasn’t going anywhere so I dumped it.

    Just putting everything into the S&P 500 index. No time or stomach for individual stocks.

    Big Joe

  1207. lisab says:

    flake no on taxes

  1208. Cash Cow TM says:

    I lie about 2 hours in the morning, and another 2-3 hours in the pasture in the afternoon.

  1209. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    Victor Davis Hansen agrees with Cow on Trump needing to be more presidential:

    “Why Trump Should Consider a Post-Twitter Presidency”

    https://townhall.com/columnists/victordavishanson/2017/12/14/why-trump-should-consider-a-posttwitter-presidency-n2422003

  1210. Cash Cow TM says:

    Chickens LAY…Cows LIE.

    Trolls FABRICATE

    Politicials SPIN

    SPIN=Self-serving Politically Interesting News

  1211. Tina says:

    Looks like the deadenders will kill tax cuts.

  1212. Cash Cow TM says:

    SDC,

    So many folks are agreeing with what Cow wrote that I am considering starting a DW like list.

    You should see how much mail, phone calls and tweets I am getting…
    (#Cowspeaksforme…)

  1213. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    1241. Good to hear Cow. Imagine a lot of people want a bite out of you now.

  1214. Phil says:

    Flake a no on taxes?

    That kills it.

    Bloodbath in November. Republicans deserve it.

  1215. Proud Obamacon says:

    Whatda fukk? Really Flake is no? I dont know man, I think the thing still passes. But if not, the market is headed for a dive. Sorry Big Joe! LOL

  1216. Phil says:

    Yep.

    Bottom will drop out of the market.

  1217. Big Joe says:

    Well s h i t

    Big Joe

  1218. lisab says:

    Really Flake is no?
    —————-

    he wants something for his vote, i did not catch what

  1219. Tina says:

    Rubio and flake are deadenders

    Pos. Foam boy and tan fugly.

  1220. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 14, 2017 at 5:45 pm
    Marxist inspired “Net Neutrality” bites the dust.
    Wobbie to whine Trump attacked Mika’s face

    – Yes, I will complain about a president who demeans the office through his petty Twitter attacks. That’s because I have a conscience.

    On the other hand, you’re a soulless hack and a fraud who has outed himself as someone who only cares whether a candidate has a R or a D next to their name.

  1221. Robbie says:

    SanDiegoCitizen says:
    December 14, 2017 at 6:29 pm
    Victor Davis Hansen agrees with Cow on Trump needing to be more presidential:
    “Why Trump Should Consider a Post-Twitter Presidency”
    https://townhall.com/columnists/victordavishanson/2017/12/14/why-trump-should-consider-a-posttwitter-presidency-n2422003

    – Something some of us have been advocating since last February.

  1222. Tina says:

    Foam boy will never be president now.

    Amnesty

    Endorsed fraud flakey

    Now, against tax cuts.

  1223. Tina says:

    I have been advocating for Hillary since november of 2016

    Mcstuffin and the jebots.

  1224. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 14, 2017 at 6:44 pm
    Flake a no on taxes?
    That kills it.
    Bloodbath in November. Republicans deserve it.

    – He’s said no such thing. Just because FoxNews speculates he MIGHT not like the bill doesn’t mean anything. FoxNews is also pushing the idea the FBI is just like the KGB.

    The only person who has said “NO” is St. Marco Rubio. Of course, we all know Rubio is just posturing and will back down.

    Don’t forget. Flake voted for Obamacare repeal and the tax bill a few weeks ago. Other than he doesn’t like Trump (join the club), on what piece of major legislation has he abandoned the party?

  1225. Robbie says:

    Tina says:
    December 14, 2017 at 7:32 pm
    I have been advocating for Hillary since november of 2016
    Mcstuffin and the jebots.

    – Bless your heart. How was shock therapy today? Did it leave any singe marks on your temples?

  1226. Tina says:

    Phuq flakey, if it is not him, its rubio, or then mcamanesty or then the maine chicklet or senator planned parenthood.

    No leadership if this gors diwn mitchie needs to resifn.

  1227. Tina says:

    Bless your heart, wrote the ky drat from yippieville.

  1228. Tina says:

    Mitchie needs to go. He has phuqed up on obamacare, phuqed up by getting involved in alabama, and phiqed up with tax cuts.

    But lets keep him as majority leader because he is so awesome.

  1229. Tina says:

    Fraud flakey wants daca. Daca is illegal. Why is he supporting daca, the amnesty loving idiot.

  1230. Tina says:

    IF mitchie had balls, he would start stripping these deadenders of their committee assignments.

    Phuq them all.

  1231. Tina says:

    Looks like the drats and jebots are melting down over net neutrality being killed.

  1232. Tina says:

    Nikki Haley
    Nikki Haley
    @nikkihaley
    ·
    4h
    “The fight against Iranian aggression is the world’s fight… This missile was used to attack an international civilian airport in Saudi Arabia. Just imagine if this missile had been launched at Dulles Airport or JFK, or the airports in Paris, London, or Berlin.”

    Nikki, please inform mullah corker.

  1233. lisab says:

    flake wants daca amnesty

  1234. MichiganGuy says:

    2020 National Republican Primary (PPP)
    Trump 70%
    Someone else 24%
    .
    Trump 62%
    Pence 22%
    .
    Trump 64%
    Cruz 21%
    .
    Trump 70%
    Kasich 19%
    .
    Trump 74%
    Flake 16%

    2020 GE:
    Biden 54%
    Trump 40%
    .
    Sanders 53%
    Trump 40%
    .
    Warren 51%
    Trump 42%
    .
    Booker 50%
    Trump 40%
    .
    Gillibrand 47%
    Trump 40%
    .
    Harris 46%
    Trump 40%

    https://www.publicpolicypolling.com/polls/voters-think-trump-resign-harassment-allegations/

  1235. Tina says:

    Real cons

    Love obamacare.

    Love spending

    Love war

    Love tax increases

    Love debt.

    Love ilkegals.

    This is the r party.

  1236. MichiganGuy says:

    2018 Tennessee Senate GE (Gravis)

    Phil Bredesen 42%
    Stephen Fincher 38%

    Phil Bredesen 42%
    Marsha Blackburn 40%

    Peyton Manning (R) 44%
    Phil Bredesen 39%

    TENNESSEE

    Trump Job Approval:
    Approve 52%
    Disapprove 41%

  1237. Tina says:

    Mccains health has taken a turn for the worst. .

    Not good.

  1238. Tina says:

    Retweeted
    MARK SIMONE
    MARK SIMONE
    @MarkSimoneNY
    Congratulations to Robert Mueller. His investigation has finally turned up evidence of collusion and tampering with the election – by the FBI. #DrainTheDeepState
    4:54 PM · Dec 14, 2017

  1239. dblaikie says:

    Thanks Michigan Guy for the polls. I see old PPP is up to its tricks of producing a bogus poll just for the Sunday news. I think though that they had a secret question. It is this: Are you excited about Mika and Joe’s engagement? 60% said yes.

  1240. lisab says:

    i think trump would beat any of those listed pretty easily

    assuming biden is too old — if he is feeling well i think he could beat trump, but he has issues since his son died.

    also, i think gillibrand could get the hillary vote, but i am not sure if she could get the aa vote.

    the others i think would do poorly against trump.

  1241. lisab says:

    if sanders runs, i think he has a good chance at the nomination. the millenials love him

  1242. lisab says:

    but then i thought rand paul was going to inherit his father’s support AND get some mainstream support as well

    which did not come close to happening

    so maybe harris and warren win 🙂

  1243. Robbie says:

    It really says something about the state of the Republican Party that FoxNews and other conservative voices have taken to smearing the FBI and comparing it to the KGB just to defend Trump.

  1244. Tina says:

    Its really sad that the obama administration weaponized the fbi.

  1245. Phil says:

    Smearing the FBI?

    Have you even been following what’s been uncovered over the last week to ten days?

    Smearing my ass!

  1246. Tina says:

    phil, it is all the drats have left. Do not smear the fbi. Borrowed from eric holder, who,is the first ag held in contempt of congresss.

  1247. Tina says:

    “I want to believe the path you threw out for consideration in Andy’s office that there’s no way he gets elected – but I’m afraid we can’t take that risk. It’s like an insurance policy in the unlikely event you die before you’re 40.”

    What did peter and the mistress mean and why was this discusee in andys office?

  1248. Bitterlaw says:

    Jason – rent the original Star Wars (A New Hope). I read this trivia fact and want to know if it is correct:

    “The language Greedo speaks is a South American language called Quechua.”

  1249. Chicon says:

    Phil, we all know Robbie would be livid about the FBI is Hillary or JEB! were President.

  1250. Tina says:

    The jebots need to quit protrcting her thighness. She lost.

  1251. Phil says:

    The whole thing stinks to high heaven.

  1252. Tina says:

    Jeff Retweeted
    Ted Cruz
    Ted Cruz
    @tedcruz
    ·
    1h
    Snowflake, believing online propaganda: “OMG w/o net neutrality, the Internet is gone!” Informed observer: “You know, the FCC issued that rule in 2015. The Internet grew up wonderfully free from govt regulation & this restores the status quo ante.” Snowflake: “Uh, never mind…”

  1253. Hugh says:

    Robbie. You and me are 50 50. Trump is an as s butnthe doj and fbi management is rotten. I will e proven right. Sadly trump who can make our economy him is such an as s he will cause the gop great unnecessary harm and the fbi and doj leadership will be shown to total political hacks and hopefully more than a few go to jail. s previously said my hope for trump is a heart attack.

  1254. mnw says:

    MG

    I agree that for a PPP poll this early, Blackburn looks to be in good shape.

  1255. Tina says:

    Yeah it stinks phil. Theynwent over the top and tried to protect hillary. Makes sense why she soent more time off the campaign than on it.

  1256. Ron N says:

    How much do u want to bet that strzok was a member of the team that came up with the intel the Russian interfered with the election for the FBI. I wonder who the CIA put on that team and if they are buddies. How many of the breaking news story was he was the source or his GF not only them but the lawyer and his wife.

  1257. Hugh says:

    1288. I’m sure the leadership at doj fbi and cia had been politicized. If trump had a little self restraint they would be crushed and they may still. We’ll see

  1258. Tina says:

    Self restraint? The russian hoax has been going in since 6/16.

    The ig matter since 1/17.

  1259. Cash Cow TM says:

    WHERE MY NEW DAMN THREAD AT?

  1260. SanDiegoCitizen says:

    1256. “Bless your heart, wrote the ky drat from yippieville.”

    Actually I think Roy Moore is on his way to Yippieville. He was seen approaching it on a horse. There is now a curfew that all kids under 16 be off the street from dusk to dawn.

  1261. Cash Cow TM says:

    If you review up thread, let the record show that Cash Cow was first to congratulate Sen. Jones.

    Early in the election results…

  1262. Cash Cow TM says:

    Why do PBS TV stations air kids programs at 1 nd 2 in the morning?

    No kids are up then…

  1263. Cash Cow TM says:

    Why do grocery stores stock bottles of syrup at one place, and bottles of molasses at another?

  1264. Cash Cow TM says:

    Why do deer insist on raiding the bird feeders?

  1265. Cash Cow TM says:

    Why does the news media air stories of how much damage is done to the atmosphere by cow farts, and no stories about damage done to the air by the A forest fires and various volcano eruptions elsewhere?

  1266. Cash Cow TM says:

    …”A” should be CA…

  1267. Cash Cow TM says:

    Why can’t cows vote?

  1268. Tina says:

    “He belongs in LEAVENWORTH. He belongs BEHIND BARS! These things CANNOT happen in a DEMOCRACY.”

    Former assistant fbi director kallstrom re pete the cheat.

  1269. Bitterlaw says:

    Where is Jason? It’s lunch time for him.

  1270. dblaikie says:

    I am not a lawyer or expert in these matters, but this meeting that took place at Andrew Macabe’s seems like a potential smoking gun to me. If so there is going to be a huge mess in the FBI and Justice Department.

    I wonder if Jeff Sessions will have the guts to open this Pandora’s box.

  1271. NYCmike says:

    Who else may be a Nay? Rubio, Flake and ….. is mccain really sick, or could that be a way to stay away from DC to avoid voting?

  1272. NYCmike says:

    I do know McCain is sick by the way, with his pretty terrible cancer. I do not want him to go out this way. I also want him to vote Yay. Hopefully he can rebound from this latest challenge.

  1273. Bitterlaw says:

    db – Unlike Tina, I do not know where this will lead. I think it is unfortunate that so many fine agents working on solving many types of crimes will be tainted by this mess.

  1274. NYCmike says:

    Hugh,

    No sense in trying to help Robbie see the rot within a politicized portion of the FBI/CIA/DOJ. He will not accept that at all. He is all about Trump.

  1275. Bitterlaw says:

    We can only hope that McCain’s last thought will not be about his family. It will be “How can I get to the Senate to please NYC with my vote?”

    Too bad that McCain hates Trump. Of course, if I was a former POW insulted by a draft-dodging scumbag, I would also harbor some resentment. I hope he can vote yes and then tell Trump to F off.

  1276. NYCmike says:

    That is correct, Bitterlaw.

    Good agents will be looked at differently because of this.

  1277. Bitterlaw says:

    My father has a friend who was an FBI agent. He said that at one point, all agents had to have law degrees. I never felt like looking it up. I doubt that is true now.

  1278. Bitterlaw says:

    I never knew selfies were so dangerous.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/Bbc-3FlH4LJ/

  1279. Bitterlaw says:

    Miss Iraq received death threats over that photo.

  1280. Chicon says:

    I’ll not count on the tax cut passing the Senate until the gavel falls.

  1281. Phil says:

    I hate seeing John McCain go out this way. Cancer is a horrible disease. I am very critical of him and his behavior on issues. That’s where my criticism starts and stops. Wish him the best in his fight – and that’s what it is – a fight.

  1282. Bitterlaw says:

    Cancer is horrible. However, I still wish I had a choice at 14 of diabetes. I would have taken cancer because I would have died or been cured. 35 years of diabetes just stretches out the suffering.

  1283. Tina says:

    http://freebeacon.com/politics/trump-cuts-22-regs-every-new-one/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

    Regulation cuts 22 to 1

    He eliminated over 800 regukations from the obumbler

  1284. Tina says:

    Bl, i do not know where it is going. Of cocnern is what may happen.

    Are all indicitments, please from muelller ao tainted that they are tossed?

    Are there hatch act violations?

    What didmpete and the mistress mean by insurance policy against trump.

    The biggest concern is why was the fbi weaponized against a politician or oerson running for the wh. This shoukd be our biggest concern, regardless of party affiliation.

  1285. Tina says:

    They say that the biggest problem with the fbi is that there are no agents runnning it. The ines in charge are all lawyah.

    No disespect to lawyahs, just poiinting out what folks are sayimg

  1286. Bitterlaw says:

    I do not know what happens if you confess to a crime but the investigation was tainted. I could argue it either way.

  1287. Tina says:

    It all raises questions, we can speculate.

    I, however, have aeen more and more people, who are not necessarily pro trump, heck maybe neutral or against trump, indicste the fbi matter smells.

    Immediately, i can see hatch act ciolations. Using gubment property to write political statements.

  1288. Phil says:

    Type I diabetes is horrible for two reasons – one, unlike type two, you can’t ever make it recede with diet, second, the serious health problems it causes on the body takes a huge toll. My colleague I taught with down the hall struggled with Infections that are slow to heal, he needed bypass surgery at fifty, and although I’ve lost touch with him since my retirement, I’m told he has had amputation of his foot. Those are just the results of the disease on his body that I know about.

    Although I haven’t walked in Bitter’s shoes with the disease myself, I have seen the ravages of it on a friend and others. There is no cure for it. Like cancer it is a daily fight but it’s lifetime from cradle to grave. I wish Bitter the best.

  1289. Phil says:

    The FBI thing smells and guess what – it’s going to stink more and more as things the FBI has been stione walling come out day by day……..drip, drip, drip

  1290. jason says:

    Drudge Headline:

    Next Roy Moore in AZ, NV?

    I guess he figured out running deadenders is not a good idea.

  1291. jason says:

    “The language Greedo speaks is a South American language called Quechua.”

    Will check it out and report at the next A-hole meeting.

    I hope my expenses to drive to Blockbuster in a big city to rent the VCR tape will be covered by the Club.

  1292. NYCmike says:

    I have said it before, and will say it again: Sessions can NOT rush in these cases. He must be deliberate, patient, cagey. He must make false moves to try to flush out any disloyal persons. EVERY technicality in the book must be looked at carefully, as each individual will seek to protect themself in certain ways. It can not, and should not, be rushed.*

    *Of course, the fact that Congress has been so utterly useless in pushing a Republican agenda, which is what they were elected to do, will endanger any actions which are the jurisdiction of the Executive Branch.

  1293. NYCmike says:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsfZQUezZIM

    -Does this make Han Solo a racist?

  1294. Phil says:

    Everyone is a racist who is not a minority according to white liberals – except them of course.

  1295. jason says:

    Proud ObamaCON’s Marxist dream in action…

    LIMA, Peru — It is 8 a.m. and the line of Venezuelan refugees outside the Interpol office already stretches to the end of the block. Most have just arrived in Lima with not much more than the clothes on their back and are here applying for a certificate to show they have no criminal record, a requirement for a work permit in Peru. “Leaving was tough, but staying would have been tougher,” said Andrea Sequiera, 29, as she waits at the back of the line with her husband Luis, 31, and 8-year-old son Fabian. Although Venezuelans for years have been fleeing the “socialist revolution” first launched by the late Hugo Chávez in 1999, in recent months the trickle has turned into a flood as living conditions become ever more dire — from hyperinflation to acute shortages of food and medicine to one of the worst homicide rates in the world.”

  1296. jason says:

    Why do deer insist on raiding the bird feeders?”

    I have noticed they don’t show up if you don’t fill them up.

  1297. Tina says:

    It is a drip, drip, drip.. i do not think sesssions and rosenstein are sitting by. They are purposefully being quiet. Nobody even knew about the doj ig investigati9n, but it was launched in 1/17.

    Everybody kept looking for collussion. But we found fbi weaponized against a candidate formthe presidency. This is alarming. Imwoukd say the same if Bush had dine this against the obumbler.

    Even never trumpers are beginn8ng to see this.

  1298. Tina says:

    And those fbi idiots usinf gubment phones to talk politics are beyond stupid.

    That is a hatch act violation. The recourse is termination.

  1299. jason says:

    Walt have you noticed “squirrel proof” feeders are not squirrel proof?

  1300. jason says:

    Trump at FBI today, should be entertaining.

  1301. jason says:

    “Trump Poised to Set Record for Appeals Court Judges … That would mean at least a dozen Trump appointees would join the nation’s appeals courts — which have the last word in all but the 100 or so cases that the Supreme Court decides ..”

    Meanwhile, Wobbie is still commenting on fake journalist scumbag Mika’s face…

  1302. Bitterlaw says:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=la7uuFsCIrg

    Save yourself the trip. MD froze our account.

  1303. Bitterlaw says:

    Losing MD hurt. Now we have to find somebody else to wear the elf costume. It fit him perfectly.

  1304. Tina says:

    Looks like rubio is again supporting the latest bill.

    Per s. Varney fnb.

  1305. Chicon says:

    Jason, Trump could do 99 of 100 things right and Robbie will only talk about the one. That’s why his rantings are worthless at this point. If he could write once in awhile about Trump’s successes, his rantings would be more credible.

  1306. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 14, 2017 at 9:38 pm
    Smearing the FBI?
    Have you even been following what’s been uncovered over the last week to ten days?
    Smearing my ass!

    – You’re embarrassing yourself and it’s sad to watch.

  1307. jason says:

    But hey, let’s focus on Trump Jr’s meeting with Russian lawyer….

    “The government watchdog group Judicial Watch released documents today from the U.S. State Department showing that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her top aide Huma Abedin were allowed to “remove electronic and physical records under a claim they were ‘personal’ materials and ‘unclassified, non-record materials,” including files on Clinton’s telephone calls and schedules that were not to be made public. In addition, the documents show that Abedin took five boxes of “physical files” from the State Department that included records marked “Muslim Engagement Documents.”

  1308. Robbie says:

    Chicon says:
    December 14, 2017 at 9:55 pm
    Phil, we all know Robbie would be livid about the FBI is Hillary or JEB! were President.

    – Hey look. Chicon has reemerged from the bunker after Moore’s loss. Got any good conspiracy theories to share with us?

  1309. jason says:

    Jason, Trump could do 99 of 100 things right and Robbie will only talk about the one.”

    Yeah, the one wrong thing plus the 25 fake news items his leftist hack friend in the MSM made up.

  1310. jason says:

    Friend? No, many friends.

  1311. Robbie says:

    Phil says:
    December 14, 2017 at 10:04 pm
    The whole thing stinks to high heaven.

    – What stinks is the one sided story Fox is serving to its viewers.

    Did you know that the FBI agent who was fired from Mueller’s team also sent disparaging texts about Bernie and other Democrats? Probably not since you marinate in FoxNews only.

  1312. jason says:

    Regulation cuts 22 to 1

    He eliminated over 800 regukations from the obumbler:”

    But Tina, did you hear what he said about fake journalist Mika’s face?

    Where are your priorities?

  1313. Robbie says:

    NYCmike says:
    December 15, 2017 at 8:34 am
    Hugh,
    No sense in trying to help Robbie see the rot within a politicized portion of the FBI/CIA/DOJ. He will not accept that at all. He is all about Trump.

    – The only rot I see is your candidate selection.
    You’re a simpleton. You’re the useful idiot Lenin bragged about.

  1314. jason says:

    also sent disparaging texts about Bernie”

    Yeah, because he was pro-Hillary and he was afraid Bernie would lose to Trump.

    The point is this guy was biased to the hilt and should never have been running any investigation on Hillary or Trump.

    You really are stupid.

  1315. Bitterlaw says:

    Jason needs to work for George Lucas to ensure Quechua translations are accurate.

  1316. Bitterlaw says:

    All I want for Christmas is a new thread. Come on, Wizard.

  1317. DW says:

    One of my rules of life is to enjoy the Christmas holiday season. So politics being what it is…I am going to take a break from regular posting here until the new year.

    Looking back over the course of the last year or so there were political wins and losses, but for me, one of the biggest wins was the defeat of the light-rail project in VA Beach. I know I have talked about this before, but liberal Norfolk spent gazzillions on old-technology light rail from downtown eastward, right up to the edge of the VA Beach border. It was the classic liberal boondoggle–a high priced waste to provide a cheap ride for the homeless and those who lost their drivers licenses. But part of their plan was for VA beach to pick up their cause, add their own albatross of debt to extend the choo-choo line from the Norfolk border to the oceanfront.

    The battle was bitter, hard fought and in the end we won. We stopped it, even though the taxes had already started to pay for it. Local blogs featured regular postings from obnoxious liberals who mocked us with every accusation in the book, but we got the victory…against the local media, against the VA Beach mayor and most of city council and against the pressure from Norfolk.

    Best of all we got to see Norfolk stuffed. Stuck with a train track to nowhere that they have to pay out 9 million a year just to keep it running.

  1318. Robbie says:

    Chicon says:
    December 15, 2017 at 10:43 am
    Jason, Trump could do 99 of 100 things right and Robbie will only talk about the one. That’s why his rantings are worthless at this point. If he could write once in awhile about Trump’s successes, his rantings would be more credible.

    – And no matter how many times you try and pretend you didn’t fall for conspiracy theories, I’ll remind everyone you did.

    Trump is a disgusting vile person. I’m not willing to look past that like you are for him or you were for Roy Moore.

  1319. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 15, 2017 at 10:43 am
    But hey, let’s focus on Trump Jr’s meeting with Russian lawyer….
    “The government watchdog group Judicial Watch released documents today from the U.S. State Department showing that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her top aide Huma Abedin were allowed to “remove electronic and physical records under a claim they were ‘personal’ materials and ‘unclassified, non-record materials,” including files on Clinton’s telephone calls and schedules that were not to be made public. In addition, the documents show that Abedin took five boxes of “physical files” from the State Department that included records marked “Muslim Engagement Documents.”

    – Oh good. Now Jason fraud has resorted to quoting Judicial Watch run by nutcase Tom Fitton.

    In case you’re wondering, Tom Fitton was the idiot who went on FoxNews and said the FBI was just like the KGB.

  1320. Bitterlaw says:

    I agree that Trump is a disgusting, vile person.

    I like his judicial picks.

    Both can be true.

  1321. jason says:

    The new thread is there.

    Peyton Manning will be our new senator from TN.

  1322. jason says:

    The “disgusting vile person” IS President and can do great things for America.

    I will support him where I can.

    Obama was a pathological liar for 8 years, he got some of his agenda passed.

    I hope Trump can get some of his agenda passed too.

  1323. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 15, 2017 at 10:52 am
    also sent disparaging texts about Bernie”
    Yeah, because he was pro-Hillary and he was afraid Bernie would lose to Trump.
    The point is this guy was biased to the hilt and should never have been running any investigation on Hillary or Trump.
    You really are stupid.

    – It’s been clear for a while that you’re fraud, but now it seems you’ve become a deadender like NYCmike. You’re going to take what’s left of your credibility and ride it to the bottom on the Trumptanic.

  1324. Robbie says:

    jason says:
    December 15, 2017 at 11:02 am
    The “disgusting vile person” IS President and can do great things for